Wednesday, 3 April 2013

C is for Cheese ...



The churning of curdling milk into cheeses, here in the UK, has taken on new creations in recent years ...

Lamorna's Wedding Cheese Cake
(details see under)

... whereby Charles de Gaulle’s famous quote about the French that he couldn’t govern a nation that had 246 cheeses, in the early 1960s ... 

... I'm not sure what he'd have to say today about those Brits across the Channel,  in the 21st century, having over 900 different types!



Back then those British 20th century nine basic regional cheeses ...  Cheddar, Cheshire, Caerphilly, Derby, Wensleydale, Gloucester, Leicester, Lancashire and Stilton ... were mostly factory-produced in massive blocks.



Now the 21st century has arrived entrepreneurs are determined to reproduce earlier and almost lost cheeses ... buried recipes found amongst the cobwebs of rafters, dairy farm records, creating new tastes ... a new breed of artisan offerings has become widely available.




Cornish Yarg – fresh tangy, salty and slightly crumbly – tasting of seaside holidays ... while the stinging nettle leaves give it a grey-green wrapping.




Stinking Bishop c/o Wikipedia
Stinking Bishop – named after a 19th C farmer in Gloucestershire notorious for his drunken antics.  

Stinking Bishop is of film fame – a critical role in Wallace and Gromit: ‘The Curse of the Were-Rabbit’ – brought the nation’s and world’s attention to that Stinking Bishop.


Innes Buttons (having a cousin called Innes, I couldn’t resist this cheese) – a goat’s cheese ... which is mousse like and best eaten fresh.  Choices come as natural, or prettily coated with rosemary, pink pepper or ash.

Pink Pepper Goat's
Cheese Innes Button

 Cheese that has found its place amongst the discerning British public - if only de Gaulle could see Britain today – there are over 900 cheese options from all quarters of this green and pleasant land – what would he say!


That is C for Cheese - part of the ABC series on Aspects of British Cookery.


 
Innes Button -
natural goats cheese
Ideas from Reader’s Digest.co.uk – cheeses:

Cornish Yarg – Lynher Dairies, Truro 

StinkingBishop.co.uk found in Dymock, Gloucestershire

HighfieldsFarm Dairy in Tamworth, Staffs make the Innes Buttons

TheCheese Shed.com for the Lamorna cheese wedding cake

Lamorna’s  Wedding Cake layers: base – Cornish Brie; then 2 hard cheeses Double Glos; then Wild Garlic Yarg; Colston Bassett Stilton; topped off with a little Somerset Camembert, and crowned with an exotic Katherine hard goat’s cheese – surrounded by herbs ...

Elise Fallson is doing -ology A-Z words and her F letter is Fromology - the study of cheeses ... 

Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

67 comments:

Rhonda said...

Either I shop in the wrong part of the store (most likely) or there are not that many choices of cheese here in New Zealand. Funny for such a big dairy producing country.

Rhonda @Laugh-Quotes.com
AtoZ #42

Rosalind Adam said...

My favourite of those cheese is Cornish Yarg. They sell it in our local deli but when we went on holiday to Cornwall we were amazed to see that nowhere sold it and the deli owner I spoke to there had never heard of it!

YVONNE LEWIS: said...

Being brought up in Bristol which was not far from Cheddar we were frequent visitors. Great post Hilary.

Yvonne.

Patsy said...

I could willingly consume some crumbly cheddar right now!

Madeleine Sara said...

I adore cheese, especially hard Goats Cheshire and Stilton with apricots. Mmmm. Shame I am slightly lactose intolerant.

Empty Nest Insider said...

That photo of a wedding cheese cake looks nothing like the creamy cheesecakes I've seen, but it is an unusual presentation.

Julie

Elise Fallson said...

I love cheese. I could eat it every day. My favorite is a mix sheep and goat's milk cheese I get in the Pyrénées, with a glass of wine, of course.
Cheers!
(:

A-Z participant blogging from Elise Fallson

Nick Wilford said...

It's great they're unearthing some old, lost recipes. Never seen a wedding cheesecake before!

Ida Chiavaro said...

As always another informative interesting post - I love Cheese, the stinkier the better, not sure about stinky bishops thought. I love the idea of using stinging nettle leaves - I have yet to be brave enough to sample the produce in my garden, but this spring I'm going for it.

Elizabeth Spann Craig/Riley Adams said...

I've never heard of any of these cheeses...what great names!

Sarah Holmes said...

I love the tiered cheese wedding cake idea - looks scrumptious! In-keeping with the Wallace and Gromit reference, one of my favourites is a good bit of Wensleydale. Great post!

Optimistic Existentialist said...

These cheeses are all new to me...I need to go on a taste-test!!

Summer Ross said...

That's a whole lot different cheese. My manly man loves cheese. I'll have to share your post with him.
~Summer

JoJo said...

Yum! I love most cheeses as long as they are made with cow's milk, although I will eat feta.

JoJo said...

Yum! I love most cheeses as long as they are made with cow's milk, although I will eat feta.

Annalisa Crawford said...

I didn't realise we had so many. I love that we're moving back into local production for some things.

yamini saha said...

Hi Hillary; yesterday you made me crave for bread today cheese. I haven't had half of them yet but do look forward to try whenever i get a chance.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Rhonda .. I'd have thought you'd have had farm shops .. but perhaps not a big enough population. But I agree strange for the dairy producing and sheep rearing NZ

@ Ros .. great you love the Cornish Yarg - I do too .. when I go down I'll promote it! The pub had it .. as it was one the cheeses we offered at my mother's memorial.

@ Yvonne - decent Cheddar is delicious ... but the plastic wrapped stuff is awful.

@ Patsy - oh yes - I was glad lunchtime came around today .. no cheese though!

@ Madeleine - I love goat's cheese .. hard or soft! The Stilton with apricots sounds very good though .. sorry about the slight lactose intolerance symptoms though -- thankfully not me!

@ Julie - isn't the range of cheeses just wonderful - such a fun idea ... and you could choose your own range - there are others .. this just had a Cornish name.

@ Elise - I'd join in the glass of vino and plate of cheese in the Pyrenees (one day!) ... sounds lovely and such a glorious view ..

@ Nick - I just love that people are prepared to stick their necks out and try new approaches ... we also need to get back to our farming roots. The wedding cheese - cake is incredible isn't it ..

@ Ida - Stinking Bishop is a very good one; more and more of us are going foraging now .. I had young nettles years ago in Ireland when I was visiting a friend ... slightly tart, but very tasty. I hope you do give some of the 'weeds' a try!

@ Elizabeth .. they're being inventive with the names now - and they resonate so much ..

@ Sarah - I've never been at a wedding or party where they've had a tiered cake made of cheese - but it looks good doesn't it.

I'd forgotten about Wallace and Gromit and their Wensleydale .. that was a great film ...

@ Keith - we'd love you to come and try the cheeses ... I'll join you!

@ Summer .. oh that'll be fun to hear about your manly man's thoughts on the post!

@ JoJo - Feta's good too .. but now-a-days it's often made with cows' milk ...

@ Annalisa - I have to say nor did I .. until I read the article .. and the local producers are doing a wonderful job - I'm pleased to say.

@ Yamini - I know .. it's a little unfair talking about food and drink .. oh well - you're learning some new things and that's good ..

Cheers to you all - Hilary

Bob Scotney said...

Do I let the side down if I say I like Danish Blue?

Rob Z Tobor said...

I love most decent cheese and am happy to try any and all I come across, my only real dislike is bland mass market cheddar cheese that looks and tastes of rubber. And I am not really a fan of cheese with added things like cranberries and nuts.

Rob Z Tobor said...

I love most decent cheese and am happy to try any and all I come across, my only real dislike is bland mass market cheddar cheese that looks and tastes of rubber. And I am not really a fan of cheese with added things like cranberries and nuts.

Teresa Coltrin said...

Me LOVES cheese -- any kind of cheese. Except I'm wondering if I'd like Stinking Bishop cheese. It looks good, but the name. :)

Roland D. Yeomans said...

Like Nick, I've never seen a wedding cheesecake before. Amazing post as always, Roland

Sean McLachlan said...

My personal fave is sharp, aged cheddar. A collegaue of mine at Gadling recently published Cheese for Dummies. Probably too basic for you but I'm going to get a signed copy at our next work meeting!

Betsy Brock said...

Oh, I do love cheese! Yum! I've never heard of a few of these...it's easy to get in a rut and go with what you're used to! Maybe I'll browse the cheese counter a while longer at the grocery this week!

C. Lee McKenzie said...

That cake is mouthwatering! And I will have to hunt down some of that Stinking Bishop if only to take a whiff.

Manzanita said...

Oh that lovely cheese wedding cake. It would almost be worth getting married again. THATS A JOKE
Nettles wrapping the Cornish Yarg. Stinging Nettles must grow everywhere. The stuff around here is about to pop and I always collect it.
(Wearing gloves, of course). I use it as medicine.

deborahjbarker said...

I am not a great cheese eater but the variety of names I find fascinating. I tend to stick to the tried and tested, Cheddar, Double Gloucester, Edam, Brie and those smoked apple cheeses that sound so nice. Stinking Bishop, however, does not tempt me in the slightest!
You are up to C and I have not yet read A. Thanks Hilary! :-)

Lynn said...

I love stinky cheese. :) Great C post!

Michael Offutt, S.F.A. said...

This post is like a fromage!

nutschell said...

I like cheese but oh my that cake has waay too much cheese! Probably not good for lactose intolerant folks :)
Nutschell
www.thewritingnut.com

Sania Heba said...

Me and cheese connect only when it's on top of a pizza. But this post was still great. As writers we need all the knowledge no?
P.S. thanks for dearKrissy's blog address. It helped a ton! :)

Julie Flanders said...

I LOVE cheese so this post made my mouth water. I'd love to try the Cornish yarg. What could be better than seaside holidays?
I think I'd probably pass on the stinking bishop though LOL.

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

Apologies, I can barely keep up with all of you doing the alphabet challenge. I will be so glad when normal service has resumed :)

Anyway, a topic after my heart and today, I shall leave a longer comment. Are you ready?

A blog about cheese? You Gouda been joking. I've never recovered from the fact that cottage cheese is apparently not made out of a cottage. Okay, let's get that old cheese joke out of the way. What cheese is 'made' backwards? 'Edam'.
I love cheese, the stronger, the stinkier, the better. If I open the pack and get an aroma that burns out my nostril hairs, that's a result. If I open up the pack and I am greeted with a pungent stench, reminiscent of socks that have been inside a pair of trainers, used in a frantic game of basketball, well that sends me to cheesy heaven.
Mild cheese? Forget it. To me, mild cheese is like eating glorified wax. No, I'd rather enjoy an exotic cheese. Heck, I have this urge for some Gorgonzola, which is an Italian blue cheese (and not, as I used to think, some female Greek mythical creature with sharp fangs, whose appearance, would turn anyone who looked at her, to turn to stone).
So just what have I learnt about cheese? Well, eating Stilton cheese will not make me seem taller. That eating blue cheese will not make me sad. That is not the law in Philadelphia that you must eat Philadelphia cream cheese. I'm going to end this 'cheesecurdling' comment very soon. I've got this urge to 'gorge' myself on some extra strong cheddar. Cheese please, anything but mild. Some cheese you must handle 'Caerphilly', because it crumbles so easily.

Happy alpheting, Hilary!

Gary :)

Silvia Villalobos said...

Cheese is one of my favorite foods. In Romania, where I grew up, feta cheese is big, and in Turkey (where I visited a couple of times), they serve it with watermelon. I know, I was suspicious at first, but the combo tastes so good.
A very enjoyable read.
Silvia @ Silvia Writes

Juliet Bond said...

Raw cheddar spread from our local farmer's market. Yes, please. Hi there! This is my first visit to your blog and I enjoyed it. Please visit us at http://citymusecountrymuse2012.blogspot.com/ and, if you like what you see, sign up to become a member.

Jo said...

Talking Caerphilly, not sure we can it in Canada, should check with my favourite deli store, they may even have Stinking Bishop. I had heard Britain had been introducing lots of new (old) cheeses again, I think it's wonderful. Not sure I would want a wedding cake of cheese though.

JO ON FOOD, MY TRAVELS AND A SCENT OF CHOCOLATE

Ella said...

I love cheese! You post is intriguing and making me long for a piece of that wedding cake ;D

I love the idea of cheese coated with Rosemary-yum!

900 options-wow!

Cheers!
:D

Val Poore said...

Wow, Hilary, another new titbit! I've never heard of Stinking Bishop despite loving the Wallace and Grommit films. A cheese I love but not well known is Dorset Blue Vinney. LIke Stilton only tangier if that's possible, but maybe it's the fondness of memory striking. I haven't had it in years!.

Tina said...

Oh Hil, you've put me into mourning. One of the things they're finding out about me is that I probably can't have dairy - it's doing a number on my asthma. I'm a total cheese snob! I usually have at least 6 or 7 varieties in my fridge, and my favorite dinner is wine, cheese, apples, and garlic bread...sigh. Just the mention of Stilton and 900 to choose from makes me want to cry...

Tina @ Life is Good
Co-host, April 2013 A-Z Challenge Blog
@TinaLifeisGood, #atozchallenge

Alexandra Heep said...

It's funny how cheese means different things in different countries. When I moved to the USA, I almost lost my taste for it because foods here come smothered with processed cheese. Oily, watery, stringy nasty stuff.

My favorites are Babybel and Feta.

Tracy Moore said...

I love cheese...therefore I love the post! I'll be back here to see what else you come up with.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Bob .. no because I know your Scandinavian love - and I started off loving Danish Blue Cheese ..

@ Rob - couldn't agree more about the bland mass market cheddar - it's disgusting. And I prefer cheese as is ..

@ Teresa - oh right me LOVES cheese too .. oh Stinking Bishop is delicious!

@ Roland - it's fun isn't it .. the piles of chesses ..

@ Sean - yes we can't fault sharp aged cheddar .. and lucky you getting that signed copy of Cheese for Dummies .. I'll keep a look out for the book ... yes, but people need information - especially youngsters ..

@ Betsy - yes I know we do with our comfort knowledge don't we .. enjoy your browsing .. and good selection I hope!

@ Lee - the cake makes a good centrepiece doesn't it .. and Stinking Bishop - they must make something similar ... or you'll have to come back for a visit to your grandparents' homeland!

@ Manzanita - a good party centrepiece too .. and getting married again would be a big joke!

The Cornish Yarg is delicious .. as well as the other flavours - great you're using the young nettles - I did when I was in Ireland years ago with a friend ..

@ Deborah - it's each to our own isn't it .. the smoked applewood was popular a few years ago and I'm sure is eaten a-plenty in the pubs! Sorry about the Stinking Bishop - it was a good name .. enjoy your reads ..

@ Lynn - a good cheese and fruit meal is so good ...

@ Michael - frothy fromage .. I can go with that ..

@ Nutschell - certainly not good for lactose intolerant folk .. thankfully I'm not one of those ..

@ Sania - some people love cheese, some it doesn't do much for them .. but that knowledge can always come in handy ..

@ Julie - ah! we'll have some good times together - then come over and we can try the Cornish Yarg over a glass ... and a seaside holiday! I'll enjoy the Stinking Bishop!

@ Gary - you're next .. but I need to pluck up courage ...

Cheers to you all .. Gary is tempting my brain power this evening .. he's next .. great to see and I'm so pleased you've enjoyed the post .. Hilary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Gary - special reply coming anon! This magnificent comment deserves it's own attention ...

@ Silvia - so pleased you like cheese - and I'm sure Romania has some excellent cheeses. The trips to Turkey sound interesting .. I'm all for cheese and fruits .. Watermelon is not something we get a lot of here .. but it's around .. and I love feta ...

@ Juliet - if you go to the Farmer's market that's great ... and a decent strength cheddar is delicious. Glad you enjoy your visit ..

@ Jo - I expect true Caerphilly is only available around Caerphilly ... but who knows it's worth trying new things. Artisan producers are popping up everywhere ... well the cheese cake could be a centre piece for an exhibition dinner ..

@ Ella - the wedding cake does look great doesn't it .. not sure how they slice it - probably individually ... but those little Innes buttons look delicious don't they .. and which of 900 will you choose!

@ Val - there are lots of cheese producers out there now .. the Dorset Blue Vinney rings a bell - but I used to work near a brilliant cheese shop in London - so I was always in there!! Any blue has its own tangy taste - glad you've remembered back to those times ..

@ Tina - sorry! don't go into mourning just yet. I gathered this might be one of the challenges for your asthma ... looks like your diet will be a-changing somewhat - I feel for you ...

Fresh apples off the tree, with a good cheddar, or traditional blue, and garlic or herby bread (I tend to make herby bread now-a-days) ...

Please cheer up - we need you!!!!

@ Alex - the States do have lots of processed cheeses don't they over their foods ... and baby bel and Feta - good for you ..

@ Tracy - that's great to see you around more often .. cheese is so cross-culture isn't it ...

Thanks so much to you all .. loved all your comments .. cheers Hilary

Clarissa Draper said...

I didn't realize there were so many cheeses. When I came to Mexico, I found cheeses here that were unknown to me in Canada.

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

We're big cheese eaters in our house. Right now we can't get enough of 5-year-old Balderson. Oh, so... yummy!

I'm taking note of your suggestions, Hilary. Maybe they're available here in Canada.

Soul Dipper said...

Hilary- you clever woman, what a great rundown of cheeses with uniqueness. (That's a mouthful!)

Good for Lamorna...she was not going to be stilted by tradition!

I'm trying to imagine a corporation today deciding upon a name. The person bringing "Stinking Bishop" to the table would be bopped in both ears! Love the (unforgettable) name!

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Now I want to go watch the Wallace and Gromit movie again to confirm that cheese!

Chatty Crone said...

I love cheese - dairy cheese - not goat cheese or stinky cheese !!!! lol sandie

Karen Tamara said...

now i'm hungry. I'm off to make some crackers with wine cheese. And perhaps a few chunks of sharp cheddar with an apple. Mmmm....

~Sia McKye~ said...

ooo, I wanna try some Cornish Yarg. Sounds delicious! Innes Buttons too! I'm familiar with all but one of the cheeses you mentioned in production. Hmm, must figure out how to get some of that Cornish Yarg...

Patricia Stoltey said...

I love cheese, and we have a couple of small cheese makers here in Northern Colorado that turn out very nice soft varieties I often buy at farmers' markets. I haven't tried making any cheese myself.

Tara Tyler said...

looove the aga, lovely piece & full of good memories!
bara had a fun tale with it
but now i want to watch wallace and gromit, cheeeeese!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Gary - your comment deserves a medal of cadbury's dairy cheese!

This little mouse is off to London today to see if she can catch the artists and Handel's ghosts munching some ancient cheeses amongst the floorboards.

I can't compete with the Caerphilly composed crumbly comment ...

That was great Gary - and I'm happy alpheting - Dripping today ...

Cheers to you - well perhaps Leek does a wondrous leaky cheese? Happy Thursday - Hilary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Clarissa - nor had I realised or known about so many cheeses. Mexico must have an amazing array of foods on offer, and so different to those in Canada.

@ Joylene - cheese meals are so wonderful ... simple yet so tasty .. but I use it with many things. Your 5 year old Balderson sounds interesting ..

I chose the cheeses because it was Cornish and then for their names!

@ Amy - good to see you .. there are so many now to choose from - we've had some amazing ones in Sussex ... and Lamorna is a village usually! .. or this wonderful display of cheeses.

A corporation choosing a name is one thing ... a small artisinal farm another with allowances made .. I love their names too ...

@ Alex - Wallace and Gromit - that makes sense!!

@ Sandie ... good quality cheese is always excellent isn't it ..

@ Karen Tamara - sounds good to me .. the apple first perhaps as it's early ..

@ Sia - that's amazing you know the cheeses ... and hope one day you find some Cornish Yarg - you could visit us?!

@ Patricia ... I haven't tried making cheese and wouldn't now .. but your local cheeses sound too good to miss out on ..

@ Tara -thanks re the Aga and the Bara ... and now the Cheese - I hadn't realised these really go together fairly well!!

Cheers to you all ... thanks for the comments .. Hilary

hyperCRYPTICal said...

I do so love cheese - bar that of the blue varieties.

Strong mature cheddar is my personal favourite - positive it is made of milk from cows who reside in Paradise.

Anna :o]

Dani Jax said...

Who knew all this great stuff about cheese!? So many choices.
Dani & Jax @ Cover Girls

Sara said...

Okay, this post should come with the following warning: DO NOT READ THIS IS YOU HAVEN'T HAD LUNCH.

My stomach was growling by the time I finished reading this post and looking at the yummy pictures.

Did I say I like cheese. I do, but can't eat too much:~)

Great informative post, as usual:~)

Theresa Milstein said...

I LOVE cheese. Thanks for pointing out a few I've never heard of.

Munir said...

Yes "Paneer" was our home made Cheese. My son in Hawaii was so fascinated by the method that he tried it himself. The thing is that it had to used up fast enough because in India we did not have a refrigerator.

Patricia said...

Our farmer's market has lots and lots of homemade cheeses now and then of course we have micro breweries everywhere and wine start ups. As a person who can not eat cheese - I love to look at the artisan's work and hope they do well

Interesting post Hilary Thank you

Lisa said...

I love cheese. That's all I have to say. I'd rather have cheese than meat!

Deniz Bevan said...

Loving your A-Z series. I think I love all British cheeses. Try to taste new ones on every visit!
Dripping and toast I haven't tried yet - I'd like to though!

Susanne Drazic said...

A wedding cake made of cheese? How interesting. It does look quite festive.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Anna - well I love them all! Strong flavoursome cheddar I love too and I'd concur to it being made from cows who reside in paradise!

@ Dani and Jax - there are so many varieties out there .. it was fun to read up about these cheeses.

@ Sara - sorry about the lack of WARNING!! I write these things and it's difficult sometimes - sadly I think we all need to hold back when the cheeses come out ...

@ Theresa - me too .. and it's so easy to eat more than I need .. glad you enjoy ed the post ..

@ Munir - I don't think I've ever had paneer - though I'd like to see and explore the taste.

I don't know enough about cheese-making .. but we drain our curds through cheese-cloths here. Even reading about it - I still can't quite make it out the difference ..

@ Patricia - you're in the right part of the world for your farm and outlets .. micro breweries and wine producers .. wonderful to have around.

Sorry about not being able to eat cheese .. but appreciation of good workmanship is just as important though ..

@ Lisa - quite often so would I .. but at times a good roast is delicious ... but cheeses and salads lots of them please.

@ Deniz - delighted you're enjoying the posts - well there's over 900 - so lots of visits required .. perhaps we'll meet up sometime?!

Toast and Dripping - now that's delicious ...

@ Susanne - it's a great idea for cheeses isn't it .. I loved it when I saw one advertised a few years ago ..

Thanks so much to you all - cheers and enjoy the A-Z in the week ahead .. Hilary

Sue Travers said...

Cheese-making has enjoyed a surge in popularity here as well along with micro-breweries and "boutique" winemakers. There are so many creative people around willing and able to research 'not quite lost' arts!
cheers
Sue

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Sue .. I think the entrepreneurial foodies, chocolatiers, brewers and vintners are a wonderful addition to our lives - long may they succeed.

Like you I hope they revive many arts and crafts - all versions ..

Cheers Hilary