Sunday, 31 January 2016

West Country Tour … a Rising Sun lunch and characteristics of a 14th C Inn … part 16 …



Before we left Lynmouth … we stopped for lunch at the Rising Sun – a 14th C thatched smugglers inn overlooking the harbour and bay – lots of history here too.

Rising Sun pub sign


There’s oak panelling, crooked ceilings, thick beach-stone walls and creaking uneven floorboards … roaring fires, a healthily stocked bar, fireplaces warming weary bones or drying damp bodies … a typical ancient pub … that has changed very little in 700 years.







The actual Rising Sun Pub and Hotel

History rings out at us too – displays, old signs, authors’ time spent here, old tars’ stories … chapters of Lorna Doone being written here … Shelley honeymooned here – his cottage now forming part of the hotel.





From the Rising Sun site - a view up the rivers' valley
of the two Lyn rivers


Crooked staircases, narrow passageways, sloping floors and low beams are still here – but modern facilities have been introduced …






The Board says it all:
West Country fish delivered daily



… utterly delicious food gives the Inn that extra luxurious touch to an ancient fishing and mining area … locally landed lobsters, Exmoor game and fresh fish … quality feasting with a European twist bringing it all up to date.








Jenny's Devon Blue

Jenny and I had West Country Plates … Jenny had the Devon Blue with roasted tomato chutney, pickled onions, poached fig and homemade bread … 




My Chicken Liver Parfait


... I had the Chicken Liver Parfait with homemade chutney, cornichons, mixed salad and warm toast.





The lifeboat "Louisa" and details
of the two models from the framed data -
which I note in the post itself.
The Lynton and Lynmouth Lifeboat – an exact replica, scale 1:18, of the lifeboat, "Louisa", I mentioned in my previous post – which was the lifeboat involved in the epic overland journey to Porlock Weir to rescue 18 men, in January 1899.



The "Louisa" was specially built in 1887, at a cost of £298 and 14 shillings.  It had all the modern technology available at the time and was the latest type of self-righting lifeboat.




Details at right as per story in the frame.



The 17th Century Statenjacht - this is also an exact replica, scale 1:30, of the 17th century Dutch Statenjacht “Mary”.






The Dutch admiralty purchased a “jacht” (meaning swift craft or hunter) and presented it to Charles II on his re-accession to the English throne in 1660.  We changed the name to ‘yacht’ but it is said that Charles II originated the sport of yachting with this particular boat.


I don't have the details re this and it might have been
a 'Barquentine' ... the island depicted on the right is
labelled 'New Britain' and is part of Papua New Guinea



More history here to explore at another time … and perhaps one day to spend a couple of nights here … just enjoying the ambience and relishing being in a tiny harbour village with a connecting funicular to its town above.



The bar at the Rising Sun


I think this will have whetted your appetite to see the hills that that lifeboat was hauled and pushed up … and to join Jenny and I as we really do now move on to Minehead in Somerset – our last formal stop.  Not quite the end … a few more posts to go …



Shelley's History:  This is an interesting read with some pictures … reference is made to the Shelley’s life, George Ley is mentioned: the Pack O’ Cards pub owner … Mary Godwin – Shelley’s second wife.  Also the history of the area over the 100 years and reminds us of Shelley’s seditious paper “Declaration of Rights” – which was written here.   See my previous Combe Martin post ... 


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

53 comments:

Patsy said...

OK, you've convinced me. If we're ever in the area, we'll pop into The Rising Sun.

Vallypee said...

Fascinating, Hilaty. I learn so much. The pub sounds lovely, but I was very interested in both the lifeboat and the yachting stories. Boats you know.

Madeleine Sara said...

Looks wonderful Hilary, a great trip. Enjoyable vicariously through this post, too. x

Bob Scotney said...

I don't think I can make there in time for lunch.

Anabel Marsh said...

Gorgeous inn and village! The sort of place I'd love to stay, and that Devon Blue plate would suit me down to the ground.

Out on the prairie said...

What a great place for lunch. I admire how the building remain over the centuries. We often tear down the old for something new.

Jo said...

Looks a delightful spot for lunch and the oysters would attract me. Your lunches looked great. Unlikely to visit that part of the world ever again but it is great to read about it. So much history. Particularly interested to learn about the jacht - despite my involvement with boats for many years I had not heard that before.

Inger said...

Locally landed lobsters! I love it and I also love the way you set up this post with the smaller photos to go with the written word. These historical places, old, old inns and pubs and local stories going back centuries are some of the things I miss the most about Europe.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Not only were the actual boats impressive, but those replicas are amazing. Imagine the patience required to make them.

beste barki said...

"A typical ancient pub … that has changed very little in 700 years" is music to my ears. It is my belief that preserving the past anywhere and as much as possible teaches us about ourselves. It gives us roots.

Rhodesia said...

Another great post with so much interesting history. Think I must get a copy of Lorna Doone, I read it so many years ago I have forgotten it. Hope you are well Diane

A Heron's View said...

Well, guess what I was never in the Rising Sun and more is the pity for my mouth is still watering from reading the menu. For fish is and always has been my favourite food.
Very interesting to know where the name of yacht originated from and strange that I was never told because I my working life started off in a small Devon shipbuilders yard.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Patsy – it’s well worth the visit .. as too the area around Lynmouth and Lynton. Should be good – I’d like to go again.

@ Val – thanks so much .. I thought the boats might appeal … the lifeboat stories from around the British Isles always amaze me; while the yacht – I’d have never have known about. I do know ‘boats’ … !!

@ Madeleine – thanks so glad ‘you, the Devonian’ are enjoying this tour round!

@ Bob – nope … sadly you’d have missed lunch today – but you could still get there for tomorrow!

@ Anabel – it certainly is a lovely harbour with its traditional inn. Wonderful views from the hotel … I too would like to stay there. The West Country platters of food were just what we needed at that stage of the day … and a good cheese is always delicious … but my pate was delicious.

@ Steve – thankfully we tend to keep our buildings – not always, though. We have many ‘listed’ buildings – which put preservation orders on the buildings, so that they can’t be altered too much, and makes sure they’re not ‘messed around’ with/ altered out of keeping with the fabric of the place – ie the old methods are used, or adapted to modern usage. My post on Canterbury Cathedral highlighted this ..

@ Jo – I think the whole menu would be difficult to choose from – I’d have loved to have had oysters … but not as a snack: I needed to be staying! I’m glad you’re enjoying reading things about the coast and snippets from Devon. The ‘jacht’ was an interesting find at the Rising Sun.

@ Inger – I’m glad the post interested you and thank you re the photos – it helps bringing the post to life. It’s what I missed about living in South Africa – so I know how you feel .. and can quite understand you missing Sweden, your home, and remembering the time you lived in England … yes the culture of our life through the centuries is wonderful to have. Thankfully we are recording more and more …

@ Alex – the craftsmanship of the shipbuilders always impresses and they were to be found in all harbours or ports. I know my fingers can’t produce those sorts of models – such patience and the ability to be able to design in their head.

@ Beste – yes - - it is a typical ancient pub – they are dotted around all over England. Exactly – that culture is so important – as Inger says above .. it’s something she misses about being in California and not here in Europe, as I did too in South Africa .. we have our deep roots, that structure of life from which we came, which we have access to here in Europe.

@ Diane – so happy you’re enjoying the historical snippets I write up. I just bought a copy of Lorna Doone … so must read it … as too some other books I’ve mentioned as we go round.

@ Mel – well I’m sorry about the Rising Sun miss! You’d have enjoyed it, and I’d have loved to have lingered – and go back now?! Fish is wonderful isn’t it …

Were you in a small Devon shipbuilder’s yard – how fascinating … perhaps that connection hadn’t been made back then?!

Thanks so much – it’s wonderful so many of you are (still) enjoying my tour … and then for adding to the post via the comments … cheers Hilary

D.G. Hudson said...

I do like the look of that village where the pub is, and a funicular, too? I learned about those in Paris. Haven't taken one yet, though. You do find some interesting places, and I've always wanted to visit the English and French coasts. Thanks for showing us such sights, Hilary!

Elephant's Child said...

Jenny's plate sounds delicious. Yours? Not for me.
I have been loving travelling with you. Thank you so very much.

loverofwords said...

Another place to visit, would love to do your tour in the next few years. Pubs and "Pub Grub" have no counterpart here in the US, There is such a warm, cozy feeling when you step into a pub, at least that is how I remember them.

Suzanne Furness said...

That sounds like a wonderful place to visit. I will make a mental note to visit if we are in the area. You have certainly made many happy memories on your trip.

Lynn said...

I think I've loved reading about what you and Jenny ate the most. :) I've loved reading about your travels - I hate to see it end!

N. R. Williams said...

I Hilary
What fun to explore that town. If I ever have money I will come to Great Britain. It's number on my bucket lists outside of State side locations.
Nancy

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

It's so difficult to image eating in a place so old and full of history. And you don't even have to invent stories about who might have dined or drank there because the true tales are so interesting.

Denise Covey said...

Hi Hilary! The Rising Sun reminds me of my favourite English pub--The Wheatsheaf at Kent. Oh, I can still imagine those crackling fires, dark brown polished wood and scrummy food! Not exactly what I'd be looking for here in Oz in the sweltering summer--prawns and chilled wine is more the go...:-)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ DG - I hadn't realised there was a funicular there ... and I gather there are a few in England - I'd been on one in Wales at Machynlleth. It is the water-balanced funicular that fascinated me. That journey I will take next time I'm down. The coast-line is beautiful on our islands ... variety abounds. Glad you're enjoying the tour.

@ EC - thanks for visiting. Well at least there was a choice ... other cheeses too, but I fancied the chicken parfait ... and I was not disappointed. So glad you too are enjoying our travels.

@ Nat - certainly this is a place to visit ... quite amazing. Our pubs reflect our English life don't they ... and yes, the warm cozy feel is definitely there.

@ Suzanne - well I hope you get to visit Lynmouth and surrounding area - it's very picturesque and full of history. I am drawing the trip out - aren't I .. but as you say memories ... so important and there's so much to learn too.

@ Lynn - food always brings out the taste-buds in us doesn't it ... and I know many will be interested in the types of food we sampled. It will be a big hole in my blogging head when the series eventually finishes!

@ Nancy - that's great to know you'd love to visit here ... and I'm sure it will come about one day -there's lots to see here ... as you'll have gathered.

@ Susan - that's true .. no invention of stories for our villages, or pubs, inns or hostelries. While I really should take time to consider life in the pub over time ... so many changes in Society.

@ Denise - there are lots of Wheatsheaf named pubs .. but I suspect yours might be outside Tonbridge ... it was one of Henry V's hunting lodges - 14th century (1386 - 1422). The King of the Crystal Sceptre ... written about in December last year.

I gather you're having incredibly hot weather ... though the crackling fires, dark aged wood tables and benches where delicious pub food is served is so welcoming in the gloom of Autumn, winter and early Spring - as we wait for the sun to shine.

Thanks so much for your visits ... lovely to see you and have your comments - cheers Hilary

Susan Scott said...

Thanks Hilary, mouth watering and imagination expanding ... what more could a gal want? I tried to enlarge the menu to check out the costs, given the rand to the pound exchange rate, but was unable to ..
keep on truckin' and look forward to next posts ..

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

Shelley honeymooned there! Wow. It's hard, I think, for Americans to get a sense of the living history in the UK. If there were a place like the pub here, it would be a museum of some kind. Amazing.

And those clipper ships are so majestic looking! Boats are just not the same today.

Beate said...

Visiting little harbour villages is one of my favorite things to do when I get to be close to the ocean. It seems like you found a wonderful place here! The food looks delicious and the replicas are amazing!
Have a wonderful start into an amazing new week.
Lots of hugs to you,
Beate

Elsie Amata said...

When we were overseas, I enjoyed walking through the small villages. So pretty. I'm the only one in my family who likes Chicken Liver Parfait, and now I want to go to deli and get some. YUM!!

Christine Rains said...

Amazing replicas! Thank you for the history and the tempting food. I'd definitely love to visit.

Murees Dupé said...

Those replicas are amazing. I can just imagine how beautiful the actual ships must have looked in the open water. Glad you had a good time. Travel safely.

cleemckenzie said...

You absolutely cannot duplicate anything like an authentic 14th century pub. I'm so envious that you had lunch there. It's on my list of places to visit. A must do!

The replica of the ships are lovely. I have to show these to my husband. He'd appreciate them, too.

Joanne said...

I truly think you could compile these post into a regular travel book for visitors to buy. The descriptions are sublime and you do whet the appetite. I'm ready to pop into the pub for dinner tonight or just sit by the roaring fire. (It's from all this fresh air)

Mark Noce said...

So cool! Got to love those older pubs:) I remember visiting the King's Head in Galway a couple times and it felt like sitting inside a piece of history.

H.R. Sinclair, Southpaw said...

It's funny I never know what I like most about these posts - the area, the food, or the history! It's all so cool.

Dianne K. Salerni said...

A 700 year old smugglers inn -- how cool!

Penny the Jack Russell dog and modest internet superstar! said...

Hi human, Hilary,

Just like my human, Gary, I consider your blog a most fascinating, in-depth read. If the truth be known, I have to go over your pawsts with Gary and explain them to him.

"The Rising Sun" looks inviting. I should go in there and help myself to their tasty grub.

Thank you for this, my lovely human friend, Hilary.

Pawsitive wishes and doggy kisses,

Penny xx

DMS said...

The pub sounds so intriguing. I want to go! The history you mentioned fascinates me and now I want to visit! Sounds like a lovely time. :)
~Jess

Michael Di Gesu said...

Hi, Hilary,

What a GREAT place, so steeped in history.... This would be THE PERFECT PLACE to hold a blogger convention... although it would have to be a limited amount. It does't look like it will hold ALL OF US.. LOL.

Thanks again for sharing your travels with us. I am SOOO longing to cross the great pond and have a nice visit in your country. Maybe join you ladies on an outing or two. SUCH FUN!!!!!!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan – what more could a girl want = a longer stay! I was able to enlarge the photo .. but I’ve emailed you the photos and perhaps that will satisfy? Or horrify!! I’m off up the hills towards Somerset – when I settle to write the next post ...

@ Elizabeth – I agree … I think even the English can’t always relate … I’ve learnt a lot writing these articles for the tour … lots has slotted into place – it’s like little layers, which start making sense and building into giving me an understanding of how life over the ages came to be.

The ships are much safer now-a-days … but not as pretty, I agree – but they travelled far and wide find new lands.

@ Beate – luckily our little island has lots of coastline with a great many inlets and coves … then the pubs etc The food was good – I could have stayed a few more days!! The models were exquisite to look at …

@ Elsie – the Chicken Liver Parfait was very good indeed … it was very light and very tasty! Walking in the villages and harbours is always fun and interesting …

@ Christine – it’s well worth a visit … and the food was most definitely tempting! Creating model replicas is a work of art …

@ Murees – I think seeing those ancient ships sailing around the world must have been a sight to behold … but very difficult for those working on board.

@ Lee – having authentic pubs is one of the pleasures of the UK … and finding them in these tiny fishing harbours makes the journey pleasurable … relating back over time.

The replicas were extraordinary to see … and so I hope your husband was impressed?!

@ Joanne – thanks so much for the thought … I probably will at some stage get them into some format. Wonderful you find the descriptions sublime and I like to whet the appetite!! Walking out in the hills … you’d have been happy to find that roaring fire with a good dinner to follow … and mellow the end of the day away.

@ Mark – it’s good you’ve got some real memories of the King’s Head … and yes we sit amongst the history of years of life.

@ Holly – that’s great … to know you enjoy the various aspects I write about … I’m happy to read that!

@ Dianne – yes, there are a few around … and they are wonderful to find.

@ Penny and Gary – well I’m glad the pawsts are dog-readable and you can encourage Gary to read them! Oh no … I think that would be stealing .. and I’m sure there’s a dog-warden around, who would put you away … Gary couldn’t do without you to help him read … so please just accept your place = outside the pub enjoying the fresh air!! Lots of people to talk to and who would love seeing you!

@ Jess – it was a happy trip – which through the posts I’ve been able to add snippets I’ve found out about … I hope one day you can get over for a visit and see some of our history for yourself.

@ Michael – good to see you … and yes wouldn’t it be fun to take the village over with us blogging lot … but I think we’d totally crowd it out. We’d have to sit on Gainsborough’s, Shelley’s, Coleridge’s, Wordsworth’s or even Blackmore’s hills and valleys – then the area might accommodate us!!!

Yes .. it’d be great if you could get over sometime and we could tie in and have some blogging fun, while we journey around and have that FUN … as you so happily put it ..

Cheers to you all – thanks so much for your comments and thoughts … always love having you visit … Hilary

Nilanjana Bose said...

Wow!Lucky you to be at a place where Shelley honeymooned. Beyond fascinating.

TexWisGirl said...

pretty area and fresh fish! :)

Jeffrey Scott said...

The bar looks amazing. When I visit England next, I hope I can find some really vintage pubs, ones that have changed little over time. I once visited the Brazen Head when in Ireland. It dates back to 1198. Obviously, it's changed completely. But still cool to know it's been there in one shape or another for over 800 years.

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

Beautiful photos, Hilary. It reminds me a bit of Port Isaac, Cornwell where Doc Martin is filmed. Is it close to there? Such a lovely village. Draws me back.

Sarah Allen said...

Gorgeous photos! What a great post and great adventure!

Sarah Allen

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nila - lots of history along this coastline ... and it's so interesting to learn about.

@ Theresa - stunning area and fresh fish, which we didn't have - but we had in other places ...

@ Jeffrey - I see the Brazen Head pub is advertised as the oldest pub in Ireland ... and it's in Dublin. You're right it's changed over time .. but as you say it's so 'cool' to know a coaching inn has been there for 800 years ... I hope you can get over to satisfy your trips to the pub need!

@ Joylene - thank you ... Port Isaac is in Cornwall ... so it's further west but on the same coastline. These harbours 'are similar' - they call you ... small and a delight to see - with their history etc ...

@ Sarah - my photos are not nearly as good as yours ... but they highlight the area and my post ideas ...

Thanks so much for visiting ... our old pubs always attract visitors - be they commenters, or actual customers ... cheers Hilary

Chrys Fey said...

The view from the Rising Sun is lovely. I wish I could have lunch there now.

Hart Johnson said...

Oh, what a great old place. And I LOVE the little towns with those steep old stone stairways. They seem so cozy, possibly because they seem a bit inaccessible... like secret places.

M Pax said...

What a quaint town. Love the shot up the rivers. Beautiful scenery. That alone sells me on a visit. The fine food and history are extras. :)

A Cuban In London said...

The Rising Sun, what an apposite name! :-)

Greetings from London.

Lynda R Young said...

yep, I'd definitely love to visit there one day. You brought it alive in a way photos can't.

Karen Lange said...

Sounds like a delightful stop on your journey! Thank you for allowing us to experience and savor your visit with you. If those walls could talk, just what would they say? Fun to think about! Appreciate hearing more about your trip!

dolorah said...

What fun. You have a lot more fun on your travels than I do. I need to discover some of the history around the states I'm visiting. Granted, they will not be as steeped in tradition and culture as England.

Have a good week Hilary. Stay safe and dry :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Chrys - I know lunchtime isn't close yet - but I'd be happy to know that's where I was going!

@ Hart - all these little harbours are 'not so hidden gems' now ... and they are still relatively in accessible ... but with lots of secret places round and about.

@ Mary - very quaint and very historical, and well worth a visit - the scenery around here is amazing. Food is essential ... and history one can't escape from it.

@ ACIL - the sun rises in the village ... it is apposite.

@ Lynda - thanks so much re the bringing it alive - photos help, but don't give life to a place ... the extra notes help.

@ Karen - I was glad for lunch ... and oh yes - how many tales would be told by the walls .. intriguing to think about. Glad you're enjoying the trip.

@ Donna - It was lovely seeing places I've never been to ... and I look for more information when I get home - though keep my eyes open during my visits. That's a good idea - to look around in the towns, suburbs, villages and cities you visit ... you'll find lots of interesting information.

Thanks so much for coming by ... January has closed off and February beckons us on ... appreciate all your comments - cheers Hilary

SavingsInSeconds said...

Amazing! Since I've never traveled outside of the country (at least, not that I can remember -- I was a baby) I'm completely in awe of your post and photos.
Dianna

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Dianna - thanks for coming by ... and I'm so delighted you enjoyed the post with its photos .. cheers Hilary