Friday, 9 January 2015

Bones of Good Contention!



After so many of your comments about the ‘horror’ of having bones in your meal – be it fish pie or other … I thought I really needed to address the goodness of ’dem bones!!


Star Gazey Pie see here

Most of the information in this post will have come from PaleoLeap … and really enlightened me … so please pop over and look at all the goodies found in ’dem (our) bones.


The classic statement … do not judge a book by its cover: is so appropriate to bones.  Locked away inside that hard shell is a wealth of essential nutrients …

You need more bones, onions, leeks ... for a good bone broth

  • Anti-inflammatory and gut-healing proteins
  • Healthy fats, and
  • A wealth of minerals just waiting to be used.



Wild animals always go for the bones … but we – after our evolutionary changes - need to utilise our clever human brain to devise ways to access the boney goodness.


from the Colon Club
www.coloncancersupport.colonclub.com 

My mother always used to have a stock pot on the go … bones and joints would go in and the resultant stock would be used for soups, sauces, gravies … waste not want not – was definitely a maxim when I was growing up.  




Where bones went to after that – not on the compost heap, and we had no dog … perhaps into the chicken run … just not sure!


That broth made from the bones continues to help strengthen our skeletal system … and heals us in times of fever …

T-bone steak .. with a
little marrow

The best roast … is the joint roasted on the bone ... all the goodness is sealed in … the resultant pan juices are an added luxury … while the bone will give that broth a rich dark glow of luxury.


We all know what Chicken Soup for the Soul can do … two years ago when I was malingering with a mighty virus and felt ‘frot’ … when I eventually got myself out to buy some fodder – the first thing I did was buy a whole chicken, some leeks, an onion, a couple of carrots, some potatoes … with the much needed goal of making Chicken Soup for the Soul …


… a one pot chicken wonder pot … and I did feel better!  Whole chicken, all the veg chopped and added, half fill with water and gently simmer til done … the meat will come away from the bones … but there’s that lovely jelly-like stock … all good for the body system: lots of servings with no extra work …



Our digestion is helped with bone broth …

Roasted Leg of Lamb with the marrow
from the leg bone showing

As the site says ... bone marrow is criminally delicious – I’d agree … it wasn’t around much when I was growing up – but came back into fashion ... and is really so tasty.  It’s also full of essential nutrients.


Minerals too are found in bones ... we all need calcium, magnesium, potassium and phosphorous, while fish bones also contain iodine.  All these mineral goodies are in the bones or, on cooking, are leached out into the stock … which is why it is so good … or the roasting pan dishes are just superb and make excellent gravy.




There are other benefits … the proteins are anti-inflammatory … helping with wound healing … the fats are good too – we need some fat … it melts down and we can use it for thickening sauces, gravies etc …




Using those bones can save us money, and they stretch a joint into a few meals … or as in this verse:


Vicarage Mutton:

Hot on Sunday
Cold on Monday
Hashed on Tuesday
Minced on Wednesday
Curried on Thursday
Broth on Friday
Cottage Pie on Saturday



Check out the Paleo Site … and any of those early cookery books where recommendations for invalid cookery always suggest chicken soup … and it certainly was what I craved when I was struck down two years ago with that very nasty bug …

Fresh vegetables and meat bones ready
to be made into stock


So those bones are essential to us – they keep us alive … while we can trace our early ancestors, as their bones reveal so much about their history …




This post I wrote nearly 5 years ago goes into the detail re the investigations made to establish the whys and wherefores of skeletons found in Stirling Castle … what they ate, where they came from, and their ‘job’ … from their muscle development …


Roasting bones with marrow

The questions asked in the comments were also very enlightening and I had to do some homework!  But add to the post … 





The Paleo site ... "Eat This: Bone Broth"



Bred in the bone ... a saying "what's bred in the bone will come out in the flesh".  A natural propensity cannot be repressed ... it's a part of our nature. 

Chicken casserole - giving soup
for the soul


Our bones make us ... yet we need the nutrients from those animals we’ve surpassed as our brain has become bigger … and we’ve moved from being hunter gatherers into the human beings we are today.




Do not contend with your bones …!!

Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories 


59 comments:

loverofwords said...

Just read on the web site for GERD, how good bone broth is for a sensitive tummy. I am off to the market to get my self some soup bones. Thanks for the reminder, in such a classy way.

dolorah said...

Hmm, perhaps I should buy a chicken and boil the whole thing. I could use some good side effects right now :)

Out on the prairie said...

I used to make all my broths. My butcher saved bones for me to use and I always bought some neck bones from him to complete the broth. Have a chicken on the boil for noodles tomorrow. Comfort food when it is cold.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

I always use ham bones to make stock but I seldom have beef. I haven't made chicken stock for a few years. Now I recall how much good food I could make from a whole chicken.

Jo said...

Ooh, Marrow. My mother used to serve it on toast at teatime and it was delicious. Haven't hat that in years. Used to give it to the dogs at one time. I always made broths this way although I do tend to buy pre-made broth these days. Small kitchen, etc.Always prefer roasts (joints) on the bone they are much more flavourful too. Just think, too, of oxtail soup (beef tail here) which was always so delicious. Not so easy getting the bones these days with the advent of supermarkets where the butchers don't cut meat any more but it arrives pre-packaged. Had home made chicken noodle last night, deeelicious.

Clarissa Draper said...

I love your ideas for soups and recipes. I think having the bones are so important.

Carole Anne Carr said...

So many memories... I know Mother's routine began with washing on Monday and there was always cold mutton left over from the day before, too... wonderful post. It was a disgrace to be seen washing on Sunday!

Jen Forbes said...

Actually, whenever I'm sick with a cold especially a head or chest congestion I go from the doctors right to a local restaurant that prepares soup for me. The lady has known me for 25 years and makes a soup especially for me with a spicy broth, (chilies) veggies, noodles, fish with bones and a beef bone with the marrow which is fabulous for ones health.(its a Korean restaurant) After a large bowl of that I'm usually good for a few hours or at least until I'm done filling my medications and getting back to the house.

Christine Rains said...

I have to remember how good bone broth is for sensitive tummies. What a wonderfully interesting post as usual. Have a lovely weekend! :)

Betsy Brock said...

I guess we eat the meat and give the dog the best part! ha.

L.G. Smith said...

Fee-fi-fo-fum,
I smell the blood of an Englishman,
Be he live, or be he dead
I'll grind his bones to make my bread.

Happy New Year, Hilary! :)

Munir said...

My husband sure loves this post of yours.
ME? you will have to excuse me this time. I tend to eat mostly vegetables. May be chicken. But I do cook for my hubby.
Bones? only if I have to. Pardon me please !

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

The only bones I eat on purpose are the ones in canned salmon. But I agree about meat cuts with the bone still in are the best and tastiest, and one of the best things about having chicken or turkey is using the carcass to make soup. Matter of fact, we had bean soup for dinner tonight, made all that much better because of a big ol' meaty hambone.

Happy New Year!

Robyn Campbell said...

I have learned so much from you. You NEVER cease to amaze me, Hil. I had no idea the bones were that good for us. I cook with them a lot and just never realized about the health benefits. I especially enjoyed reading about the digestion part. Thanks, my friend. xoxoxoxo

Botanist said...

We cooked a ham on the bone for New Year, and reckoned the wonderful flavour had something to do with the bone. And the remnants of the Christmas turkey always produces several batches of stock to freeze for soups for the next few months.

Pearson Report said...

What a great, and enlightening, post. I enjoyed it - and went right over to check out the Paleo site. Thanks Hilary.
I'm a fan of homemade chicken soup and love using the whole bird. Your posts are always so insightful and motivating.

Cheers, Jenny xxoo

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nat – I hope that soup was extra delicious and you feel better with it … bolstering your energies …

@ Donna – well I hope you went off and made that chicken soup.. it is so good for us and you can throw off your thick head cold …

@ OOTP – I can believe that .. and how fantastic to have a butcher who saved the bones for you .. that’s how it used to be years ago. How great you’ve got a chicken ready for chicken noodles today – comfort food = most definitely ..

@ Susan – Americans do seem to use more ham … I wonder why. Chicken is such a good meal … hope you have another go ..

@ Jo – yes Marrow = I know. I had marrow on toast in my early adulthood – that’s when it popped up in my life. I know we can’t perhaps do all the things we might have done now we’re in smaller kitchens and not in those rustic kitchens. I didn’t go into all the meals .. I’d be here for ever!! But we cook similarly I guess … so pleased your chicken noodles were deeelicious.

@ Clarissa – good to see – Happy New Year … and so glad you agree re bones.

@ Carole – yes you, Jo and I would have similar memories … I’m sure there was a routine in the house ... and certainly we used ‘blue’ to add to the white wash. It was a disgrace to do anything other than Church and ‘rest’ on Sunday … they were good days.

@ Jen – you’re lucky to have that lovely lady making soup for you when you need it. The Korean recipe sounds delicious ... a little bit of extra perk up. It’s good to know food does perk us up.

@ Christine – yes for sick kids .. we were always fed broth of some description … and now I use chicken soup on me! It is good for sensitive tummies … not too rich, but full of goodness.

@ Betsy – yes I was thinking of ‘give the dog a bone’ … but never worked the phrase in …

@ LG – I’m cracked – I was trying to think of a verse to use .. but it didn’t come to mind – thank you so much for setting it out here … excellent to read.

@ Munir – glad your hubby appreciates my post! That’s fine it’s good to eat lots of veg too … but your hubby is lucky you cook meat for him. No worries – you can leave the bones for us!!

@ Susan – canned salmon, sardines etc are all good … but as you mention the roasted joint is extra good … chicken and turkey make excellent stocks – especially at Christmas time. Bean soup .. I love that too – especially home-made … and with a big ol’ meaty hambone.

@ Robyn – oh yes … eat up ‘dem bones!! But I see you do use bones in your cooking, which is the main thing … we’re always being ‘taught’ many new things ... though the oldies used to cook and eat this way. Looks like we have lots of people with digestion problems …

@ Ian – ham on the bone is so good isn’t it – I don’t get it often … but love the flavour. Glad you cook up the bones to make stock for later soups etc … it does make a delicious stock … so tasty.

@ Jenny – glad you looked up the Paleo site … and that you’re a fan of homemade chicken soup … it is good isn’t it … I’m thinking of my here’s to a healthy Hilary of 2 years ago and the chicken pot I made … Thanks so much for your comment …

Thank you … we’re in the middle of a stormy weekend Scotland is badly hit … I just hope it doesn’t do too much damage down here … perhaps I should go out and buy a chicken and some soup ingredients in case! Cheers to you all .. and here’s to health - Hilary

Judy Croome | @judy_croome said...

Hilary, I'm a vegetarian!! How can I comment on your post!! :) Well, my 80 year old Mom broke a bone just before Xmas - a rib! Nothing the doctors can do but thankfully she's slowly getting better. What else? Hmm. Nothing scarier than when you're in the bush and you hear the sound of hyenas crunching the bones. Which reminds me of my Shadow, when she's in hunting mode - the midnight crunching and slurping noises would give me nightmares if she didn't purr with pride after her job was done!! Hope 2015 is a wonderful year for you - lots of laughter, peace and happiness!
Judy Croome, South Africa : The Waves of Change

Gattina said...

That all looks so delicious ! I don't mind bones at all, but Mr. G. is very picky, he hates bones, meat or fish !

Karen Walker said...

I thrive on homemade chicken soup. I've heard it called Jewish penicillin. This is such a useful, needed post, Hilary

Arlee Bird said...

You're making me rethink the subject of bones. I always throw away any bones we end up with which is not many. Most of the chicken I buy is of the boneless breast variety. After Christmas we just tossed the leftover turkey bones.

Maybe I need to become more versed with cooking with bones.

Lee
Tossing It Out

Karen Jones Gowen said...

I always make soup out of bones-- beef bones, chicken bones and my favorite, the turkey carcass! And I'll admit to chewing the ends off chicken bones to get the marrow. I've done it all my life and never thought anything of it. I guess it could be seen as disgusting hehe.

TexWisGirl said...

we always used bones for soup stock. but having had a fish bone stuck in my tonsils for days as a child, i'm not a fan of fish bones. :)

Sherry Ellis said...

As long as you don't choke on them, bones can be good!

Michelle Wallace said...

Now I've got that song ringing in my head... dem bones, dem bones, dem dry bones...
That T-bone steak looks very juicy... and the roasted leg of lamb...

Margie said...

I made some wonderful soup from the turkey bones from our Christmas turkey!
Great post, thanks Hilary

Brian Miller said...

i would def eat bone broth and bone marrow....
i would wonder at fish bones though...wouldnt you run the risk of one getting hung up and jabbing into you?

Julie Flanders said...

I never thought a post about bones could make me hungry but this one did. I'm dying for that t-bone steak now. :D

DMS said...

What a fascinating post! I know that bones are used in chicken stock for soup, but I had no idea why. It makes sense that we get a lot of nutrients from the bones and that is why we have chicken soup when we are sick and it helps to heal us. I learned something new today. Thanks!
~Jess

Val Poore said...

It really does make a lot of sense, Hilary. The trouble is that as a vegetarian, I cannot subscribe. You do make a good case for it though.

Nicola said...

Great tantalising post! Bang goes my diet. The hunger pains have just exploded into action :)

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

We don't cook with beef, but the turkey carcass always going in a pot to make turkey soup.

Danielle L Zecher said...

I love making stock from chicken bones! It's so good, and makes me feel really thrifty. Hubby is very weird about bones in his food, though, so I end up buying a lot of boneless, skinless.

Very informative post.

Denise Covey said...

I agree, Hilary, bones are so good for you. The dogs know. They always suck the marrow dry. But with so many vegetarians about,what are they going to do?

I haven't got back into blogging yet. Still up at the coast enjoying sun, pool, coffee shops (no bones). But I'm doing a crazy lot of writing!

Happy New Year!

Denise :-)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Judy – good to see you .. and a vegetarian – I eat a lot of meatless meals … but don’t fall into the vegetarian category. So sorry about the post – but thank you for the comment anyway. I’m glad your mother is improving .. ribs are very sore things to hurt.

Yes I can remember scrunching bones ... hyenas are incredibly strong jawed. Pussy cats do love a good chase and a good munch too … and yes then the purr for a good job done. Reminders of days past …

@ Gattina – funny how some people are happy with bones, others not so …

@ Karen – I haven’t heard that particular term - Jewish penicillin makes good sense … I’m just glad I’ve written the post now!!

@ Lee – well that’s good Lee, if I’m getting you to rethink … perhaps you’ll make soup next year from the turkey bones. Even just eating meat on the bone will give you some of the extra goodness.

@ Karen – with your large family, when they were growing up, I bet you used everything possible … and you’re a very good cook, as your cookery book showed us. We’ve always gnawed at the bones … seemed the logical thing to do … so no, I don’t think of it as disgusting at all …

@ TWG – fish bones can cause a problem and I can quite see why you’re not a fan of fish bones, after that experience … frightening for a kid. I’d imagine you’d make soup stock on your ranch …

@ Sherry – yes as long as we don’t choke on them .. the little ones can be a challenge sometimes.

@ Michelle – yes I didn’t put that song in this post … it’s such a catchy song. South African T-bone and a Karoo roast lamb – both delicious

@ Margie – Turkey soup is good isn’t it …and I expect it provided some extra goodness for your hubby as he continues to recuperate.

@ Brian – granted meat bones are easier to deal with than fish bones … but it’s the goodness that is absorbed into the pie, sauce, casserole that’s so good – then the bones can be discarded. Hung up and dried like a kipper … I’d hope not!!

@ Julie – I’m glad I succeeded in one of my aims of the post – to make it enticing and encourage everyone to use more bones when cooking …

@ Jess – you got it in one … all those nutrients lingering just waiting to be absorbed by us … and I love chicken soup it just ‘picks me up’ …

@ Val – I know posts like this don’t do much for the vegetarians do they … I think you’re missing out on the chicken soup though … but I don’t eat much meat, I eat more fish.

@ Nicola – sorry about that .. but a good roast, or a pot of chicken soup shouldn’t knock your diet too much … and yes when I think of food I get hungry too …

@ Alex – that’s good to know you use the carcass for turkey soup.

@ Danielle – yes you’re right about the thriftiness; sad about your hubby being weird re bones in his food – you could always cook with the bones and extract them before serving … but I’m glad you appreciated the post.

@ Denise – good to see you .. and so glad you’re enjoying your writing break – it must be lovely .. hot but a good change. Dogs love their bones don’t they … you can sort of envisage all the nutrients coming out as they gnaw their bones.

I can understand people becoming vegetarians … but we’ve evolved from hunter gatherers to the way we are now … and we need the nutrients – which vegetarians will get some from beans and pulses etc, but many are chemically produced … it’s an interesting thought …

Cheers everyone – this could turn into an interesting debate on a variety of subjects … but I think I’ll leave it for now with chicken soup for the soul! Hilary

Inger said...

When I was a kid, I used to love to suck the marrow from the inside of bones. I don't eat much meat any more, just what my hubby cooks and now it's mostly chicken and fish. I think it is good though that I got a lot of nourishment growing up from parts of animals that people no longer see fit to eat, and I couldn't any more (pigs feet, ox tongue, hearts, livers, and oh, those kidney pies in England).

Annalisa Crawford said...

Bones are fine on my plate... eyes are not! I was 'encouraged' to make star gazey pie at primary school - we were in a group and all took home a portion. Only my portion contained the fish head - my mum was even less impressed than me!!

Milo James Fowler said...

Dem bones, dem bones, dem dry bones -- yummy!

Rosalind Adam said...

Karen is quite right. We do call it Jewish penicillin. My Great Auntie Lena would make it weekly and many of my friends still make it for the start of the Friday evening meal. After reading your post Hilary, I now understand a bit more about why it works because work it certainly does.

Lynn said...

I think there is definitely a place for bones in our diet. I have friends who can't stomach it, but I do eat meat. I like to eat vegetarian, too, so I mix it up.

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

Due to ongoing problems with my incredibly slow computer, soon to be scrapped, I must keep this comment short before the bloody thing crashes again.

You always have a way of explaining things and this was most informative about bones. In fact, the expression, "I have a bone to pick with you". is now a most pleasant meaning.

Cheer, Hilary.

Gary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Inger – I don’t remember sucking the marrow out .. maybe because we reared chickens and pigs … so perhaps didn’t have lamb or beef that often. But I developed a love for home-cooked food and so started to experience those things.

You’re lucky with your hubby – and it’s great he loves to cook … and I’d be happy with chicken and fish … in fact I rarely eat the other meats now – just occasionally. But growing up – again we had all those offal meats and I loved them … strangely I fancied some kidneys in suet and bought some … which I’ll use at some stage – life has fast forwarded slightly … more tomorrow.

@ Annalisa – I loved your story about Star Gazey Pie and thanks for going over and commenting on my SGP post just before Christmas.

Seems a little unfair that one group got fish pie, while the others got cakes or breads … I’d be very happy to be in the fish pie group now – but back then … thank you give me the cake or bread group!! I’m sure your mother was less than impressed when you took your portion home .. hope it tasted good – perhaps you didn’t try it?!

@ Milo – Dem Bones, dem bones … they be very good for thee!

@ Ros – is it Jewish Penicillin .. I hadn’t heard the term – but good to know it’s commonplace (as such). Those were the days weren’t they … family meals .. and you now continue on that tradition. I certainly took on board more about how the bones are so helpful to us and our health. That chicken casserole I made … chicken soup with lots of chicken and lots of veg – did wonders for me two years ago.

@ Lynn – I agree .. I’m like you – I eat all things and am always ringing the changes … and I love veggie food and not too much meat.

@ Gary – sorry about your m/c and I hope it gets sorted out for you soon. Frustrating to say the least.

I have a bone to pick with you – of course I didn’t put that phrase in did I … thanks for adding this to the mix. Your interpretation is definitely much better than the real thing!

Cheers to you all … we’re awaiting more stormy (wet, wind, some cold and some snow) weather … here in this little island – down here we’re ‘warm’ – I’m pleased to say! Hilary

T. Powell Coltrin said...

I'm a country girl. Growing up, we never threw anything away. When we used the bones for cooking with beans, etc. we tossed it to the dog. I wouldn't toss one to Millie, though. :) Bones cooked with their meat definitely adds more flavor. I didn't know they had good benefits, though. I love gnawing chicken off it's bone. That seems gross, but the cavewoman in me says, "It's good." (Imagine that said in cave talk.)

Love this post. So informative.

Chrys Fey said...

I remember when I was eating fish as a child and a fish bone got stuck in my throat. Off to the ER to have it removed! I didn't eat fish for years after that because I was too scared.

I don't eat anything with bones in it now...I'm a vegetarian. HAHA! :p

cleemckenzie said...

I'm with you on this, Hilary! I roast my bones into gelatin, freeze that rich, dark substance and plunk the cubes into stews and soups. Love dem bones. Love your post about them, too!

Bish Denham said...

Yup, bones are good. My mother used to suck out the marrow from chicken bones. And growing up in the tropics I'm not the least disturbed by fish bones, even though I had one stuck in my throat once.

beste barki said...

They say something in chicken soup is anti-inflammatory. I also know that bones are good for you. However, fish bones is another story Hilary. I am so afraid I am going to have one stuck in my throat that I can't bring myself to enjoy fish with bones.

Amanda Trought said...

And there was I going to make some chicken soup after cooking a whole chicken at the weekend, but someone who shall remain nameless didn't pass on the message to his dad not to throw away the bones that was left. Hilary really enjoyed this post, it brought back memories as a child, my sister used to munch on the bones when we were kids, me and my brother thought it was hilarious.lol

Southpaw HR Sinclair said...

I don't mind bones at all - unless it is fish, those fine bones are icky!

Mary Montague Sikes said...

Our daughter, Amy, is big into paleo and makes a bone broth to use in soups. Thanks for sharing all of this. Also, thanks for visiting and commenting on my blog!

Trisha F said...

I hate cooking, so doubt I will ever be making use of bones this way - but I definitely see the health benefits, and really wish I did enjoy cooking. ;)

N. R. Williams said...

Hi Hilary
Great post. I made chicken soup from scratch today. I've never done it before. However, I used store bought chicken broth because I'm poor. Can't afford a giant chicken, well...not so giant anymore. They used to be a lot bigger. Last week however, I made the best potato soup, yum, yum. I'm new to soup making and really enjoy it.

Sarah E. Albom said...

I like the big bones (not to eat, rather as a handle), but the little ones get on my nerves. We don't really make a lot of chicken soups or anything because Melissa is vegetarian and she'd have to make something special, but I'll suggest it as a one off for the rest of the family.

Tammy Theriault said...

I totally get it now!!! Haha!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Teresa – sounds like your family was like ours – and yes Millie doesn’t need bones though – they could splinter. Good old roasts really taste so good don’t they. I think in ‘cave talk’ – we’d be smiling, laughing, waving our arms about and gesticulating in delight?!! Happy times …

@ Chrys – oh sorry about the bone story – I can understand the fear. Another vegetarian … that’s good too ..

@ Lee – sounds like you are very good ‘haus frau’ … and your stocks and stews must be so so good. Glad you enjoyed the post.

@ Bish – we had chickens .. but I don’t remember breaking the bones to eat the marrow in them. You’d be lost without eating fish wouldn’t you .. so much delicious fish must abound in the Caribbean.

@ Beste – it’s the goodness that leaches out of the bones – so don’t eat fish bones usually (tinned fish can be ok) … but use them in your dishes – just extract them later, or as you eat them.

@ Amanda – ah ha … oh dear – I guess that won’t happen again and the bones will be saved?! I’m glad your sister enjoyed her bones so much .. and yes kids will laugh won’t they …

@ Holly – I agree the fine fish bones are a nuisance … but good to have cooked with them.

@ Monti – that’s good to know about Amy and her interest in the Paleo way of eating. Good to see you across at your blog and to see your art works and books.

@ Trisha – I guess if you don’t enjoy cooking – then you won’t be that interested … and I know other people who are in similar situations – who would like to want to cook … but you have many other talents.

@ Nancy – yes I’m sorry about your situation .. but you are doing the best for yourself and are ringing the changes – the best way to maintain your health. Good luck with those soups.

@ Sarah – yes do you use them with your drama work – once they’re cleaned etc? I can understand that … I know other children who’ve opted for vegetarian food – but I’m sure your parents and you would enjoy the ‘simple’ chicken soup for the soul!!

@ Tammy – ok that’s good – thanks for coming over now.

Cheers to you all .. must dash – lots happening today .. I need all the bone broth I can get now!! Hilary

Sue McPeak said...

Wow, Hilary, so much to take in here, today! First and foremost, all the best with your Hip Op. I think your positive attitude will serve you well...so with that said....see you for AtoZ in April. Take great care of YOU.
Sue at CollectInTexas Gal

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Sue .. good to see you. Thanks - I'm sure the hip op will be fine. Just get on moving meeee butttt!! Just been to the hospital and they all seem to think I'll be fine. I'm sure I'll do an odd post or two before then ... but I will be back ... and thank you - taking care of me now is the important bit! Cheers Hilary

Empty Nest Insider said...

My mom and grandma always made the best chicken soup. I've never been brave enough to make it myself, but have found a few local places that taste pretty close to homemade. Every dish sounds absolutely mouth-watering after you've described it, Hilary!

Julie

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Julie - give it a try if you can - when I was ill ... All I did was put all the ingredients in a pot, add water, stock cube, bring to boil, then simmer for an hour or so ... It was just what I needed - restored the ill body!! Could have extra ingredients added ... But was delicious, as was, to the invalid. Glad you've found some good places locally - cheers Hilary