Thursday, 29 September 2011

Dancing in the Shadows of Love - the book

Shakespeare, Southern Africa, Spiritual connections, emotional aspects and more add up to make Judy Croome's book a melding of thought processes across many layers of life: ancestral, colonial and philosophical ...

"On the Prowl" - original art by
Fuz  Caforio (c/o Judy Croome)
In this Question and Answer interview Judy gives us more background to her wonderful novel "Dancing in the Shadows of Love", which allows us to explore the world that is Southern Africa, to gain a greater understanding into our humanity ... enjoy!

Judy has kindly offered you a GiveAway ... details to enter are at the end of the post ...

Tell us a little about your novel “Dancing in the Shadows of Love”

In the haunting “Dancing in the Shadows of Love,” three emotionally adrift women fight to heal their fractured worlds. Not everyone can be a hero. Or can they?

Buoyed by touches of magical realism, this story is a spiritual one and, while remaining remarkably areligious and boldly atmospheric, explores the sacrifices people make in the pursuit of a love that transcends everyday existence. Lulu’s quest, and that of Jamila and Zahra too, is to find the divine love that will fulfil their hopes and save their souls...if they can recognise the masks of those who seek to lead them astray.


Penguin Classic
All the chapters in “Dancing in the Shadows of Love” begin with a quote from a Shakespearean play.  With the exception of the last chapter’s quote, which comes from the comedy “Love’s Labour’s Lost”, all the other quotes were from tragedies. Was this just a coincidence?

There’s very little that’s coincidental in this story. Each quote sets the scene for the chapter to follow. I want this story to show people that, no matter how bad things get, there is always hope. So the quote “Charity itself fulfils the law, and who can sever love from charity?” (Love’s Labour’s Lost, Act IV, Sc iii) summarises one of the main themes of the novel: compassion, which is the highest form of love, can heal many things wrong in this world.

Isn’t that a naïve outlook? That love solves all?

I prefer “optimistic” or “positive reinforcement” to the word “naïve.” There are so many novels (and movies and songs) which reflect humanity in all its petty meanness and deep depravity. If people are only shown how bad things are, how will we ever reach the highest good we’re capable of? It’s about time someone wrote a story which showed the way things can be, if ordinary people start living in hope rather than living in fear and despair.


In a recent interview author Judith Mercado quoted Zahra, one of the three main characters in “Dancing in the Shadows of Love” who, in the novel, said, “We are lost, and I was aware that the glimpses we have of love, a transcendental love that is sacrosanct, are reserved for the privileged few.” How do you define transcendental love?
Transcendental, or Divine, Love is an a priori human potential that exists within all of us, irrespective of our culture or religion or life circumstances. When we find within us that capacity to overcome our subjective hurts and emotions; when we can reach out a helping hand to others, across all the external barriers and differences that separate us, and all the pain and suffering of our own secret wounds, we transcend our humanity and reach our highest potential as human beings.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow once said, "If we could read the secret history of our enemies, we should find in each man's life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility." When we’re hurting or angry or betrayed, and we can still find the inner strength to tap into that a priori compassion within our soul to disarm our hostility towards others, then we have made the dream of transcendental love a reality.
Masvingo, near Zvishavane, Zimbabwe
Zahra, lost in her despair, does not realise that this love is available to all of us…if we choose compassion instead of hatred; peace over anger and forgiveness over revenge. And, as Zahra finds out, this love is not reserved for a “privileged few” but is accessible to ordinary people, like me and you, who want to make a difference in the world.
Tell us a little about yourself
Born in a little village called Zvishavane in Zimbabwe, I’ve spent most of my life in South Africa. My diverse career path has had me working as a waitress in a steakhouse; as a bartender in an English pub (to earn money to pay for a hot air balloon ride for my Mom and myself!); and as an accountant, which was my career for many years. 

Always fascinated by evolutionary astrology, I resigned as Chief Financial Officer for a large accountancy firm when I got married, and spent the next decade dabbling in writing novels, while studying and practising evolutionary astrology.

I loved helping people through crisis times in their lives, but two years ago, I was so drained from all the emotional counselling, I decided it was time to follow my own destiny and concentrate on my dream of writing fiction. So…here I am!

What natural talent would you like to be gifted with?

The Mozart family on tour:
Leopold, Wolfgang, and Nanneri.
Watercolour by Carmontelle, ca 1763
If I could choose a talent, it would be to write music like Mozart.

 Where can we connect with you on-line?

Twitter, Goodreads and LibraryThing are the best places to find me.
You can also find me on my blog and on Facebook.

Giveaway
Four random commentators will win one of 2 Paperbacks and 2 eBook editions of “Dancing in the Shadows of Love” offered by author Judy Croome.
Rules:
- Leave a comment with your email address.
-Only one edition per winner
-Please mention what edition you would like to win if your name is drawn
- International
- Ends (8 October 2011)


NB I've put word verification back on .... 
Hilary Melton-Butcher

Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

57 comments:

  1. Hi Judy .. this was a great interview to do .. your book brought back so many evocative memories of Africa - and that spiritual connection that I hope to appreciate more as time goes on ..

    If I could have a talent and perhaps change eras .. I would love to be a polymath - have that desire (and where-with-all) to constantly learn about all subjects ..

    I would love to be able to draw and understand art, as well as be able to comprehend music .. and ride a horse .. and I guess a few other things ..

    Your book has opened up new possibilities for me too -

    Enjoy Judy's book everyone and this interview in the meantime ..

    Wonderful summer's day here!!! It's so gorgeously warm .. almost like Africa ..?! Hilary

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  2. I had a wonderful gift ......I loved music from a very early age. I could play the piano, had lesson, passed many examinations but when love came along I finished my lesson, how I regret it . I still love music but I do wish I could play the piano as I once did.
    Yvonne.

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  3. @ Yvonne .. great to see you - and you're so lucky to have that gift - you still have that understanding .. and your mind holds so much ..

    I'm sure it's never too late to pick up where you left off - life is like that .. it allows the rust to fall away (granted slowly!) ..

    My uncle wanted to a piano all his life - my aunt wasn't keen - but we went off and he bought a keyboard .. and I think he enjoyed using it - he was 83 at that stage! It's gone on to one of his many nieces, as she has a small child now .. and they'll enjoy.

    Thanks for commenting so quickly - at least I know my changes re comment verification worked!

    I hope you can get a long walk on your beach .. glorious weather .. Hilary

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  4. Mozart could sure write music. I love the many jobs your guest writer has had and her inspiration behind her story. Thanks for the interview.

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  5. What a lovely interview, Hilary, and what a refreshing approach to life Judy has.

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  6. Great interview, Hilary and review.

    Judy, your book sounds very intriguing. Much luck, I wish for you.

    Teresa

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  7. Oh this sounds like a delightful book! Please enter me for a print copy if I'm lucky enough to win! My email address is karenjonesgowen@gmail.com.

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  8. HILARY: Thanks for having me visit! I think you already *are* a polymath – your blog is so varied and interesting and knowledgeable! (And it’s a boiling hot day here today – already needing the first rains!)

    YVONNE: My uncle could pick up any instrument and play it – he couldn’t read a note of music, but played beautifully. He took after his grandfather (my great-grandfather) who was a talented pianist and music teacher. Perhaps that’s whyI I think music is the greatest artistic talent of all – it crosses boundaries in a way no other art can.

    HILARY: I agree with you – it’s never to late to start again. Beric (Husband) always wanted to play the violin but never had the opportunity as a child – I’ve promised his violen lessons when he retires!!

    CLARISSA: My favourite job was working in the pub in the UK – my boss was an ex-Royal Marine sergeant major and he was a delight! It was at the height of anti-apartheid sentiment and some of the customers would get a bit “iffy” when they recognised my accent – the Sarge wsa terrific, he stepped in as my protector and stopped any drama with militray precision!! I wonder where he is now?

    JABBLOG: Thanks…“refreshing” sounds so much better, than, well..crazy!! :)

    TERESA: Thanks for the good luck wishes – received with gratitude!

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  9. Karen: If you win, I hope you find the story interesting...

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  10. It must have felt great to have worked at all those jobs, then be able to write a terrifc account of it. Thanks for sharing the interview Hilary. This was a great inspiration even at my age.

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  11. @ Munir .. yes Munir - Judy's done some amazing jobs hasn't she .. and her book is a great story about the sacrifices these three women make through their lives .. it's a fascinating tale of (soul) love.

    @ Clarissa .. Judy's selection of Mozart as her music master would inspire us all. Judy's knowledge of the wider world, and particularly South Africa, and the muses in it come to the fore in her book.

    @ Janice - I can tell you since I met Judy .. I have been entranced at her generosity and understanding of my situation .. she's enhanced my mother's life this year - and that's been a huge blessing for me.

    @ Teresa - many thanks .. Judy's book is so interesting .. I'm sure you'd love it from the Spiritual aspects she highlights.

    @ Karen - as a publisher, come author, I'm sure this would inspire you .. the way Judy has combined all her aspects .. her quotes, the cover art etc .. and she made a promotional Book video ... amazingly worth it ..

    Thanks for the GiveAway entry!!

    Thanks Judy for coming by and answering the comments so far - it's great to share a blog post with someone .. and your book deserves all the attention it gets - it's so very good.

    Cheers everyone .. Hilary

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  12. Munir: surprisingly not one of those jobs can be found in my story...unless you count Lulu's job at the Court of St Jerome (it can sort of be related to accountancy!) And now I think of it a lot of the spiritual laws which underpin evolutionary astrology make an appearance in the book too...! :)

    Hilary: As always, it's my pleasure! I always leave your blog smiling and I love visiting you!

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  13. Hilary and Judy, excellent interview. The book sounds fascinating and intriguing. Thank you. I would love to hear more.

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  14. Very nice interview. I've got to agree with the attitude expressed here. We need more positive and optimistic outlooks in the world. A little bit of love can go a long way and a whole lotta love can absolutely work miracles.


    Lee
    Tossing It Out

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  15. Compassion is very much a great healer. The book sounds interesting in that it would just be nice to have something optimistic to read for a change.
    My email is lkharr2000@gmail.com
    Thanks,
    Linda

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  16. Thanks Hilary for the interview and the info on Judy's book. It sounds like a most philosophical and zen story. I'd also like to believe that love transcends all!

    Take care
    x

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  17. Hilary,
    Thanks for the info about Judy and her book. I always like to learn more about other writers. Always enjoy your photos and pictures, too. :)
    Have a lovely weekend!
    Blessings,
    Karen

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  18. @ Joylene - glad you enjoyed the interview .. the book is fascinating - and I'm looking forward to reading yours - as I suspect there's some similar thought processes at work -

    @ Lee - delighted to read that the blog matches the thoughts that Judy expresses here and in her book .. her ideas are excellent .. and ..

    .. exactly as you say a little bit of love can go a long way - a whole lotta love can absolutely work miracles!

    @ Rubye - lovely to see you again .. and am delighted you'd be interested in reading the book - and definitely I'll enter your name into the draw .... compassion is a great healer.

    @ Old Kitty - great to have you here .. it is a very empathetic book - it really drew me back to Africa! My uncle always used the phrase "love is all" - I'll always remember those words ... we used them often in our discussions ...

    @ Karen - isn't it great to hear about a new author .. Judy's been so supportive of me and my mother since I 'met' her in April .. that Africa connection!

    Delighted you enjoy the accompanying photos - thanks ..

    How wonderful of you all to come by .. so pleased you're enjoying meeting Judy .. and Africa!!

    Cheers - Hilary

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  20. JOYLENE: You can pop over to the novel’s blog to read more. Click on one of the links in Hilary's post (That's why the above comment is deleted - my html code didn't work!

    ARLEE: I agree – love *does* work miracles, and I’m tired of reading books that are either all doom & gloom OR have happy endings, but don’t explore deep topics. I combined the happy ending with a serious topic, because there’s too much negativity in the world as it is!

    Rubye Jack: (Linda)Yes, so true! How often do we feel so much better when someone shows us a small kindness. In my book my characters experience a lot of heartache…but they learn about giving and receiving kindness too

    OLD KITTY: Love your profile pic! Hmmm. Yes, I suppose my story is both zen and philosophical, which doesn’t necessarily make it an easy to read book; a reader has to be able to “go with the flow” of the story…

    KAREN: Hilary always manages to put together the most fascinating collages on her blog posts!

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  21. Hi Blonde Duck .. Judy's book is extremely thought provoking .... good to see you here commenting - thank you.. Hilary

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  22. Writing music like Mozart is a great thing to aspire to. Maybe she can write even BETTER music than his.

    And I love how Shakespeare just keeps on going and going and going. had he any idea?

    xoxo

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  23. Blonde Duck: I love magical realism too!! :)

    Jannie: On my, how I wish I could write better music than Mozart! The closest I'll come in this lifetime is sharing a birthday with Ludwig von Beethoven. And Shakespeare truly is the greatest writer - I've seen McBeth done to a Zulu theme and Romeo & Juliet to a modern gang war theme (in that brilliant movie version with Leondardo di Caprio & Clare Danes)and both worked. SHows how teh Bard transcended the specifics of his time and went right to the heart of a universal (and enduring) humanity.

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  24. Sorry Jannie, that should be Macbeth (not McBeth) - my excuse is it's late here (or rather, early: 00h49!)

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  25. @ Jannie .. Judy's music is in her words and the pictures she paints for us to sense .. now you are on your way to doing both with your singing and your guitar .. talents you both have and are developing.

    Shakespeare he does inspire us all doesn't he .. and I loved Judy's idea of road-mapping her chapters with his quotes.

    @ Judy - I think seeing Macbeth done to a Zulu theme would be fantastic .. with the modern takes that are now put into his plays are so interesting to watch.

    I've yet to get to the Globe Theatre .. in fact right now would be a good time - beautiful weather!

    I need to learn so much more about the arts - literature, music and art itself ..

    Cheers Jannie and Judy .. lovely to have you both here .. Hilary

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  26. Interesting book and post! I love that Judy focused on her dream of writing after getting drained from the years of counseling others. Being able to write is wonderful...but I've always wanted to be able to draw.

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  27. Hi Judy and Hilary. Thank you for such a wonderful interview - the book sounds fantastic.

    I'd love to write music like Chopin.

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  28. @ Elizabeth .. thank you - isn't it good that people, like Judy, have the courage to walk away and do what they want to do .. focus on her dream of writing .. this book shows she can do it & more ... it's extremely interesting on so many levels ..

    I'll join you in wishing I could draw and paint ..

    @ Talli - delighted to read you enjoyed the interview - it's good to get behind the story .. and as you say the book is amazing and quite extraordinary ...

    I'd just love to understand music .. and then I could listen to you in appreciation playing your Chopin! He did write some beautiful pieces ..

    I love music though, and art .. that learning process continues on .. cheers to you both .. have good weekends .. Hilary

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  29. Hi Hilary, bless you always for your lovely supportive comments on my blog. I've been feeling a little more creative over the past couple of days and gradually catching up in bogland.

    I love that Dancing in the Shadows of Love, 'explores the sacrifices people make in the pursuit of a love' sounds truly lovely.

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  30. Fascinating hearing from your guest and what an inspirational reminder to take away from this blog post. No matter how bad things get, there's always hope. Thanks.

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  31. @ Madeleine .. pleasure - it's just so ghastly a feeling when you feel grotty - just look after yourself though.

    Judy's book is a delight .. and by the sound of it she's inspiring many with her words, phrases and ideas .. it's a great book.

    @ Ros .. Judy has been incredibly uplifting and inspiring in her posts and stories about her book .. there's so much more to it - we can all learn so much from Zahara, Jamila and Lulu ..

    .. as you say 'there's always hope' - long may that continue .. the positive of life ..

    Great to see you both - thanks Madeleine and Ros .. cheers for a good weekend .. sunny weather here for us three - that's unusual! Hilary

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  32. Hi Hilary and Judy,

    Love the Longfellow quote. In fact, that entie paragraph is really inspirational.

    Good luck with the book Judy!

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  33. ELIZABETH: Drawing is a fabulous gift to have, but somehow I yearn more for the gift of creating beautiful music

    TALLI: Chopin is good too! (Although Mozart is the one who really “speaks” to my soul)

    MADELEINE: I know that feeling of never quite being able to catch up with all the blogland visits…I keep on saying I’m going to cut down my blog/net time, but it never seems to happen!

    ROSALIND: One of my favourite tarot cards is the 10 of swords in the Rider-Waite pack – very briefly (because it’s packed with symbolism) the card shows a man lying stabbed in the back with 10 swords down his spine; the card (a first glance) is very black – a dark and heavy card, full of exhaustion and loss and overwhelming problems (he was stabbed with TEN swords, not just one!) People cringe when this card is drawn in a reading, but if one looks carefully, very carefully, there are those glimmers of hope: a tiny ray of yellow sunshine peeping over the horizon in the card and the figure is not completely unconscious, the thumb and ring finger form the symbolic mudra of joy (Buddhists call it the “kichigo-in” mudra). He may be battered by life and external circumstances, as we all so often are in today’s uncertain world, but there is still hope…and that, Rosalind, was a rather long winded ramble to say that, yes, I agree 100% with you - even in the darkest situation, there is always hope!

    CHASE: When I get cross with someone (I mean really furious) I try to drag that Longfellow quote up into my mind and it’s amazing how often it helps me laugh at situations that would otherwise have upset me for ages: that horrible woman who pushed ahead of me in the queue may be rushing home to an ill child or that salesperson who didn’t smile at my joke may be suffering from a headache…when we remember other’s secret sorrows, it makes our own seem esaier to bear.

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  34. Oh no! What happened to my comment? I answered everyone from Elizabeth to Chase and now I can't find my comment!!

    Much too long to rewrite - all I can hope is that Hilary has turned spam block on again and my comment is lurking in her inbox waiting for approval!!

    If it's disappeared into cyber space, then all I'll say is thanks for commenting everyone!

    Judy, South Africa

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  35. Hi Judy .. fortunately it did come through 'correctly' into my inbox ..why it disappeared I've no idea ..

    ELIZABETH: Drawing is a fabulous gift to have, but somehow I yearn more for the gift of creating beautiful music

    TALLI: Chopin is good too! (Although Mozart is the one who really “speaks” to my soul)

    MADELEINE: I know that feeling of never quite being able to catch up with all the blogland visits…I keep on saying I’m going to cut down my blog/net time, but it never seems to happen!

    ROSALIND: One of my favourite tarot cards is the 10 of swords in the Rider-Waite pack – very briefly (because it’s packed with symbolism) the card shows a man lying stabbed in the back with 10 swords down his spine; the card (a first glance) is very black – a dark and heavy card, full of exhaustion and loss and overwhelming problems (he was stabbed with TEN swords, not just one!) People cringe when this card is drawn in a reading, but if one looks carefully, very carefully, there are those glimmers of hope: a tiny ray of yellow sunshine peeping over the horizon in the card and the figure is not completely unconscious, the thumb and ring finger form the symbolic mudra of joy (Buddhists call it the “kichigo-in” mudra). He may be battered by life and external circumstances, as we all so often are in today’s uncertain world, but there is still hope…and that, Rosalind, was a rather long winded ramble to say that, yes, I agree 100% with you - even in the darkest situation, there is always hope!

    CHASE: When I get cross with someone (I mean really furious) I try to drag that Longfellow quote up into my mind and it’s amazing how often it helps me laugh at situations that would otherwise have upset me for ages: that horrible woman who pushed ahead of me in the queue may be rushing home to an ill child or that salesperson who didn’t smile at my joke may be suffering from a headache…when we remember other’s secret sorrows, it makes our own seem esaier to bear.

    So from Judy .. to you Elizabeth, Talli, Madeleine, Ros and Chase .. thanks not lost forever ..

    From Judy!

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  36. Hi Chase .. Judy obviously has a huge working knowledge of English, philosophical ideas and quotations .. so am very happy to hear you appreciated her thoughts ..

    I'll have to look into the Longfellow quote in more detail ..

    Cheers Hilary

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  37. @ Judy .. and everyone - Blogger is getting more difficult about embedded comment boxes - but that's by the by .. to some extent .. however -

    your comment (even though I use a pop up box) went into Spam - so it didn't disappear ..

    If someone else has commented (not necessarily here) and their comment has 'vanished' .. it's just possible it's in that person's spam folder - waiting to be rescued .. as I've just done for Judy's comment.

    I've left word verification on .. and haven't changed anything since I put the post up ..

    Have good weekends everyone .. Hilary

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  38. Thank you for the book recommendation Hilary,and thank you Judy for the insightful interview.
    All the best with your book and future writing!
    ~Scarlett

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  39. I very much enjoyed, among other things, learning that, if Judy Croome could choose a natural talent, it would be to write music like Mozart. Much success with the book!

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  40. You teed this up so well, right from the getgo ... what a perfect way to start

    "a melding of thought processes across many layers of life: ancestral, colonial and philosophical"

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  41. Great interview ladies; I love the view over here~ I love all the quotes and the ideas! We do need more hope in our world! Congrats on writing such an inspiring book~
    I play music, but would to be as talented as the 2Cellos~

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  42. @ Scarlett - you'd love the art work associated with the book - Judy did an interview with Martin Wenkidu .. which I'm sure you'd enjoy - it's here ..

    http://judycroome.blogspot.com/2011/04/man-and-world-of-stars.html

    @ Susan - sorry couldn't arrange an interview with Judy and Mozart! .. wouldn't it be wonderful just to be able to sit and write beautiful compositions .. lovely

    @ JD - thanks for coming by and so pleased you enjoyed the interview with Judy .. her book blends so many thought processes ..

    @ Ella - lovely to see you and delighted you enjoyed the review .. and as you say - it is an inspiring book .. wonderful to read you play music - presumably the cello? .. but perhaps many instruments in your household.

    Judy - isn't it wonderful everyone has such great passions for music and art .. and writing ..

    Thanks Scarlett, Susan, JD and Ella .. enjoy the weekend .. Hilary

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  43. SCARLETT: Thanks for the good wishes! I must stop chatting on the net and start that next book of mine which has been buzzing in my head for a while now...

    SUSAN: I’m always fascinated by the kind of genius that Mozart had. Shakespeare was another …thanks for your good wishes!

    JD: Hilary did assess the story well; I’ve tried to weave many layers into the book so that a reader can sense that there, just beyond the veil of the words, lies something more…

    ELLA: Lucky you – being able to play music! I can’t hold a tune to save my life (maybe that’s why I’m so impressed with young Wolfgang?) :)

    HILARY: ha ha! If ever I had a table of favourite guests, Mozart would be on the list! And, yes, it’s lovely to know that the arts can still inspire passion! Have a great weekend everyone!

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  44. What an interesting interview. Judy, you are an amazing lady. Congratulations on your book.

    Great post, Hilary, as always!

    Doris

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  45. DORIS: Glad you enjoyed the interview (but I really think social workers are the amazing ones - so much patience and compassion!)

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  46. @ Doris .. lovely to see you here again for what is definitely a definitive interview ..

    Judy's book is so interesting .. so many layers of understanding - however deep we feel we wish to go ..

    @ Judy .. thanks so much for coming by .. I agree social workers are very patient ... and listen loads ..

    All the very best and have a good weekend .. Hilary

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  47. Thank goodness courage rises to the fore for gifted people after becoming sick & tired of being sick and tired! What a gem Judy has offered.

    Thank you, Hilary, for bringing Judy and her book to our attention. I know a few friends who will appreciate it with me.

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  48. A very interesting interview and yes if we can find the good in us and spread love this world would be a better place and people would be connected to each other

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  49. @ Amy - Judy has given us so much to think about in her book - there are so many wonderful timeless ideas to be explored and mulled over ... the characters open themselves to help themselves find their true mores ..

    Delighted you think you have some friends who'll be interested in Judy's book .. and am glad that you know where she is ..

    @ Marja - so pleased you too liked the interview and picked up if only we can all realise our own good and spread this love through the world - we'd all be in a better place.

    Thanks Amy and Marja .. good to have you here - Hilary

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  50. AMY: Sometimes the things sent to try us turn out to be in our best interest! (although it doesn’t feel like it at the time) Hindsight has made me realise that this long journey has really been very good for me! :)

    MARJA: So true! I find it sad that so many books and movies -even the daily news- concentrate only on the bad and negative in people – we’d all be a lot more content if we could focus on the good and the loving (even if it’s only a glimmer…)

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  51. What a gorgeous cover!

    I love books that use appropriate quotes to the beginning of chapters. I just finished American Gods by Neil Gaiman, and he does the same thing.

    For my new job, I pass by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's house everyday. It's in Cambridge. I've been here for 10 years. How is it I've never been inside?

    Please enter me to win tmilstein at gmail dot com

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  52. Hi Theresa .. thank goodness you're one of three (now) who've left your email ..

    .. Isn't the cover interesting .. and if you get a chance to link over - the background to the whole story is fascinating ..

    I wonder why we live near things and never get inside! Perhaps because you had young kids and it wasn't appropriate for them .. but now you can visit Longfellow's house - looking forward to hearing your post about it .. sometime!

    With pleasure I'll enter you into the draw .. cheers for now and have a good week at the not so new job now .. Hilary

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  53. Theresa: Nice to know I'm keeping good company by using quotes! :) (Cambridge is one of my favourite places!)

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  54. Oh Hilary what a great review and interview - You know I love reading and this just sounds glorious. Being about a different country and culture and all the wisdom built up from her experiences - it should be a grand read..

    Your last review was such a fun read.

    I added this book to my list and
    here is my email:
    patricia at patriciaswisdom dot come

    I am reading a hard cover book right now that is too small print - I love to read on my kindle so I can make the print just right

    Thanks for this good read and introduction It was greatly appreciated

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  55. Hi Patricia .. I thought the book might interest you .. it is fascinating and covers the areas you're interested in ..

    It will certainly be fascinating to hear your views on the book .. and you're in the draw - for a kindle version ..

    The extra background via Judy's interview with the artist etc are well worth reading first ...

    Judy has done a first class job with her 'extras' .. the book with her words really does open the flower of Africa to us .. rose, thorns and all .. it is up to us to uncover the meaning within.

    Delighted you enjoyed the interview - I shall enter you into the draw.

    Cheers and lovely to see you here .. Hilary

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  56. Patricia: I hope you enjoy the book - and the one you're reading! Nice to hook up with you on Facebook too!

    Hilary, you've been so great with this interview - thanks for all your wonderful support and cheer-leading. It's all much appreciated. Sending a BIG HUG your way!! :)

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