Tuesday, 11 November 2014

BloodSwept Lands and Seas of Red … the Memorial Artwork Display at the Tower of London …



Today is Armistice Day ... 

The Cenotaph, Whitehall on Remembrance Sunday
2010

At the Paul Cummins’ factory in Derby the ceramicists worked round the clock to make each of the 888,246 poppies, by hand, that will, by 11th November, complete the installation, fill the dry moats.


The carpet of poppies, spilling from the tower and sweeping around its base, has drawn praise for its dignity and creativity.



Each poppy represents a British and colonial life lost in the First World War.



A few days after I visited the Tower and this amazing poppy display … Ailsa Craddock wrote in The Saturday Times: “there were thousands of spectators looking on – I have never been in such a large crowd of well-behaved, interested and caring people from all cultures, nations and ages”.



Mrs Craddock was one of the volunteers selected to plant some of the ceramic poppies in the Moat – so she had an even better take on events, than I did.


The army of volunteers who turned out in all weathers to make sure the poppies were planted on time – grandmothers, students, civil servants, airline cabin crew, injured soldiers, holders of the Victoria Cross, charity workers …
The Waterfall filling the moat, slowly


… people of every colour and creed and every walk of life, united by a desire to take part in one of the most eye-catching installations ever mounted in London.


In the room where the volunteers assemble – some 19,000+ to date – a map shows where they have all come from.  There are red dots everywhere: Australia, the Philippines, Japan, China, Alaska, Peru, Finland, Dubai … there is even one in Siberia.



The Tower of London before the installation
of poppies
Most of the crowds were in family groups talking softly about those whose memory they had come to commemorate.  Older people explaining to young children the circumstances in which their far-distant relatives had died. 


The young will greater appreciate the significance of the period and that dreadful War, after visiting this display, and remembering through their own family histories.




Each day as the sun went down, a yeoman warder read a roll call of names who had fallen during the War, a bugler played the Last Post.  A hush fell among the crowds … 180 requested names were read out …




Tom Piper, who planned and constructed this sixteen acre display of poppies … a single poppy for a single life … it has taken three months to ‘plant’ every ceramic poppy – creating his memorial artwork, which has finally established itself in the public mind.


Piper, a set designer, who is acclaimed for his work with the Royal Shakespeare Company, came to the project after artist Paul Cummins, who created the first commemorative ceramic bloom, asked if he’d like to collaborate.



In discussion about the installation, Piper has said that he’s learnt not to illustrate the themes of a play with the obvious … thus here it is about loss and commemoration, which has given us all in our own distinct appreciative instinct - a way to tap into the War … back to our family history, or just a realisation of the enormity of it all ….


War Horse - came to give
some nostalgia for the animals
in World War One

The timing of 100 years since the start of that appalling conflict, and the fact technology has raced ahead … many more are now exploring their family trees and unearthing the true stories of their ancestors … filling in some of the blanks from distant days …




A few poppies have been held back for that key date today … the 11th hour of the 11th day, of the 11th month: Armistice Day …


The display does look beautiful … but if we/you contemplate that each poppy within that amazing art work does represent someone’s lost life during World War One … perhaps not appreciated in such full comprehension … the Bloody Sea will have done its job.


I’m not sure if because I went at half-term, or for some reason I used the blood red runs to illustrate the Tower’s potency in myHalloween post … the effect has seeped into my memory.


There are six Service charities that will benefit from the purchase of each poppy … someone I know bought six for their local church – to be used on Remembrance Day in the future and for other appropriate events.


Neither the designer, nor the artist have profited from the creation … and it is hoped that the two major sculptural components – the wave, and the waterfall from the Tower window – can be sold to raise extra funds.


Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red is a unique art installation … which from the first poppy being planted in August, to the visits by the Queen and Royal Family, to other Service personnel, the volunteers who have planted the poppies – who have all watched this amazing ‘painting by numbers’ fulfil its potential.


Planted poppies - to be filled in with many
more poppies to create a 'carpet' effect
There was no idea as to how the concept would turn out, to how it would look … it was not a prescriptive painting – or painting by dots …. it took on a world of its own – which has really caught the public’s imagination.


I wasn’t going to see it – but on advice, thought I should make the effort … and effort it was as my post explained!  but it has opened my eyes in many a different direction.  An interesting experience …

'The Wave' cascading in from
the River Thames - blood red river

There is talk now of leaving it up … but I hope they stick with their decision to start the dismantling process … it was an opportunity, just not taken up by many, who now wish they had: an opportunity cut short – yet reflects the lives of those opportunities denied.


The coming week will let us know … the poppies have turned out to be a dignified tribute – one that will be remembered by this nation for many a decade to come.

Wikipedia's picture for today:
Papaver Rhoeas (bud, flower and fruit (capsule))
PS:  It is being kept until the end of the month … but the grass needs mowing, the dry moats now have soggy,  muddy bottoms … and it will slowly start being dismantled – the purchased poppies dispatched, some of the art work sent around the UK, with ultimately the two sculptures – the wave, and the waterfall – finding their final resting place at the Imperial War Museum in London and Manchester.


Two other things … the transport challenges have been met with better signage, which I certainly didn’t see on my recent trip just before Halloween … and when we donate for our poppy, once pinned on to our jackets, shirts etc …the oak leaf should be set at eleven o’clock – I hadn’t realised that before.

Apparently the idea came from a poem Paul Cummins read - from an unknown soldier, who did not return, but sent these emotive words home ... here visually recreated 100 years later ... 


Another PS - perhaps I should add that I believe it was 20 million human beings, who each lost their life in World War One ... it was a real world war.  As Trisha mentioned below ... an estimate of 55 million lost their lives in both World Wars.



Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspiration Stories

65 comments:

Nilanjana Bose said...

Hi Hilary,

It is completely breath-taking. Very beautiful and dignified. Thanks for the pics too, took me there.

Have a great Tuesday.
Nila.

Out on the prairie said...

They were on the national news here last night. Such a fitting tribute and very unique. I will go hear that bugler play today, toast a few and tell stories with a few.

Mike Goad said...

Quite amazing. Wonderful tribute. Separated by so much time, it's difficult for most today to understand the sacrifice.

Sue McPeak said...

Stunning tribute. Thank-you for sharing this post and it's incredible history, it's present installation and story, and it's future for all nations and generations to hold close to their hearts and minds. There is much to be said for 'World Peace'.
Sue at CollectInTexas Gal

Vanessa Morgan said...

So many poppies. It's beautiful. Unfortunately, they remind us of a sad part of our history.

Julie Flanders said...

Just the photos of this display are so touching to me, I can't imagine seeing it in person. I think here in the US the first World War is forgotten somewhat but I know in Europe that is not the case at all. So haunting and such a tragic loss of life.

Jo said...

I find this a most incredible display and am sorry it has to be dismantled even if I understand why. The reading of the names of the dead sent chills down my back. I too would love to have seen those poppies in person. That poem by an unknown soldier is also very moving.

Excellent post Hilary. By the way, our poppies don't have oakleaves, I just double checked. Turns out in the States they don't use poppies much anyway according to one blogger friend.

mail4rosey said...

You've done a wonderful job with your write-up. The poppies are beautiful, and it's so wonderful that so many have come together in unity to remember.

Stephen Tremp said...

Hilary, this has been all over the news. Its been fun, and touching to the heart, to watch. My grandfather on my Mom's side was in WWI and fought in France.

I don't think there are any survivors from the War To End All Wars remaining. So what an amazing way to Never Forget.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Good thing they started early and now only have a couple to plant today. Such an amazing sight.

TexWisGirl said...

it's just an amazing and touching display. truly a remarkable undertaking.

Robyn Campbell said...

Hil, how beautiful the poppies are but how how sad too. War horse is my favorite part of this post. The roll call has to be so very touching. The donation and the oak leaf is just so lovely. More homeschooling history. I am indebted to you, my friend. xoxo

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nila - I'm glad my words and the images I used described the whole - it's been very interesting to watch the unfolding of this incredible memorial art-work ...

@ OOTP - thanks for letting me know about the coverage - I'm quite pleased to know. Hearing the Bugler play would be amazing and so heart-stopping - even watching on tv has been tear jerking. So glad you appreciated the display ...

@ Mike - thank you .. so good to see you. How someone can conceive this sort of installation amazes me - but the poem does tell us.

I don't think that today we can understand the sacrifice of 100 years ago, or 65-70 years ago ... unless we have serving members of the family ... this does something to ameliorate that distance of time ...

@ Sue - thanks .. I was glad I wrote out how the whole came about ... and know that what's here in here is for us to refer to in future days ... as you say World Peace would be truly incredible ...

@ Vanessa - yes and for you in Belgium ... many were lost on those fields. They do remind us of a sad part - but one that had to be gone through for us to be free ... this memorial at least allows us to remember and salute their bravery ...

@ Julie - that's right we always remember the First World War and always on Remembrance Sunday .. the 11th day of the 11th month in November at 11.00 am .. a poignant time.

The display is haunting isn't it .. and I'm glad I've been able to capture its story ...

@ Jo - I quite agree with you ... and I'm glad you were able to get over and read the poem - makes the memorial artwork display more understandable doesn't it ..

Most of our poppies have the oakleaf - they're ones on offer every November by the Royal British Legion ... I see the one depicted in Wiki - the leaf is at 1.00am!

Some of ours don't have a leaf now ... but I've seen a few blog posts from American friends where poppies are still popular as symbols of remembrance ....

@ Rosey - many thanks - and it's incredible how many people have come to visit the installation .. I'm glad I went.

@ Stephen - yes, I'm gathering the Memorial is getting coverage around the globe. I hope your grandfather survived .. perhaps he did ...

There are no survivors from that War now ... this memorial really does as you say "We Will Never Forget" ...

@ Alex - all carefully planned and methodically worked out - but sounds like they were pushing their time limit every day ... still the last one went in at 11.00 am on the 11th day of this 11th month ... 100 years on ...

It is an incredible sight ...

@ TWG - I think you said it all .. it's been an interesting experience ... to have seen recently and then to have gathered the information for this post ...

@ Robyn - I've done it again? I must be good at home schooling!

Various famous people, celebrities came to visit at close range, not like the populace who kept a distance! But I'd have loved to have been there when War Horse turned up ...

War Horse with some of his actors performed at the Festival of Remembrance at the Royal Albert Hall, which is always put on prior to Remembrance Sunday ...

Thanks everyone - so glad you appreciated the post .. and I'm glad I was able to find out more ... Hilary

M Pax said...

It is a humbling and emotion-tugging memorial. It's just stunning and dumbfounding. All those lives.

Paula Kaye said...

What an amazing memorial. I would have loved to have seen this in person....

Karen Lange said...

Just amazing, and a wonderful memorial to those who gave so much for our freedom. I am grateful to the men and women who have served and currently serve, and to their families as well. Thank you for sharing this, Hilary. Have a wonderful week!

Munir said...

Today is Veterans day for us here in the USA. We live very close to the West Point Academy and we see several young men in the fatigues. I just pray to God that there are no more wars.

Morgan said...

Wow! Hilary, stunned by this post! You always post the most beautiful pictures… love this. What a beautiful day today is… <3

Southpaw HR Sinclair said...

The photo of the cascading poppies is breathtaking and the one of the yeoman is stunning.

Theresa Milstein said...

I think the poppies capture the loss beautifully. I love when mankind can reflect after tragedy and turn it into art. I wish we'd create fewer tragedies.

Thanks for sharing the photos.

Suze said...

A friend of mine sent me a card with poppies on the cover for my birthday this year. She's posted on both World Wars, today--an interesteing synchronicity.

Ann Best said...

This is a truly impressive post, my friend. Words just can't do justice to the emotions of it all.

You may have found this link...a broader view of the "weeping window." It made me gasp.
http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/07/world/europe/tower-of-london-poppies/index.html?hpt=wo_c2

I'm thinking of the poem "In Flanders Fields" by John McRae, World War I poet and physician. It's my all-time favorite. You no doubt have seen it...? http://www.greatwar.co.uk/poems/john-mccrae-in-flanders-fields.htm

Many ((( ))) on this historic day from your friends across the pond ... !!!

Joyce Lansky said...

These are beautiful.

http://joycelansky.blogspot.com/2014/11/ww-oh-look-at-that-little-pumpkin-face.html

Dianne K. Salerni said...

It really is a stunning and moving display. But yes, something that must come down. The very short-lived nature of it symbolizes all those lives lost before their time. But I am sure the people who went to see it in person will never forget it.

Denise Covey said...

What a display. I probably won't get to see it, but it is certainly inspirational and what a celebration of the fallen. We had our own commemorations in Australia of course, but no one does pomp quite like the Brits!

Denise :)

Lisa Moles said...

What an amazing display. I can only imagine how moving it must have been to see the vast number of poppies, knowing what they represent. I'm so glad you got to see it and share it with us.

Janie Junebug said...

The poppies have a somber beauty.

Love,
Janie

Empty Nest Insider said...

The "carpet of poppies" is such a breathtaking sight! It's amazing how much work went into this stunning display honoring WWI soldiers. I'm so glad you were able to see this historical event in person, Hilary. Thanks for going to great lengths to share it with us.

Julie

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Mary – it’s certainly touched many a heart, and is stunning … took my breath away …

@ Paula – I’m very glad I went up to see it and get a feel …

@ Karen – it’s a talking point and that’s important, bringing back a hundred years ago .. so we can remember. War is definitely terrible, but a necessity at times .. I’m glad you appreciated the post.

@ Munir – like all of us – we join you in wishing there were no more wars – and Peace reigned.

@ Morgan – good to see you … thank you – being a dancer I expect you can see the whole, better than we can in some ways. The photos this time weren’t mine – but they reflect the scene …

@ Holly – the ‘waterfall’ from the Tower window is breathtaking .. and the Yeoman – again not mine this time ..

@ Theresa – it’s turned out to be a very evocative work of art … and will be a talking point for schools and organisations for many a day to come. I agree if only we could share things, and not want things purely for selfish reasons.

@ Suze – poppies are ethereal and give us wonderful displays – perfect for birthday cards. The wars are featuring a lot at the moment … there’s much to learn and to remember …

@ Ann – I’m pleased that you and Jen have understood and appreciated the post. I will have to look at the links … and I posted the poem “In Flanders Fields” in another Remembrance Day post … it is definitely a favourite … and has been recited this year … as have other poet’s works from the WW1 days … so descriptive of those times …

@ Joyce – good to see you here – thank you

@ Dianne – it is a stunning display and today will be slowly dismantled – a transient memorial to lives that were transient and cut short in their prime. The crowds are piling in and I expect still for a while yet …

@ Denise – sadly you won’t as it is immediately being taken down … however the sculptures will be on display at two of our museums … and you’re right no-one does pomp and ceremony like we do.

@ Lisa – thank you so much for coming by … and I’m so pleased you appreciated me sharing the memorial with you …

@ Janie – the reflective mood of the crowds prevailed …

@ Julie – it does look like a carpet … yet I liked the view through the ‘stalks’ … and it was a lot of work and thought … and serious decision making by the Royal Historic Palaces to give the go-ahead. I’m glad I went, but also that I wrote it up for us all who visit this blog …

Thanks so much everyone – yesterday was a special Remembrance in many ways … Hilary

Lisa said...

I've loved all your posts on this subject and even told my family about them because my mother hadn't heard of the "poppies" custom of today. I'm sending her the link to this post so she can see what I was trying to explain. You do a much better job of that!!!

L. Diane Wolfe said...

My husband hadn't heard about the poppies so I had to show him pictures last night. It was such a huge undertaking.

L.G. Smith said...

Amazing display. When I first saw the photos I thought they'd been photoshopped. What a great way to honor those who gave their lives and who still serve. Beautiful.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

It is so beautiful and sad and touching. It really displays the scope of the loss in those massive conflicts. Yesterday was Veterans Day for us and I always find it a sad day.

Crystal Collier said...

I saw one other post about these once, and I was delighted and inspired by it. Can you imagine creating that many little reminders? Awe-inspiring.

Unleashing the Dreamworld

dolorah said...

It was an amazing and inspiring concept. Loved the quote about a well behaved crowd.

Patricia Stoltey said...

I had not heard about this amazing poppy display, Hilary. It must have been breathtaking. Quite a few of my family members, including my father, served during World War II. My family members all survived, but so many of their friends did not. Memorials like this always bring tears to my eyes.

David P. King said...

I had the privilege of visiting the WWI memorial in Kansas City, MS this year. Amazing to look back at history and what has happened since 100 years ago. May this be a reminder to us all.

SA Larsenッ said...

Wow. Poppies will forever hold a different meaning for me. Thank you for sharing this and making me more informed. Great piece!

Patsy said...

The poppies are so beautiful.

Chatty Crone said...

I have a couple other friends from England sent me some information on this. This celebration is fabulous. I looked at the video of how they were made and each one was made by hand. I think they were gorgeous just like the ceremony. You do things right there.

bazza said...

Hello Hilary. There some things that the British seem to be able to do better than any other nation....and this is one of them. The mood of Britain and the world was captured here and your post, as ever, gives more background and insight than I had previously. It's a wonderful story!
PS: I've been a bit busy lately but I always read your posts even if I don't always comment.
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s fabulous Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Rosalind Adam said...

I really was hoping to get down to see this amazing tribute but time has got the better of me yet again. It certainly looks breathtaking from above.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lisa – thanks Lisa .. delighted that your mother is prepared to read this post – I hope it enlightens her. Interesting to know that she hadn’t heard of Poppy Day – Remembrance Day here …

@ Diane – interesting that your hubby too hadn’t heard about our poppies and the art work … it was a huge undertaking …

@ LG – nope can’t do photoshopping! It seems to have made a very big impact … and does honour those who gave their lives, and those who still serve …

@ Susan – Remembrance Day here always brings tears to my eyes … for all those who died, and all who have served and aided us to be free …

@ Crystal – it is inspiring isn’t it – and having the vision to create the little reminders …

@ Donna – my travel up in the train and the crowds around the Moat, at the Tower etc were all so respectful of each other …

@ Pat – it was breath-taking .. a quite extraordinary feat of artistic creation … yes my parents and grandparents all served, lost their life, or had many friends who did … and like you I always have a tear or two in my eyes …

@ David – it is a privilege to be a part of a Memorial visit .. and to be able to stand quietly, reflect and remember all who were serving their country … we certainly need to remember how difficult life was back then and what they suffered and went through for us …

@ Sherri – it was an amazing reflective piece .. and many of us will remember Armistice Day in a different light …

@ Patsy – the art-work was amazing ..

@ Sandie – yes they are hand-made … and somehow our traditions shine through on ceremonies like these – thanks for coming back …

@ Bazza – I agree we do seem get the ‘Show’ right and touch many hearts. I’m pleased I’ve ‘recorded’ the story of the poppies and the art-work here .. it is a wonderful story. It’s good to see you – and if there’s no post – then you’re busy!

@ Ros – I’m sorry you couldn’t get to the Tower to see the display in person … but as you say you’ve seen it on tv and in the papers etc …

Thanks everyone – they were already dismantling the poppies ready for dispatch yesterday … it was meant to be a transient work of art … and such it is … Hilary

Trisha F said...

It was an appalling number who died during that war - though I believe including WWII took the numbers up to around 55 million between the two wars. Horrific.

It's amazing to think that 100 years have passed since WWI began.

Rhonda Albom said...

Hilary, this is so cool. It must have been really amazing to see it live. Wish I could have been there. Nice tribute.

Gattina said...

The poppies around the tower look so beautiful !
We didn't have a lot of celebrations in Belgium, to be honest I haven't seen one !

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente said...

I would loved to have seen that display of poppies, it was amazing and meant so much to many people.

We had a church service here in our little village in France on Tuesday. A public holiday here. This was followed by a service at the memorial with the army in attendance. The very small children from the local school sang the French national anthem. This was followed by a drink in the hall with a display of WW1 items, all owned by one person, and from his private museum. We then retired to the local barn where a meal was arranged by the local women.

Many memories and emotional feelings during the day.

Keep well Diane

beste barki said...

Hilary, as always, reading your blog I felt like I was experiencing things first hand. Salut, Beste

Sara said...

Like others said, I thank you for sharing this! It is amazing and beautiful, even with it's sad purpose. You are right, we need to look past the "bloody sea" and recognize each flower to be a life lost. You said this very well.

Your voice in this post is so very powerful, Hilary. This is more than a history lesson; it's a heart-felt reminder of what war leaves behind that can never be brought back again.

However, I agree with your about it coming down. Even as beautiful and potent it is, it would fade and become something more common if it stayed. But as is, it's like seeing an amazing act of nature ('tho man-made). It needs to stay in our memories, rather than fading and sinking in mud.

Well done, Hilary and I am glad you went to see this:`)

Inger said...

It is such a shame that we still have these horrific conflicts in our world, where we only live for such a very short time. I saw a segment on the national news here about the ceramic poppies. And I knew about them from reading your earlier post. To see them spread out all around the Tower was amazing though.

Christine Rains said...

Beautiful to see all the poppies and sad as well. Thank you for sharing.

Tammy Theriault said...

I love the photo with the poppies coming down out of the castle window. amazing!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Trisha - I added in your note about the 55 million altogether ... however high the number, or low, it's such a terrible tragedy of life - as you say horrific.

So much has happened in 100 years hasn't it .. and yes it was only 100 years ago ...

@ Rhonda - many thanks - you'd have taken some wonderful photos .. but I'm glad I went ... and glad to have the info here as a 'record' ...

@ Gattina - the whole art-work was incredible; They had a big commemoration service at Ypres .. and I'm sure there were Services at the War Memorials in the villages - we can miss them though.

@ Diane - The two of you would have loved walking around the Tower ...

I saw the Commemorative Service in France - as they haven't succumbed to changing the day to the nearest Sunday. It must mean a lot to France ... and it sounds as though it is a gathering of the community to remember. Your 'small' remembrance sounds perfect ...

Many memories and yes very emotional ...

@ Beste - appreciate your thoughts and its good to see you ...

@ Sara - this comment is really kind and thoughtful - I'm happy I can convey these sorts of thoughts in my posts ...

They started taking it down very early the next day ... which I'm sure is the right decision - a transient display for so many very short lives cut in their prime ...

Yes - I'm pleased I visited .. thanks.

@ Inger - I agree we should be allowed, as humans, to live our lives and chart our own course - not to have to endure others' wars ... but we need to encourage peace ...

The news journalists took this story up and spread the artistic creation around the globe ... it's touched many a heart ...

@ Christine - yes beautiful and sad ...

@ Tammy - the whole is 'a shock' ... the wave and the cascade just reflect the flow of war: dead and dying ...

Thank you everyone - it's been a poignant week ... Hilary

Susan Kane said...

A right and amazing tribute to the fallen...this was stunning. It is a hope that all, from many nations, can see the destruction of lives of such a conflict

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

What an amazing display, and it's mind-boggling how many volunteer hours went into making it happen. A true labor of love. For those who sacrificed all a century ago to still be remembered and honored today is beyond awe-inspiring.

Here, instead of the November 11 being Armistice Day, and specifically for honoring the soldiers of WWI, it's become Veterans Day, and a day to honor all who have served.

A wonderful post. Thanks for sharing your pictures of those poppies. It must have been an unbelievable thing to see in person.

Cheers!

Julia Hones said...

What a lovely tribute to their loved ones...
When I think of the year 1914 I also think of all the remarkable people who were born that year. Writers, poets, musicians. What a paradox... It never ceases to amaze me that so many people that I enjoy reading were born in 1914...
My paternal grandfather as also born in 1914...

Susanne Drazic said...

Hilary, thank you for sharing about this. A beautiful tribute for all of the fallen soldiers.

Suzanne Furness said...

I would have liked to visit and see the poppies but sadly I didn't make it up to London. My husband did though when he was up there and took some photos. We have bought one of the poppies so will treasure this when it arrives.

I also didn't realise the significance of the leaf on the poppy pointing to 11 o'clock, I will remember that next year.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan - you're right it has set many nations talking about what it all means ..

@ Susan - the project has been taken on by so many - yet those volunteers have experienced something really special ... I understand about Veterans Day in the US .. all the countries vary slightly ...

I'm very pleased I went up and saw the whole effect and experienced all the visitors and that crowd murmuration ..

@ Julia - the art work has certainly impressed many and the cities are putting in requests ... so that part of the display can be lent to them for a short exhibition period ...

1914 - interesting that you relate so strongly to that first year of the War, especially as your paternal grandfather was also born then. What I have come to realise is how creative War can be ... lots of works of art, ideas, literature, music, science, engineering are explored and developed ... from the experience of War ..

@ Susanne - I'm glad you enjoyed reading about this and what the art work encompasses ...

@ Suzanne - I'm glad your husband managed to see the display - your kids will appreciate his photos and descriptions. How fantastic that you've bought one of the poppies - I can quite understand you'll treasure it ...

Interesting about the significance of the poppy oak leaf kept at 11.00 am - I now keep looking and see most peoples' set at 1.00 am or somewhere else ...

Thanks to you four Susan/nes with or without the Z ... have happy wet weekends .. Hilary

Juliet Batten said...

What a powerful piece of work this is Hilary. So glad you could see it and do this post. It is an extraordinary vision, and so well executed. Thank you.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Juliet - it seems to have become more than the designer and creative artist realised it would be .. the people sort of took it up as their own ...

I think it will be visionary art-work held in the minds of many of us for years to come ...

Glad you were able to be here and see this ... cheers Hilary

scarlett clay said...

Isn't that gorgeous! What a beautiful and emotional display!

Bossy Betty said...

I love going on trips with you. A beautiful tribute.

Lynn said...

I saw these poppies on the news - just spectacular! What a lovely idea.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Scarlett - yes it was surprisingly effective - even standing in the drenching rain! But I'm glad I was able to visit and record it here on the blog ...

@ Betty - well your Australian trip was pretty fantastic ... and glad you appreciated this tribute ...

@ Lynn - they seem to have been on the world's news ... and were as you say 'spectacular' ... and a brilliantly conceived piece of work ..

Cheers and thanks for visiting - Hilary