Monday, 14 December 2015

West Country Tour – Bodmin Moor … Part 9 …



We are now off to see the Hurled Stones “The Hurlers”, a Dolmen: “Trethevy Quoit”, some granite cheeses piled up as a “Cheesewring” all to be found on Bodmin Moor …

View from the pub


… a little fresh air was required (it’s about the coldest I’ve been this year) … still we had a wander amongst the Hurlers and viewed the Cheesewring from afar.  Lovely area though … we usually whizzed through on our way to Penzance or St Ives – where parent or family lived.






Jenny having a good inspection of Trethevy Quoit



First getting up close and personal with Trethevy Quoit was quite awe-inspiring … as I haven’t had that experience for decades, then it was with the Neolithic henges and megaliths of Penwith (west Cornwall), with my mother.






It is a portal tomb and now stands (rebuilt) atop the landscape in all its magnificence … it is known locally as “the giant’s house” – standing 9 feet (2.7m) high – that nickname makes perfect sense.


Pub Sign relating to the legend

The Hurlers – love the name of these henges (circles) – they derive from a legend, in which men were playing Cornish hurling, a Celtic game, on a Sunday … and were for punishment dramatically transformed into stones.





Showing some of the Standing Stones
in the Hurlers


Well it was a Sunday … would we survive?  Looks like we did … there’s a bit more of anexplanation in my “H” post in this year’s A-Z.


We could see the “Cheesewring” in the distance from the Hurlers … named after a press-like device that was once used to make cheese.  The granite slabs are 32 feet high (nearly 10 metres).





Wilkie Collins described the Cheesewring in 1861 in his book “Rambles Beyond the Railways”:
The Cheesewring with a person
to give the perspective


‘If a man dreams of a great pile of stones in a nightmare, he would dream of such a pile as the Cheesewring.  All the heaviest and largest of the seven thick slabs are at the top; all the lightest and smallest at the bottom.'







Bodmin Moor pony


… then what does fresh air give you … a grumbling tummy for some lunch … so off we went – I can’t remember the name of the pub – but they had timber ‘cottages’ in the small spinney in the grounds – with a viewing platform out over Bodmin Moor.






My roast pork - with the ubiquitous Yorkshire pudding ...
gravy was on its way, as too apple sauce


They specialised in a real Sunday roast … with all the trimmings, which we followed with a traditional type dessert … I had crumble … Jenny had her meringue, ice-cream, Cornish cream and toffee sauce …





Roast Beef ... more gravy was following!



… we went very sadly on our way – I definitely was in the mood for a Sunday afternoon on the sofa … in a heap, letting my lunch enjoy itself … and I hadn’t had a glass of wine, or a cider … sad really!






Apple and Blackberry Crumble with
Cornish Cream

… but our next Emily spot was calling and now the clocks had gone back … it would be dark by 5.00 pm or so … more West Country tour posts to follow in the New Year ... 





One very happy Jenny!




Have a happy last few days build up to Christmas and on towards the New Year ... all the best ... I have a few more non West Country tour posts ...






I have one final Emily post before Christmas ... which warrants some reading and thinking about - but as it is appropriate for this time of year ... I will post now - and then it's available for reading, when anyone feels like it.


Our time with Sally and her husband was one of the highlights of our tour ... as here meeting new friends, then later on near-relatives I had never met ... 


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories


54 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

The Cheesewring is incredible. Yet another thing where we can only wonder how? And then why? Loved the Hurlers and the Quoit too.
That lunch looked pretty good as well.

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

That Trethevy Quoit is impressive! That must have taken such incredible effort back then. Glad you didn't get turned into stone during your Sunday excursion, ha! Too bad the Cornish hurlers weren't so lucky. :)

Out on the prairie said...

Amazing area, I love the huge stones. There is almost a feeling when close to help imagine what took place when they were placed. the yorkshire pudding tops off the meal, a favorite of mine.

Betsy Brock said...

Those stone piles are just amazing...and I love the clouds in your photos, too! But those plates of food stole the show! haha... and that lovely dessert at the end? Wow!

Elsie Amata said...

Those massive stones remind me of Red Rocks in Colorado. So beautiful. We went exploring in Colorado Springs at visited Garden of the Gods. Just amazing how beautiful it was. Thank you so much for sharing these.

Christine Rains said...

How incredible. They're so huge. Love the name Hurlers too! And wow, yes, I'd be as happy as Jenny with that delicious dessert in front of me. :) Have a lovely week.

Manzanita said...

I guess there are a good number of stones or big rocks, like that but the
only ones I've seen for real is Stonehenge, I always wonder how it was done.
Then I think it must have been performed by aliens who lived here before
humans. I wonder is we'll ever really know? Perhaps not.

That plate of veggies looks mighty inviting. I just shoveled a ton of snow (before breakfast)
and I guess I really worked up an appetite. LOL Boy, it's really coming down here and that
means a lot more shoveling. Rats.
Take care of yourself and so long for now.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Wow, what is Jenny eating there?
Some amazing stone structures.

Murees Dupé said...

Magnificent stone structures. I can just imagine how beautiful they were up close. Ooh, like always, you do not disappoint with great pictures of the food and dessert:) Happy Holidays.

Patsy said...

Gosh that's an impressive looking dessert! I think I'd struggle and I'm very good at desserts.

I'm always fascinated by henges, standing stones and stone burial chambers. The effort which must have been required to make them shows they were very important and we still have many of them to study, yet we still know so little about them.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC - those 'monuments' are all awesome and Trethevy Quoit was quite something. Exactly ... re the Cheesewring we can wonder, we know the how - the different granite layers, the why - geological forces ... twists and turns of the earth. All good and ending with lunch with friends - extra special.

@ Elizabeth - Trethevy amazes me now to look at it ... and how they moved those stones is beyond our reckoning so far. Well frankly I'm very glad I'm not on Bodmin Moor turned to stone ... the lore makes good reading and thinking about - and brings Cornish Hurling into the light of day.

@ Steve - these three neolithic monuments are incredible - and Trethevy was enormous - and what they people thought as they were constructing the tomb, they think ... we can only speculate.

I like Yorkshire pud with my beef ... but I prefer the other traditional accompaniments with each sort of meat - like seasonal veg ... but Yorkshire pud with beef is positively wonderful!

@ Betsy - the stones are quite extraordinary and have been there for millennia. The first photo is mine, the others are c/o Wiki. Plates of food - they always steal the show ... and the dessert for me was the winner - though my crumble was very good!

@ Elsie - I imagine the sandstone of Colorado has wonderful formations too - how very lovely to see the Garden of the Gods - I bet it is usually warmer than Bodmin Moor.

@ Christine - yes - they are huge ... not sure where the name "Hurlers" came from ... presumably the lore and the Celtic game. People love their desserts ... I am definitely a savoury lover - but I can see is absolutely delighted with it.

@ Manzanita - there are lots of neolithic monuments in the UK - Stonehenge is extraordinary .. they now think there is more to that area than we can see at the moment. They believe they can work out how Stonehenge was made, and how they got the stones from west Wales to Stonehenge ... they think they've worked out - beggar's belief really.

The veg were good - and are really my favourite - I think the Yorkshire went to Sally's husband! But seeing food at breakfast time is always a little unsettling .. but if I'd been shovelling snow - I'd be happy for a lunch. Oh no ... more snow and thus more shovelling - I'm glad I'm not doing that!

@ Alex - Jenny's eating a variation on a KnickerbockerGlory ... hers had caramel with it - Cornish cream, ice-cream and meringue and no doubt some other tasty bits and bobs! She is happy though ...

The arrangements of the stones is very interesting as to the how and the whys ...

@ Murees - magnificent is another word too. Daunting, stunning and harshly beautiful ... and then yes once you've hurled - you may have a roast followed by a dessert!

@ Patsy - it's almost a henge-like dessert isn't it. I was struggling with my crumble ... but it was all delicious.

Our henges, standing stones and stone burial chambers always just sort of put one down - I can't imagine trying to do it, let alone succeeding or in the case of Stonehenge dragging stones 150 miles ... strikes me as crazy - I don't think I'd have made a good neolithic woman! The archaeologists and paleontologists are very determined to find how the whys for us ... they keep proposing credible new thoughts ...

Cheers to you and thank you for visiting .. Hilary

Joanne said...

those stones are wonderful. I could feel the bracing wind and hear Celtic cries in the distance. I want some blueberry crumble now....

Suzanne Furness said...

I find the stones fascinating and there are so many in Cornwall to see. Glad you enjoyed the visit.

Chrys Fey said...

That Cheesewring is amazing! I would love to see that. Standing stones have always fascinated me. And yum...gosh you're making me hungry and darn this dental surgery! I can't eat!

Chrys Fey said...

That Cheesewring is amazing! I would love to see that. Standing stones have always fascinated me. And yum...gosh you're making me hungry and darn this dental surgery! I can't eat!

cleemckenzie said...

Amazing stone engineering. I'm always in awe when I see these towering slabs--even the rebuilt ones.

Of course, that dessert was pretty spectacular as well, but after all that hiking around it was well deserved.

Vallypee said...

Seeing those hurlers takes me back to my youth, Hilary. Aren't they wonderful? And your lunch looks so incredibly scrummy! I haven't had proper English Sunday dinner for so many years, I've forgotten what it tastes like. Maybe I should try it myself!

Sherry Ellis said...

Those stone structures remind me of Stonehenge. They're impressive. I wonder what compelled people to create them.

Paula Kaye said...

Oh my goodness. I don't know which I enjoyed more...the pictures of those marvelous stones...or of the delicious and wonderful food!!

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

What incredible sights! They would be so fascinating to see in person. And your meal looks so delicious. Now I have to go make some dinner and it will be pathetic in comparison.

Lowcarb team member said...

Lovely post and those stones ... wow!
Your meals to, and that 'knickerbocker glory' ... well that's what I would call it, look lovely.

Hope you have a good week

All the best Jan

Carol Z said...

Loved my visit to England without leaving my house. I hope to visit St. Ives one day and will add this area to my itinerary.

Stephen Tremp said...

Now that's what I call a sundae! I love toffee but over here it's not a staple when it comes to the ice cream treats. You can find it, but hot fudge, caramel, and strawberry sauce are what you'll find here.

beste barki said...

It has been wonderful virtually traveling with you Hilary.

DMS said...

So much to soak in from this post. Such a beautiful area to be traveling about for sure and we are so lucky to travel with you via your words and photos. Your food looks so good, and the sights are just stunning. Thanks for sharing. :) ~Jess

Sharon K. Mayhew said...

Absolutely amazing photos! You are so lucky to be able to travel and see all these places and we are so lucky that you share them with us. One day I'll come to England to sight see....LOL

Bob Suker said...

That looks like nice country, H. I wouldn't mind seeing it for myself.
Are the old stones from Druid days, or later?
Lunch looked great too, but I wonder what you Brits see in those Yorkshire puds. hahaha

Denise Covey said...

So much in this post, Hilary, but my eyes kept returning to the traditional British lunch. Yum! A cider would have finished it off well. Those old stones certainly make us ponder don't they? Looking forward to your next post.

Denise :-)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Joanne – the three circles are quite extraordinary up there in the landscape - the Celtic cries ring out slightly later in the time frame (5,000 years earlier?!). Blackberry crumble – delicious!

@ Suzanne – as a Cornish lady … you know all too well how many of these incredible monuments there are. Writing about them has brought back memories of my childhood visits to our Penwith (west Cornwall) ones.

@ Chrys – we didn’t get close to the Cheesewring – and didn’t have time for a ‘hike’. The standing stones … still leave us wondering about so much. Sorry about the food – but hope the dental surgery has gone well and you can be back to eating soon.

@ Lee – I have no idea how they got the stones into three circles with a ‘doorway’ (portal) – without mechanical tools. They uncovered this dolmen and decided to rebuild it – a good idea … I think.

If we’d hiked … we might have deserved the meringue knickerbocker glory ... but we’d wandered not far to see the Hurlers. But impressive visit.

@ Val – the Hurlers are amazing to stand amongst … I really must go back another day and then up to the Cheesewring.

An English roast is always special … why not give it a try … it’s fairly easy to do. I hope you give it a go.

@ Sherry – yes … these circles aren’t quite so ‘perfect’ as Stonehenge – which really stands up in the landscape. No-one knows the reason for them being built – lots of thoughts … almost certainly some form of spiritual reason – a blessing for the sun and life. It’d be nice to find out … still the wondering is good too …

Part 2 following ...

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Paula – Standing Stones or the Roasts … difficult decision – but the one followed the other!

@ Susan – getting up close and personal to these Neolithic monuments makes one realise how incredible they are … and really wonder at our ancestors’ abilities. A roast out usually surpasses a normal dinner – but I’m sure yours was just fine and very tasty.

@ Jan – thanks … the visit to the Moor brought back many memories and writing about the Stones, while shortly afterwards eating a roast with the ‘meringue cream knickerbocker glory’ was a very good combination for the day.

@ Carol – that’s good .. different to your walk around Fifth Avenue in New York – amazing windows they have. Cornwall and St Ives are wonderful … but I’ve enjoyed this brief run around with Jenny – and found so many interesting subjects that I didn’t know about. Good to see you here – thanks for visiting.

@ Stephen – It was the Cornish Cream that did it for Jenny – she doesn’t get it in Canada … so took her opportunity. Certainly some variation seemed to appear on every menu – so Jenny was very happy. We have a variety of sauces too – keeps everyone well fed!

@ Beste – thanks so much .. the other half of the virtual tour next year.

@ Jess – just very happy to know you’re enjoying travelling with me from behind your screen! That’s great – at least I can show you what’s around in little old England.

@ Sharon – I wish the photos were mine … some are! Thankfully the journey wasn’t far … but this little internet tour seemed the best way to offer you all a lift and come with me as I shared some of the sights.

That will be great … and perhaps we can travel round together for part of the time …

@ Bob – well it’s here for a visit and we don’t have the vast spaces you have – but we do have crowded roads! Still it’s lovely … and really what I call ‘home’. The Druids appear in the Iron Age, before that was the Bronze Age, while the Stones are from the Stone Age – even earlier. To a point the Druids have been reinvented via literature in the last three hundred years or so …

I like freshly cooked Yorkshire puds in the fat from the beef … thus I’m not keen on them otherwise … i.e. my mother’s Yorkshire puds!

@ Denise – there was so much to tell – but I needed to curtail the writing … and when we were looking at the Stones on the Moor we needed to move on to lunch. Nothing can beat a traditional British Sunday lunch – that is true. A cider would have finished me off that day – and I needed to drive on … not far … but through the lanes before dark.

Life was so different in Neolithic times – with nothing mechanical to help with living, everything was done because it had to be on a daily basis: so we can only wonder in amazement at their achievements.

Thanks to you all – lovely to have all your comments and thoughts …. enjoy the rest of the week before Christmas comes rocking through … cheers Hilary

Sara C. Snider said...

Jenny's dessert looks incredible. It's almost as big as she is! And the Cheesewring, what an odd name for an amazing structure. Very fascinating, thanks, Hilary. :)

Annalisa Crawford said...

I've never been to Bodmin Moor. I love your photos - I'll have to get myself over that way soon. For the roast as much as the moor :-)

Mary Montague Sikes said...

Hilary, you have some of the most interesting locations to visit. Your meals look delicious. Thanks for sharing the lovely photos!

Thanks for visiting my cat post!

Hart Johnson said...

I love those stones--the story with the hurlers is excellent but the cheese ring pile is amazing. They really DO lead to good stories, as the natural explanations are so implausible.

Connie Arnold said...

Those stones are fascinating! Thank you for sharing the great photos and as always another interesting post, Hilary! It's wonderful to be able to travel and see unusual things like this and to see where others have traveled and what they've seen.

rosaria williams said...


Thanks for taking us along. It turned out that I had no knowledge at all of these places; so, I too got quite hungry, in my virtual travels, and enjoyed your lunch, albeit virtuaL FOR ME.

rosaria williams said...

P.S. THE VERIFICATION TEST IS IRRITATING. bUT THEN, WHAT ELSE IS THERE THAT IS NOT IRRITATING IN MATTERS OF SECURITY.

Jeffrey Scott said...

Once more, some great information. I remember reading about the Hurlers in your A-Z of this year.
And more good food you are posting!
Excuse me, I just started drooling on my keyboard.

Susan Scott said...

What a lovely post Hilary thank you! Fantastic photos and o my stars that food, TTDF (totally to die for). Those stones ... so impressive. Yes, Christmas is looming, already drinks parties, dinners, lunches .. my waist is slowly expanding ..

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sara - the dessert was tall - but Jenny managed to get her spoon into it and enjoyed it - the thought was sheer delight by the look of her smile! The Cheesewring looks like an old fashioned cheese press: hence its name.

@ Annalisa - well that's good - it's worth a visit and the Moor is lovely. I'll find out the pub's name at some stage and let you know. It's not far from you after all.

@ Monti - we were lucky to be taken to these locations ... and as I'd never seen them - I was very pleased. The meal was good - and am glad the photos match up. Your cat post was a delight.

@ Hart - the Stones are quite extraordinary. I'm happy you enjoyed this post and to 'see' through my eyes this part of the world and where others over the centuries and millennia have travelled.

The cheesewring - is a natural phenomena ... but the Quoit and the Hurlers are man made - the hows and whys elude us ... probably for ever.

@ Connie - the Stones are extraordinary. So pleased you've enjoyed the photos and their stories. I love seeing different parts of our country - and spot areas where so many have travelled before.

@ Rosaria - it's a pleasure and I'm glad you could at least 'see' a little something about Bodmin Moor and its stony inhabitants. Having plates of food in blog posts isn't always helpful to one's stomach is it - I get hungry writing about them.

The WV is not my decision .. Blogger for some reason put it on - I came across it as well on someone else's blog. It didn't function - but I'll check behind the scenes at some stage -if it pops up. I've no idea why! So - sorry but not me!!

@ Jeffrey - that's great the Hurlers registered from my A-Z earlier in the year. More food - always need that! Sorry about your damp keyboard ...

@ Susan - delighted to see you here. The roast was pretty good - very filling ... and my waistline expanded on that trip too: now it's Christmas and it's expanding once again.

Thanks to you all - it's wonderful having such a great set of readers and being able to show you some of our countryside and sustain you with some food along the way .. cheers Hilary

Annalisa Crawford said...

To Rosaria, Hilary and anyone else who hates the verification... You can just ignore it. It should make no difference. I never press the 'I am not a robot' button, and my comments are always accepted. Hope this helps :-)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Annalisa - thanks ... and I know many blogs have put a note on to ignore the robot catcher bit: I didn't worry as so many others have it.

As far as I know it appeared without warning round about A-Z time this year ..

But recently I did come across another Blogger's blog - where I couldn't comment without putting in (proving) I'm not a robot ...

... but that's been the only one til Rosaria mentioned it in this post ...

... so I sort of think it's spasmodic - hence my 'comment' I'd look into it - as I've no idea.

Usually things come out in the wash for us bloggers - and we ascertain what's going on ... I hope this will be the case this time.

Any other ideas by anyone else I'm grateful to know about .. cheers Hilary

mail4rosey said...

That's some heavy lifting with the stones! I think your adventures (and food!) sound happy and were a great way to spend your time. :)

TexWisGirl said...

well, ending with that meal and those desserts certainly was a high note, but those STONES are incredible!! what a marvelous/marvel-filled place!

Deborah Weber said...

What fabulous stones. Boggles the mind but makes the heart happy. As does Jenny's culinary monster. :-)

Vanessa Morgan said...

What a fascinating place. I really hope to visit one day.
And that food.... Aaaah :-)

Lynn said...

I'm always fascinated by standing stones. The ones you visited are amazing!

Jenny's dessert looks so good! And I've never had Yorkshire pudding - I'll bet it's good.

Dianne K. Salerni said...

The Giant's House and the Cheesewring are marvellous! I just know that ancient people had more engineering know-how than we give them credit for. The knowledge may have been lost, but they built these structures somehow -- and I doubt it was with alien help. :)

M Pax said...

I'm very hungry now, and I just ate lunch. :)

What a lovely outing you had with such magnificent scenery. The henges and stones are really neat. I would love to explore those.

And I've always been curious about the moors. I've read quite a few books set in them.

Arlee Bird said...

I can only wonder how they managed to manipulate these gigantic stones. People long ago managed some amazing things. Maybe had too much time on their hands?

Arlee Bird
Tossing It Out

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

I'm in total awe of those Standing Stones. The Hurlers was quite a game and should never be confused with another type of hurling that often occurs outside UK kebab shops, especially on a Friday night.

Seriously, your tales of the West Country will become legendary and thus, thank you for another insight into your world, Hilary.

Gary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Rosey - this tour was Jenny's idea and our local hosts took us off to see the Moor with its stones ... we had a good time.

@ Theresa - lunch was good ... but the stones, now I look at them from the blog, are absolutely amazing aren't they ... marvellous marvels!

@ Deborah - getting up close to the Stones was a treat and does boggle the mind, as you say. But the countryside makes my heart happy - as did our lunch.

@ Vanessa - I hope you can get down to see Cornwall and Devon with their stones one day ... the food was recommended by our hosts.

@ Lynn - I think we're all fascinated by our Standing Stones and they still reveal secrets or a scientists promotes another idea, which gets looked into. Jenny's dessert did look good didn't it ...

The Yorkshire pudding came about from waste not want not: cooks in the north of England used up the fat from the roast roasting by baking a batter in the pan ... ultimately bun tins were used, not an oven dish, giving individual Yorkshires. There are a variety of methods ... but they are good.

@ Dianne - I agree those ancients were incredibly inventive when it came to working out how to do things - and how they moved those stones is anyone's guess. The Quoit was recreated because much damage had been done in earlier times investigating the dolmen ... There will be records on the re-creation. However in our times - I don't think the aliens appeared, any more than they did 7,000 years ago.

@ Mary - sorry about the roasts! I'm hungry now too - and it's breakfast time - difficult reading blogs at all times of day. The 'tour' was very informative ... and being able to see some of these incredible monuments and the Moor was an extra treat. I hope one day you can get over and explore some of these areas ... they are unique.

@ Lee - the way they moved those enormous stones does beggar belief doesn't it ... I don't think the ancients ever sat around - far too busy making sure things were done for the day, and a day or two ahead - no let up at all, I suspect.

@ Gary - these Standing Stones were very impressive - and I've never walked up close to them as I did this time. The Hurling legend is a fun one to know about ... while kebab shops I'll leave I think!.

Thanks so much re my write ups of the tour ... they're not masterpieces, but are fun and it's great knowing the blogging fraternity will read them ...

Cheers everyone - so wonderful to see you all and get your comments - Hilary

Beate said...

These stone formations are so amazing! Keith and I would love to visit those places some day and see them for ourselves :) That pony is so cute and all the food you had looks SO delicious. It actually makes me hungry again right now ;) I'm so happy for you you had such a wonderful trip :)
I hope you are doing well!
Have an amazing Christmas week.
Lots of hugs,
Beate

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Beate - sometimes I don't seem to get notified of comments - then pop back to have a look at something and find a comment left.

How lovely to see you - well at least the UK is nearer to you both now, than from the USA. The ponies on the Moor were a delight to see. The food was good as we travelled round ...

Now it's Christmas week - more food is around! Lovely to read your post and to hear your news ... take care and have the most amazing Christmas and New Year and then the best 2016 - cheers Hilary