Saturday, 15 April 2017

M is for Melton Mowbray Market - National and Traditional Rare Breeds Event ...




Moving away from animals briefly to M for Markets – in this case the Melton Mowbray Market, to be found just about in the middle of Britain in Leicestershire …

The Pork Pie Shop!


… usually known for its culinary speciality: the Melton Mowbray pork pie, while the town has been promoted as the “Rural Capital of Food”.




Anyhows … we need a market in order to show, share and distribute our Traditional and Native Breeds … Melton Mowbray is one of those main markets where this happens.






It is a co-operative venture, run by the breed societies under the auspices of the Market, ensuring the animals are fully registered, the pedigree information is correct …






Melton Mowbray Poultry Market



… and offer a free ‘kinship analysis’ over the Show weekend to endeavour that the males purchased are not too closely related to the females back at the farm: improving the credentials of each breed.







The Show includes nearly a 1,000 sheep (from 24 different UK traditional and native breeds), a good selection of cattle and pigs, and a fantastic poultry and waterfowl sale.



Melton Mowbray is found in
Leicestershire county



That is M for Market, to be found in Middle England's Market town of Melton Mowbray, specialising in Traditional and Native Rare Breeds - see here for the RBST's Heritage information … from Aspects of British County Rare Breeds …


Next Rare Breeds Show and sale will be on 8th and 9th September 2017


Counties with the letter M 
(note some Counties have been retired!, or amended over historical local government … but some I’ve included)
England:  Merseyside; Middlesex
Northern Ireland: None
Scotland:  Midlothian; Moray
Wales:  Merionethshire; Mid Glamorgan; Monmouthshire; Montgomeryshire


Melton Mowbray's Market page - about

The powers that be - the Government - have imposed a no-show this year ... as the potential for bird flu infecting our flocks is of major concern ... so by imposing restriction re movement - it means the Poultry and Bird sections will probably not be functioning this year.

Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

49 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

I love that they offer Kinship analysis.
And would love to see the poultry and waterfowl side of the show in particular. Some of them are incredibly beautiful.

Courtney Turner said...

Pork pie? That's not a common dish one sees in the US. My hubby is fond of steak and kidney pie since his grandma used to make it. Not a common dish either in the US. Maui Jungalow

Rhodesia said...

Markets are something we have plenty of here, but sadly not the Melton Pork Pies. Guess I can't complain though as we do have some great markets. Cheers Diane

Keith's Ramblings said...

Interesting that the town that makes a humble pork pie is considered the capital of food! As a kid, I used to love helping in Hailsham market chasing runaway sheep and steering pigs into pens! I don't recall any rare breeds though!

A Heron's View said...

Pork pies were made in bakeries all over England. In the south west the firm who were renowned for pork products was Harris' their pies were mouthwateringly good. In Glastonbury we had a baker who made his own variety of scotch eggs and pork pies with a lattice top, I used to make my purchases from him at about seven in the morning.

Out on the prairie said...

pork pie sounds good to me. I enjoy watching the sales, and meeting producers.At church last night the pastor asked at the meal if anyone had anything planted. I replied I had radishes coming up. I laughed since three farmers have huge operations of corn and soybeans.Most of us have been busy with new calves, I had to carry one out of a ravine this last week, it wandered over the side.

Joanne said...

It would be interesting to see such a huge market. They take their animal species seriously! I bet it is noisy.

Jz said...

Oh, my lord. Now I want a pork pie... and I haven't even gotten though my first coffee of the day.
The kinship analysis surprised me a little, but only because I'd never really given it much thought. Makes perfect sense when you stop and think for a minute, doesn't it? (What can I say? I'm a computer geek - animal husbandry is not in the forefront of our minds.)
OK, off for more coffee...

FinnBadger said...

I love pork pies, something you don't see in the US. Now I'm hungry...

Phillip | M is for Mail Me Some Art

Jo said...

The minute I saw Melton Mowbray I immediately thought of the pork pie. Delicious. We can get them here, not sure where they are made, probably Canada, but they are not as delicious somehow.

I seem to recall living in Melton Mowbray during the war when we were moving around with my father in the airforce. However, it was a very long time ago. Didn't know they had an important market there. Pity about the bird flu.

J Lenni Dorner said...

That's really interesting. I've never been to such an event. I suppose restrictions are the only way to prevent bird flu and such from spreading, but that must be hard on the people that rely on such means for money.

Bob Scotney said...

We know Melton Mowbray well especially the pork pies. As for counties beginning with "M' I cringe to see Merseyside included. More appropriate for rare 'breeds' might be Mercia.

Andrea Ostapovitch said...

I've not had a pork pie, but think I should like to, especially if it's in the food capital. It makes me smile to know that people are taking such care in breeding their animals.
Andrea

Lenny Lee said...

i never had a pork pie but it sure sounds delicious. must be similar to chicken pot pie. it's cool they do kinship analysis. do they do DNA testing for that? is the market open daily or just occasionally? hmmm...the name melton sounds familiar. any relation to someone i know? :)

Trin Carl said...

The Mowrey Market sure has it's array of domestics. Great to see them reminds of the state fair. Gosh, I hope I can make it to this year's state fair.

Theglobaldig.blogspot.com
@trincarl

Botanist said...

OK, you've tingled my tastebuds now. I need to see if anywhere near here sells traditional pork pies!

bazza said...

I see that they they are (almost) offering genetic counselling to chickens! I approve. On a more serious note they offer a service to Caribbean people to see if engaged couples are not both carriers of the sub-dominant gene for Sickle Cell Anaemia and also among Ashkenazi Jews for Tay-Sachs. It's the same as they are doing in Melton Mowbray!
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s unimaginable Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Nilanjana Bose said...

It's important that they provide the kinship analysis. Pork pie sounds yum. I'm sure the surroundings would be super scenic to match!


Nilanjana
Madly-in-Verse

Rhonda Albom said...

The market and it's livestock dealings sound like a great quality control measure for the health of the various species. Locally, we have a vendor of pork pies that says his pies are Melton Mowbray style. I never knew what that referred to until now.

Jacqui Murray said...

That was interesting. And the kinship of the rooster--just like us humans. Fascinating.

Pamela Wright said...

My husband used to go to that area a lot when he was a police dog handler as their training base is at Melton. I must be fascinating to witness so many sheep from so many different breeds.

Pamela @ Highlands Days of Fun

Deborah Weber said...

Kinship analysis! Being a city girl there's so much I've never given thought to.

C.D. Gallant-King said...

I don't remember if it was Pillars of the Earth or World Without End (maybe both), but I was fascinated about the descriptions of medieval English market towns, and how they were the centre of life and commerce, and how towns would fight and compete to be the central hub for the region. Not what I would generally consider high stakes drama, but I was riveted.

M - You Can't Shoot Mowglis in British Columbia

peppylady (Dora) said...

Love the term market...I believe most people here would say...heading out to do some shopping...We have a farmer market in summer months.
Coffee is on

cleemckenzie said...

I was struck by the kinship analysis. Very pleased that there's such an effort to keep the animals healthy. Love M. You're really making progress through this alphabet, Hilary.

Annalisa Crawford said...

Mmm, nothing like a good Melton Mowbray pie!

Susan Scott said...

I love visiting markets - we have many here in SA though there is seldom enough time. Love that photo of Ye Olde Pork Pie Shop - that would make my husband so happy. Pork Pies are a real treat for him - though why he has them with chutney instead of mustard I do not know ..

Emily Bloomquist said...

Love that they do kinship analysis. Sounds like an interesting market. Your non-animal post was about animals after all :) And informative, like all of your posts.

Emily | My Life In Ecuador

Sara C. Snider said...

The kinship analysis is a great idea. Glad to see the breeds being taken care of. :)

Chicky Kadambari said...

This WAS a post about animals after all! :D
I was reminded of the animal market in the movie Black Beauty, though the Melton Mowbray market sounds so much "healthier" than the one in the movie!

Btw, I'm lagging behind. (Was unwell.) Will post my 'L' and catch up with your 'L' next Sunday. In the meantime, DO visit my 'M'.

Happy AtoZing!
Chicky @ www.mysteriouskaddu.com

Maddy Maddocks said...

Hi Hikary, what a marvellousbidea fir Ato Z week. 😊x

Maddy Maddocks said...

Oops many typos I'm afraid. My post abive sounds a little foreign! 😉

SENCO Cat Herder said...

I had to come over as I am getting to know Melton Mowbray quite well now and have certainly visited Ye Olde Pork Pie Shoppe but did not know about their rare breeds auction so must look out for that later this year hopefully the bird flu problem will be over by then :)

John Holton said...

Melton Mowbray... any relation?

Nick Wilford said...

Seems there's more to Melton Mowbray than pies - but that's a pretty good accolade all by itself. Thanks for the info!

Liz A. said...

That's a great thing. Too bad about the bird flu, though.

Jean Davis said...

The bird flu is really messing with a lot of fun things, especially the zoos around here. Many of the very neat bird exhibits have been empty because if it. It's a shame it's causing problems for the market too.
Discarded Darlings - Jean Davis, Speculative Fiction Writer, A to Z: Editing Fiction

Claire Annette said...

Oh - this is a place I definitely want to visit. My children raised sheep and dairy goats and I always loved waked around the animal area of the county fairs.
The Kinship analysis sounds very interesting.

crgalvin said...

I'm enjoying all your quirky and interesting posts. will have to come back at the end of this April madness to finish reading them. Thanks for commenting on mine, you are generous with your writing time.

DeeDee said...

I love your posts and this one is just so beautiful

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC – it’s been interesting to note the care being taken with the Kinship analysis. I’m sure the Show really does let us look closely at all the poultry and waterfowl … lovely distinctive characteristic looks …

@ Courtney – pork pie is a favourite around here … but steak and kidney pie too – both common … I’m glad to say. Wonderful your husband has happy memories of his grandma and her pie …

@ Diane – the French have amazing markets …well you can get your fix for a pork pie or two on your visits back here!

@ Keith – I guess it’s just the way it’s worked out… a market town near some big cities, but interesting enough to become a foodie centre.

Did you used to help at our local Hailsham market … pity about them closing it down …

@ Mel – yes there are other makes, but the Melton Mowbray pie has European Protected designation of origin – equally I know the other butchers will have exceptional tasting pork pies … and scotch eggs and all the other special goodies … it’s always good to get to the market at 7.00 am …

@ Steve – I love a pork pie occasionally. I’ve never been to a sale and as our local market has closed, suspect I never will. Well done on your radishes … I expect the farmers are ahead of the game – mind you – you’ll enjoy yours better probably. I’m glad you rescued that calf – I hope it’s grateful to you …

@ Joanne – yes it would be interesting to be there and to watch the auction, as too wander around … and noisy: very probably!

@ Jz – sorry! Actually I could do with a pork pie now – even though it’s breakfast time (or earlier). Yes I was pleased to find out they were making sure about the kinship analysis … I’m neither a computer geek nor a whizz on rare breeds – so this snippet got put into the post!

@ Phillip – sorree … I suspect pork pies will get a few taste buds rolling …

@ Jo – I’m sure the pork pies found in Canada don’t really match up to the ‘real thing’ … but at least you can find them. Interesting that your father probably was stationed near-by during the War … I expect the market was built back up once the atrocities were over … yes the bird flu is a troubling virus.

@ JL – good to see you … and yes the bird fowl owners are struggling at the moment …

@ Bob – I thought you’d be well aware of Melton Mowbray and their pies … sorry about the ‘Merseyside’ county – I wrote the posts last year … and didn’t think that particular ‘government area out … not a good choice!

@ Andrea – lovely to meet you … and yes I’m pleased our passions for the various breeds are being so scrupulously looked after and recorded. Pork pie is delicious!

@ Lenny – yes they are similar … but the pork pie is a cold meat pie … containing pork and jelly sealed in a hot water crust pastry and cooked before being allowed to cool and the jelly to set.

Oh yes of course – I’d not taken that into account … the name Melton is familiar isn’t it!

@ Trin – lovely to meet you and it’s good you usually get to visit your State Fair. The markets are quite careful with their show animals …

@ Ian – oh dear another commenter who now would like a pork pie! I’m sure you can get one – not sure how traditional it’d be …

@ Bazza – it does look like genetic counselling doesn’t it – but as you confirm it’s an excellent way of protecting the species. I wasn’t aware of the tests offered for engaged couples from the Caribbean (a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder) or the Ashkenazi Jews for a possible blood disorder: thanks for reminding us.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nila – the kinship analysis is so important as in some breeds there are very few animals left – but this way they protect that species. Pork pie is delicious – Leicestershire is a pretty county with wonderful countryside …

@ Rhonda – I was interested to know more about the market as I used to live fairly nearby. Ah – well now you know about Melton Mowbray pork pies …

@ Jacqui – yes the kinship element is interesting to note the care that is being taken with our animals too

@ Pamela – I’m sure Ken would be able to tell you a lot more about the area … and wandering around a Rare Breeds show is a special treat …

@ Deborah – we so often don’t think of things til 2 + 2 get put together … I’m amazed at what I learn.

@ CD – I’m afraid I haven’t read either of the Follett books – but his descriptions would be pretty good I imagine … I must read them sometime – these sorts of novels are wonderfully informative to read –as you mention …

@ Dora – good to see you … and yes I guess if you said you were going to market we’d think the same. It’s good the farmers can get around and offer their goodies direct to us …

@ Lee – it is wonderful to know that people are passionate about their specific love of a breed … and to make sure each will be here in the future …

@ Annalisa – oh I couldn’t agree more – a pork pie is a treat …

@ Susan – it’s good the markets are still going in South Africa … but time is always of the essence isn’t it. I had to put the pork pie shop in - well there’s a few around here, where he can indulge. Funny how we develop different tastes … I think I have both or either …. Depending on the way I feel …

@ Emily – it’s good about the kinship analysis isn’t it – oh yes I usually stick to the brief … and thank you – like to make the content informative …

@ Sara – the Rare Breed societies seem to have established the best way forward for protecting the species …

@ Chicky – yes animals were here all the time! Oh I didn’t see the movie Black Beauty … but I’m glad this version of a market seems better and healthier.

Sorry you haven’t been well … it happens to us all …

@Maddy – good to see you … no worries re your commenting – I understand … just nice you’re here … and I’m glad the theme for my posts is proving ‘a hit’ …

@ Senco – interesting you live nearby – and I hope you can get over in September to see the Auction – I imagine it’d be very interesting … Glad you’ve had a chance to visit the Pork Pie shop!

@ John – could have been … but don’t think so!

@ Nick – the market town is thriving apparently – which is good to know …

@ Liz – the town and Rare Breed auctions are very good standards … these viruses are a worry though …

@ Jean – have you got bird flu over in the States too – such a pity … it seems to be devastating your stock as well …

@ Claire – well I hope at some stage you’ll get to visit – and how wonderful your children raised sheep and dairy goats … walking around shows at a county show is a treat isn’t it.

@ Carmel – that’s great – thank you ... I aim to please with my posts … and I try and do as much as I can re visiting other bloggers …

@ DeeDee – that’s good to know – thank you …

Thanks for visiting everyone – lovely to have all your comments … cheers Hilary

Cynthia Rodrigues Manchekar said...

I find markets very fascinating. I like the thought of a market that showcases domesticated animals.

bookworm said...

I would love to go to one of those rare breed markets. Alas, I'm just a few thousand miles away. The Unknown Journey Ahead agingonthespectrum.blogspot.com

Michelle Wallace said...

It's sad to read that the potential for bird flu infecting the flock may throw a spanner in the works this year...

Jemima Pett said...

I never knew that Melton Mowbray had a rare breeds market :)
Jemima on Ornithology

Deniz Bevan said...

Love visiting markets like these. And I still haven't tasted that pork pie!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Cynthia – well we have all sorts of markets – but it’s good the Rare Breeds Society has their own time-frame … time where they can meet, talk, and no doubt network around …

@ Bookworm – it would be interesting to be there for a day and see the animals, see how the market works etc – sorry a few thousand miles is a little too far isn’t it!

@ Michelle – the viruses (bird flu) that are around now – are becoming more of a problem … I’ve noted the pig one in Denmark …

@ Jemima – I’d have never known if I hadn’t of been writing these posts …

@ Deniz – ah ha … the pork pie – well next time you’re over here – then you must have a Melton Mowbray one … Fortnums do them!!

Cheers to you – so delighted you’re interested in the Rare Breed markets … Hilary

Sharon M Himsl said...

(Will attempt to catch up!)
One of these days you will have to share a recipe for "Melton Mowbray pork pie." Here in the U.S. pork has become so lean it resembles chicken breast. Is your pork pie fattier?