Friday, 27 March 2015

Supermoon, Solar Eclipse et al, Richard III and That Was the Week That Was Post …



So much has happened in the past ten days or so … I’ll touch on a few of the celestial happenings in recent days and 529 years ago …

Images of the Aurora Australis and Aurora Borealis
from around the world, including those
with rarer red and blue lights


So guess what – a shortish post (no – failed!) – but one with some links and notes to self and blogging friends … that’s there’s plenty more information where this lot came from …


Let’s start simply:



Spectacular Auroras – the sun’s magnetic field was having a frothy … to the delight of astronomers and peoples all around the world … our Northern Lights reached down to the Midlands … much further south than usual.


Black Supermoon – yes black because it occurred in daylight so we couldn’t see it … til the partial solar eclipse happened – then we knew we hadn’t lost it!  The Moon will disappear in about 600,000 years …


Jupiter Aurora: the bright spot star at far
top left connects magnetically to Io;
spots at bottom lead
to Gannymede and Europa
Clearly visible in the night sky was Jupiter with its four largest moons (Europa, Io, Gannymede, Calisto) on one side: a rare occurrence that happens once every six years.






Spring Equinox – when our days in the northern hemisphere get longer – lovely longer days and our clocks go back on Saturday/Sunday night ... long evenings will be here!


Spring Tides – the sun and moon affect the tidal range … and when there is a rare alignment between them (every 18 years) … these become very high tides.


  • The Severn Bore – which is a wave push of ocean water up the funnel shaped Severn Estuary into the Severn River … the height reached six foot two inches (just under 2 metres) …


Mont St Michel at very low tide

  • … while at Mont St Michel on the north coast of France, the Benedictine Abbey built on a rocky outcrop about half a mile from shore, was breached by the tidal reach of over 46 feet (14.15m) …




These Supertides, somewhat incorrectly named as “Tides of the Century”, occur every 18 years – our next one will be 3 March 2033.


Partial eclipse c/o Sun Manchester
Evening News




Solar Eclipse – for us down on the south coast this was a partial eclipse: 85% - a brief darkening … but further north the eclipse covered more.





  • An email from a blogging friend in South Africa saying it was amazing she was on Sky tv watching the eclipse at Newquay in Cornwall!  My reply: I was sitting in cloud in Eastbourne!



  • For the 1999 eclipse I was with friends in Newport Pagnell, having a social, and though we weren’t in the best part of the UK … the effects were amazing.  Cold, damp, gloomy, silence as the birds disappeared … eerie … but wonderful to have seen.

 
The moon tinted reddish,
during a lunar eclipse

  • Next eclipse here in the UK will be a partial one on 26 August 2016, or we’ll have to wait for a total one in 2090!?!


  • Next total eclipse in the States will be in a corridor stretching from Oregon to South Carolina on 21 August 2017 – school holidays and obviously will be a partial eclipse elsewhere.



Stargazing Live  (BBC2) with Brian Cox and Dara O’Briain– the tv programme monitoring the Eclipse and all celestial wonders … told us plenty (plenty!) of unusual and interesting things about life up there and down here …


Telerobotics, Haptics and Human Robot Interfaces to be used in Space Exploration … robots we know … (ESA Telerobotics site



Exo Skeleton from ESA Telrobotics site

  • but haptics interested me … the technology of touch – our tactile sense of for example the hand, fully relying on what we’re feeling, not seeing; (the example used was tying our shoe laces under a table – we could do that without looking).


  • In space our use of touch is different – so haptics will be adapted in the design of mechanisms to be used in space.



Moon ‘debris’ … I hadn’t realised a mirror was left during the first Apollo landing, allowing scientists to bounce laser images off it – telling us that the moon is moving away from earth at a rate of two and half inches (3.7 cm) a year …

  • … its gravitational pull will have gone in 600,000 years … while if the sun hasn’t subsumed it, it will take about 5 – 6 million years to fade away into infinity.

Picture of the Sun in extreme ultraviolet
showing its turbulent surface



Lots of facts about the sun to be had … we can’t see most of it – as we can only see visible light (not the electromagnetic spectrum: eg infrared, nor ultraviolet) … technology allows us to see that the sun is much bigger than the disc we see in the sky.




  • Usually as we move away from a heat source it gets cooler … not so the sun … the temperature in the sun’s atmosphere is 100 times hotter than at its surface.



The zodiac has changed – the stars the ancients used are different to the ones we see today … not sure what we do about our horoscopes!  There's a new star sign: Ophiuchus ... see table in Wiki 



Future Earth - BBC TImeline - the sun has created
merry fiery hell here and we've long gone


We owe everything to that central star of our Solar System – the sun – for our light, warmth, energy and life … and it will be around for another few billion years … 




... before it becomes a red giant and expands out into the solar system swallowing earth in its dying process



The scientists are finding out so much and expanding our minds to new dimensions …


The Pall cloth, and crown for Richard III's
burial - half a millennium after his death.
… yet this past week or so scientists, passionate historians, archaeologists, the public from places as far afield as Australia, the Americas, South India, Kyrgyzstan, Europe and plenty of Brits, clerics, scientists, celebrities, royalty and nobility have all gathered in the city of Leicester to participate in and record the extraordinary and unique re-interment of Richard III (1452 – 1485) …


… Richard who was born a Catholic and died before the Reformation took place brought together the professionals to choose appropriate Services for his journey from the University via the battle field at Bosworth, where he died, into the hands of the Church at Leicester Cathedral next to the Friary where he was buried in haste 529 years ago.


Mounted armoured knights accompanied
Richard III from the University to the Cathedral
Henry VIII (1491 – 1547) ordered the destruction of the Friary under state-enforced Dissolution of the Monasteries … so Richard’s grave was presumed lost forever … miracles do occur … and in one of those believe it or not stories … they did find his remains under the municipal car park on just about the first dig: extraordinary.


A Solar Eclipse happened the day Queen Anne Neville died, Richard III’s wife, while there was a lunar eclipse after the warrior king’s death at Bosworth … coincidence we had a solar eclipse in 2015 the Friday before the start of Richard’s skeletal removal from the University to his final resting place in Leicester Cathedral.


Grey Friars accompanied Richard's hearse
at the Battle of Bosworth Field


Celestial happenings for the Plantagenet King’s Church of England reburial – both then and now – in a city that is the multi-cultural centre of England


Well that was the week and a bit that was … lots more information in my notes and I’ll put some links up …


Richard III - they believe he was
more likely to be blond
While the last medieval king finally gains honour in death five centuries on … in a totally British 21st century way – a unique occasion …


An incredible week in our history, which has captured the nation's imagination ... 



Ros Adams has written a children's book on Richard III and she has a series of posts up about her experience, as she was involved in many things in Leicester ... 


There's a detailed and comprehensive report of King Richard's Reinterment Service and extra information ... the poem, the Queen's message, the Eulogy, the Sermon ... and details of the Service etc - as well as lots of photos ... 

My main interest was the detail about the Catholic reburial service being 'common' in the late 14th C to early 16th C ... before Henry VIII's Reformation and the phasing in of The Church of England through Elizabeth I's reign ... 



Addendum:  I've been asked about Blood Moons .. the information is all contained here .. and yes there is a Blood Moon soon ... 


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

60 comments:

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

Now this is a jam-packed post! Love all these facts and news bits. I've been to Mont St Michel (it was over 20 years ago) and remember thinking it magical. I don't think I'd have wanted to be there during the supertide, though.

And I've been following the Richard III story with interest. Sounds as if he's really had a fitting burial this time.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Wow, it's been busy out there in the stars! Bummer we'll lose the moon. At least not in our lifetime. That will really mess up the tides, won't it?

Morgan said...

Oh my YES. Love this post!!! This information particularly fascinates me. Hope you're doing well, beautiful Hilary. :)

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Hilary, this post is... far out! Really, I loved all the celestial tidbits. Did you get to see the aurora where you are? There were even some conjectures that it might be seen as far south as we are, but it didn't even come close, darn it. Seeing the aurora borealis in person is one of those things I really hope to experience some day.

Sue McPeak said...

As always, Hilary, a post packed with interesting, educational and entertaining information. Enjoyed the Sun, Moon and Stars info, but I have to say Richard III stole the show. Perhaps due to the fact that the battle at Bosworth figured into my own Family Research. I did not know, however, the recent history and his re-internment until it was on the news...and from your blog. Incredible, the Solar Eclipse on the day Queen Anne Neville died and a lunar one after Richards death and then the solar eclipse during the re-internment. I have said many times....I believe in Kismet!!! Thanks for a wonderful post.
Sue at CollectInTexas Gal
AtoZ 2015 Challenge
Minion for AJ's wHooligans

Jo said...

Phew. I've never seen an eclipse, always been too cloudy or something. I found the story of Richard III and his discover and now reburial to be fascinating. Saw a programme on TV about it. One always tends to think of him as Shakespeare portrayed him but one gathers that is far from the truth.

What a lot of celestial happenings in one week. I don't think I will be around to see the next events on the dates you mention. Bit too far into the future.

Jo said...

Forgot about the tides part, neaps and springs, I have seen a few of those in my time. Didn't know the springs could affect the abbey on St. Michel though.

Fil said...

It has been such an exciting week - I love all your information Hilary - the haptic sounds fascinating. Dara and Brian Cox did a great job and we were really fortunate to see the eclipse 2 or 3 times during the couple of hours of its passing. The birds going silent was so strange. A wonderful experience.
And Richard - it was very moving watching the ceremony and all the information about him.
Great times, especially in a week when there has been so much bad news as well.
Enjoy getting ready for the A to Z - i'm looking forward to touring Cornwall with you,
Best wishes
Fil

Janie Junebug said...

I have a documentary about Richard III's bones in my Netflix queue. I know it will be good. Thank you, as always, for the excellent information.

Love,
Janie

Rhonda Albom said...

Well, I certainly picked the wrong week to get some sleep. What a busy sky. How can we loose the moon?

Geo. said...

Reading your post gave me that peculiar sensation of the universe's tremendous operations, cosmic motion from which our sense of time is drawn. I did know about the mirror on the moon --a cousin who was studying lasers in 1968 told me a mirror would accompany Apollo. I sure hope current and coming generations have such exciting celestial prospects in their lives, wonders to dream of.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Elizabeth – yes there was rather a lot and much more left on the editing desk! I’ve never been to Mont St Michel – I see a lot of St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall though … the authorities were keeping people in check re the tide – they were paddling. I was very emotional through the Richard III’s two live programmes – really interesting to be able to put some pieces into the puzzle of the War of the Roses etc … Seemingly he had a quick appropriate burial in 1485 – but it had to be because Henry VII (Henry Tudor) wouldn’t have wanted him to be around in any shape or form.

@ Alex – yes it’s been a very busy time and thankfully the moon will stick around for us! Yes – but the planet evolves ... as do the stars in the sky .. that part was really informative too …sadly too much to put into this post.

@ Morgan – there was so so much information … such fun to find out about and you’re all enjoying it so much – that thrills me … I’m fine thanks Morgan – delighted to see you …

@ Susan – so much to write about ... I could have gone on ‘for hours’; sadly the Aurora didn’t reach as far south as us and like you I’ve never seen them, but would love to.

@ Sue – thanks so much … it’s really been a busy celestial ten days. I agree Richard’s procession and subsequent reburial was quite extraordinary to watch … the interweaving of Medieval and 21st century Services – they found a record for a medieval service for the reburial of the human remains of a noble person: that sort of service was surprisingly widespread in the 15th century. More information here: http://kingrichardinleicester.com/the-reinterment-of-king-richard-iii-live/

How fascinating to find your family research takes you to the Battle at Bosworth … they traced quite a lot of English people to the battle … as at that stage in history, the population seemed to marry into local families and didn’t move much. Seems like fate doesn’t it … and am so glad you enjoyed this post.

@ Jo – I’ve only caught a brief eclipse – but in Newport Pagnell it definitely went dark and was gloomy. So much going on recently … the tides affect the west coasts around the UK and France – I’m not sure if the Spanish and Portuguese coasts are too …

There was quite a lot of discussion about Shakespeare’s Richard III – but he was writing in the Tudor times and one hundred years after the event, the end of the Plantagenet kings … and life was harsh then – whoever was in control needed to make sure their rivals weren’t around …

@ Fil – how very lucky you were ... I saw the skies cleared in Northern Ireland … so you could see the eclipse and experience the darkening of the skies and its effect. The Stargazing tv team did give us a great expose on what’s going on in our skies.

The two processions and Services for Richard were extraordinary weren’t they … I was very moved. I couldn’t do the bad news … and now I must get to the A-Z!!!

@ Janie – that’s great… you’ll enjoy the documentary about Richard – fascinating story.

@ Rhonda – there was such a lot going on – hope you saw the Aurora in Auckland … I was particularly interested in the movement of the stars … and yes the Moon will fade away!

@ Geo – I was struggling with how many posts to write, how much to put in etc …. In the end I went this eclectic route … touching many of the bases.

The movement of the constellations and stars really fascinated as to what’s happening with the continents on earth … everything is moving around all the time.

I’m sure our younger current and coming generations will presumably have greater insights and views of the skies, as technology is constantly (and rapidly) improving …

Cheers to you all – so thrilled this has ticked many boxes with you … have a happy weekend – now on to the A-Z! Hilary

suesconsideredtrifles said...

Hilary, I hope you are going to put your clocks forward. Perhaps they are automatic. (Spring forward, fall back.)
I'll come back and read this properly later. Sue

Gattina said...

I haven't seen anything, the sky was completely covered with clouds, what a disappointment for all those who had bought special glasses to see the eclipse. Summer time also starts here this weekend, but there is still one hour difference with the UK
I have seen part of King Richard's Reinterment Service, what an event to have found and identified his bones so many years later !

Out on the prairie said...

It remained cloudy here to see the aurora. One year flying to Europe we could see it in full glory. Glad I had a window seat.We set up scopes out on the farm and turn off all lights. It is fun to se some of this up close.

Murees Dupé said...

I can always rely on you to teach me something new. Thank you. Have a great weekend.

Patsy said...

It was too cloudy to see the eclipse here, but we went out and stood in the cold pretending we could! I did see the 99 one though and maybe I'll be lucky with next year's partial?

The Aurora Borealis is amazing - I saw it once or maybe it was an electrical storm? The whole sky glowed green (I wasn't alone so didn't imagine it!) I hope to see another one one of our trips.

TexWisGirl said...

you still probably saw a lot more of the eclipse than we had a chance to in the US. :)

L.G. Smith said...

Um, holy cow, Hilary! That was a packed post, but so many interesting natural phenomena to comment on. LOVE those auroras. I'm always so fascinated by those. They say we get them here in Colorado, but I've never witnessed it. Too much light pollution where I live.

Juliet Batten said...

Hilary, what a breathtaking post. I love all the celestial information - the photos are really striking. Thank you.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sue - clocks done: I think I'm in the right time frame! Some are automatic ... some needed some finger help!

@ Gattina - I know I think we had a cloudy deal ... still an hour different - well at least we do it the same weekend. Glad you saw some of Richard's Services .. and isn't it amazing that they identified his bones are all these years: that window of opportunity, when it could be done technically, relatives were still alive, and the bones were actually found - and could thus be tested.

@ OOTP - I'm sure the Aurora when they occur must be amazing out on the form - the thought of having scopes set up to look through ... and then your flight - what a stroke of luck to see it in full glory.

@ Murees - thank you

@ Patsy - yes like you too cloudy - let's hope re next year's partial .. it's in August - as was the 1999 total eclipse one.

How amazing about the Aurora ... must have come this far south then .. extraordinary and how very fortunate ... and I'm sure you'll catch another on your trips.

@ Theresa - well we had a brief cold darkening for a short while, but we're on the fringes on the south coast. You'll get your chance in 2017 ...

@ Luanne - yes it was packed .. but what can I do - ignore it all, or at least get some of it up. I love the auroras too - I had a poster made up for my mother .. but she wasn't enamoured, so I put it behind her bed - where I could see it! One day I hope you get a chance to see some of these celestial happenings ..

@ Juliet - thanks so much .. and I was fascinated by what I learnt, or came across as I did various searches - and I'm glad Wiki could provide me with pictures that matched - it helps doesn't it ...

Cheers to you all .. Hilary

Ida Chiavaro said...

wow Hilary you were right it certainly was a failed short post, but oh so fascinating to see all the interesting happenings of the last month or 593 years in one post. I have friends in Iceland that posted aurora photos, I was just pleased to know people close to the wonder of it all, and the new star signs make a lot of sense to me. I hope you have a wonderful #atozchallenge. I will be participating but not likely to be able to get around to many blogs, or even respond to comments till after mid April when I have returned home. I'll be keeping an eye on you and your interesting posts though. All the best

bazza said...

Yes, I do hope you put your clocks forward! A lovely fun-filled and informative post as always!
(Listening to The Everly Brothers - 'Like Strangers'.)
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s fabulous Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Karen Walker said...

Ah, Hilary,always something interesting. 600,000 more years to have our moon, Glad I won't be around to see it disappear, I love the moon.

Milo James Fowler said...

Isn't there a "Blood Moon" on the way? What's up with that?

janice h said...

Gosh I wish you'd been my primary teacher or taught something called Eclectic Education at my school! There's something magical about your juxtapositions; even if there's a lot of information, something always sticks. My brain is free here to browse, focus, skim read, link hop or get absorbed, even when the subject is something I'd turn off if it was on the telly or flick past in a magazine(Richard's skeleton - case in point. No interest whatsoever)Your youness links events together in such a life-loving way, it's irresistible! Hope the hip's healing nicely.

Vallypee said...

As always, a fascinating post, Hilary. I didn't know the moon was moving away from us. I hope Richard is at peace now he has been buried properly with suitable pomp.

Suzanne Furness said...

A lot happening of late amongst the stars. Eclipse not as impressive this time as the last full one in 1999. Watched that one creep across from Penzance. Awesome sight.

loverofwords said...

How do you do this? So many tantalizing bits of information. But I do love the Richard III story, after all these years, but a fitting burial and another look at his real story.

Rosalind Adam said...

Thank you for the mention, Hilary. I saw the eclipse. It was thankfully clear in Leicester. I saw Richard III's coffin too. I feel very privileged to have witnessed so much at such close proximity. It's been an amazing week here in Leicester.

Annalisa Crawford said...

It was a very busy week, wasn't it? I was working during the eclipse, but saw it go dark and a bit eerie. (1999 was soo much better :-) )

I knew about the mirror on the moon because they shone a laser up to it on The Big Bang Theory. A lot of my current geek/science knowledge comes from a comedy show!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Ida – I had to put as much information into the post as I could, though I had a lot more that I could have added to it – how lovely to see your friend’s aurora photos. The new star sign – I knew nothing about .. but now I’ve learnt a little.

Good luck with the A-Z challenge .. and I know you’ve got a lot on and are moving back to Europe .. we’ll see you when we see you …

@ Bazza – I did put my clocks forward! Glad you enjoyed the post ..

@ Karen – lots of goodies here .. and yes, thank goodness we’ll have long gone before the moon disappears ..

@ Milo – yes there is .. here’s the info: http://earthsky.org/space/what-is-a-blood-moon-lunar-eclipses-2014-2015 I’ll add it in to the post …

@ Janice – thanks so much … back then I had no knowledge of much or certainly history or any other discipline … but I just love putting interesting snippets together that have a tie in of sorts … Richard III was a little exception! But I had to put something in about him – and that did interest me …

Really appreciate your comment and thoughts here … delighted its irresistible .. and yes, thank you slowly healing up …

@ Val – lots happened and yes I didn’t know the moon was just wandering off into space! I hope Richard’s enjoyed his last journey … it was a good procession and Re-interment …

@ Suzanne – I agree the 1999 total eclipse was better – but we experienced a little here … it’s been a fun time …

@ Nat – things just interest me and I like writing about them and putting snippets together. The Richard III was a wonderful finish to his journey of life …

@ Ros – you’ve done us proud with your posts and then your book is a wonder. I imagine all the Richard experiences must have made such a mark … I’m looking forward to getting up sometime and seeing his new resting place for real. As well as see the exhibition … Leicester must be a changed city.

@ Annalisa – I noticed the darkness briefly here – but 1999 was so much better – but we’ve seen something and that’s more than many. I didn’t know about the mirror on the moon – I’m no science geek! Nor did I see The Big Bang Theory Comedy Show .. perhaps it was during the 1980s when I was away …

Cheers and thanks so much for some wonderful comments - Hilary

Nas said...

An interesting post. I'm fascinated by what all happens our in our galaxies. Thanks for sharing Hilary!

Sarah E. Albom said...

Poor moon :( I've heard about it moving away from us, but I didn't realise it would be gone in a mere 600,000 years. Hmm, actually that's quite long depending on how you think about it.
New Zealand's going to have a lunar eclipse or something like that in a few days. I only know that though because A. It's on my birthday and B. A bunch of friends and I are going to go watch it in the park.

Gingi Freeman said...

I've only seen a few auroras in my life! Its on my hubbys bucket list to see one someday! Great post friend! <3 - www.domesticgeekgirl.com

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nas - it is incredible that we can see so much happening in our galaxies ... and I was fascinated ..

@ Sarah - my guess is the 4th April Easter Monday is the birthday day?! Great fun to be going to the park to watch it - that will be a memorable birthday event. and yes poor Moon - slip sliding away ..

@ Gingi - I've never seen an aurora ... it's on my bucket list too .. I certainly hope you and hubby get to see one together at some stage -

Cheers to you all .. Hilary

Christine Rains said...

What a fascinating post. I love learning all these little facts about the heavens. My new word today is haptics! Have a lovely week.

cleemckenzie said...

I wonder what your blog post would look like if you set out to write a long one? :-)

This was amazing. I think you set a new record for yourself here.

Those natural celestial events must be spellbinding. I get goosebumps with a simple shower of comets!

beste barki said...

What a delightful post Hilary. I am going to read it one more time now.

DMS said...

I love astronomy and learning more about the universe. I know there have been many solar flares lately, but I haven't seen any of the aurora activity where I live. I would love to see the Northern Lights (or Southern Lights) one day. :) Beautiful pictures to go with your fascinating post. So much to soak in. :)
~Jess

dolorah said...

Lots happening in our universe :) Those Auroras are beautiful. I wish to see it someday.

Karen Lange said...

Interesting and colorful stuff! Those Auroras are amazing. The wonders of creation never cease to amaze me. Appreciate the info and your insight. Have a great week! :)

Lynn said...

I was wishing I could see the coverage of Richard III's funeral - I'll bet it was amazing to watch.

Nick Wilford said...

Wow, I now know much more in depth about these events as I didn't watch all the TV coverage. No idea the Northern Lights had been visible in Britain or Jupiter's moons were visible in the night sky!

Trisha F said...

I love this post! I am fascinated by all things astronomy, and have always wished I had a more scientific brain that could have taken me into that field professionally.

I know it's very dark and 'insane' of me, but I sort of wish I could be around to see the sun implode/explode and swallow the earth ;)

Margie said...

Fascinating post, I love the moon and have written many poems on it.

Hope all is going well with you, Hilary.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Christine - thanks .. it was fun to write up - though the cutting room floor is littered with extras! Haptics is a good word isn't it ..

@ Lee - well you can see a few of them where I've separated them into parts 1,2,3 and occasionally 4!

Thanks so much - it was a matter of knitting all the info into one - Richard was an exception to the celestial rule .. but he and his queen had celestial elements in the eclipses.

I loved seeing the comet in the sky as a kid - when it scooted across the night sky ..

@ Beste - so pleased you enjoyed it ..

@ Jess - there was a lot .. but if I don't get it up into the blog - I'll forget about it ...

I learnt an awful lot too .. and I'd love to see an Aurora sometime ...

@ Donna - the Auroras always fascinate don't they .. and lots of us would like to see one sometime ..

@ Karen - yes could be very colourful in a few million years - but we won't be around ... and another Aurora fan. Life and the universe are extraordinary aren't they ..

@ Lynn - it'll be on your tv at some stage - they were showing it .. another blogger mentioned it. The reinterment of Richard III was pretty amazing ...

@ Nick - there was a lot going on ... I'm glad I picked up some bits and rewatched others ... or searched a bit and found some of the info.

You missed the Northern Lights ... being outside Glasgow if it wasn't cloudy - they'd have been quite bright I'd have thought ..

Being shown the 4 moons and Jupiter by the StarGazing Live team was fascinating and learning more about the movement of the constellations was fascinating ...

@ Trish - I just enjoy picking up these bits of information - meaning I can understand the simple parts ... so am delighted you enjoyed the post. We get to see the easy bits ... there's lots of research going on too.

I'm like you - I'd like to see what happens with the earth and moon, stars and the universe ... just not sure I'd like the heat!! Or being burnt much!!

@ Margie - thanks so much .. the moon fascinates so many of us ... and poems from the Man in the Moon as a child to expressive ones such as those you write .. always remind us the moon is there .. .

Thanks everyone - so lovely to see you .. cheers Hilary

Vanessa Morgan said...

I didn't know that the Zodiac had changed. That might explain why my horoscope is never correct :)

mail4rosey said...

I hope you catch the partial eclipse in 2016. The wait for the next one is pretty long. My youngest will be 82 in 2090. ;)

The facts are fun! It's amazing what can be foretold with such accuracy.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Vanessa - nor did I realise the zodiac had changed and yes our horoscope - except I seem to fit mine!

@ Rosey - I expect we will ... and I certainly won't see the 2090 one .. sad, but true!!

Glad you enjoyed the facts and notes ...

Cheers to you both - Hilary

Julie Flanders said...

So I have to wait until 2017 to see the next eclipse here. I hope you get to see the partial one next year. I doubt any of us will be around to see the next total!
And the Auroras are so amazing, one of my biggest wishes is to see them in person someday. :)

T. Powell Coltrin said...

Love your posts always. Eclipses are great to watch.

Stephen Tremp said...

Hilary, fascinating post! I wonder if we'll be able to pull our moon back one of these years. Wouldn;t want to lose that now do we.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Julie - I sure hope the skies will be clear for us next year - but it is in August ... not long til 2017 - though I've no wish to wish time away!

I suspect you might be right that we're unlikely to be around in 2090! The Auroras would be incredible to see ..

@ Teresa - thanks so much .. Eclipses are definitely worth seeing - in fact all these sights are - well I'd rather not be around when the sun explodes out ...

@ Stephen - thanks for visiting and glad you enjoyed it .. I wonder if we'll be able to keep hold of the moon - the skies are constantly changing ...

Thanks so much .. cheers Hilary

Empty Nest Insider said...

How fascinating to actually see an eclipse! This was a wonderful preview of things to come during A to Z, Hilary!

Julie

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Julie - yes three .. I saw one at school years ago .. (centuries ago?!) - but glad you enjoyed the post .. and hope the A-Z satisfies .. cheers Hilary

Deniz Bevan said...

I find this stuff fascinating, Hilary, thanks for collecting it all in one place! Especially about the tides, the mirror on the moon, and the zodiac changing...
I love getting the BBC in Geneva -- we watched Richard III's funeral on the day. All I know about him comes from Josephine Tey :-)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Deniz - so glad you enjoyed the post - lots more in the editing room of Word docs! It's been an interesting time ..

I'm so pleased you can get the BBC to see some of the events - and Richard III's funeral was something else - totally unique ..

Yes I have the Josephine Tey's book "The Daughter of Time" here - my uncle was devoted to her take on Richard .. I never got to read it - something I'm debating doing! Cheers Hilary

D.G. Hudson said...

Coming by very late, Hilary, but we have been following the news about Richard III, I find it quite interesting. I've been around to see one eclipse of the sun (partial). We had to look at it with protection of some sort. Can't remember the date. Lots happening in the UK with supermoons, and supertides. Good thing we have you to keep us informed.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks DG - always happy to have late comments pop up, after being read through by friends who are interested .. and I'm glad the post satisfied - there was a lot to that one ..

We had one when I was in my teens at school and I remember looking through my grey jumper - not sure that was the best thing to do .. but my eyes thankfully are fine ..

Appreciate your comment and as I like the learning I enjoy posting .. cheers Hilary