Tuesday, 31 January 2017

Ferroequinology … a new trading route …



Trains … ferroequinology the study of those rolling stock wagons or in old parlance ‘iron horses’ … raised its head in two ways … the incredible new silk route across China, Russia, Europe which now has a terminus in east London, at the Barking depot, Essex.

Stephenson's Rocket


The Trans-Siberian railway forms a key component of the Silk Road Economic Belt with its incredible coverage:


  • 70% of the world’s population
  • 75% of its energy resources
  • 70% of the Gross Domestic Product in the world


Then there are these inland harbours … but methinks this post will be about the ferroequinology aspect and one inland port that of Duisburg, Germany.


An example of an earlier 'old' silk route

I was staggered to read that a Chinese cargo train which had set out from Yiwu, famous as a commodities centre, south-west of Shanghai, arrived in London 16 - 18 days later, in about half the usual ship consignment time, and at half the estimated airfreight cost.


The average container ship can hold up to 19,224 twenty-foot containers on a large cargo vessel … but this train with 200 containers cannot match up, yet saves time, tends not to have delays, and costs less.   34 of the wagons, with 68 containers, were destined for London.


Spanish Tapas - ham, chorizo, wine, cheeses,
olive oil dip ... 

The wagons from different countries will not go back empty … from Madrid will go hams, chorizo, olive oil, cheeses, wine and from Germany and Belgium beer … Poland has speciality foods too …




Container Ship sparkling in the sun in a
shipping lane in the English Channel



Ships will still be used for larger and heavier goods – so the high seas will still be traversed.  ‘Our’ train brought in socks, garments, bags and suitcases, or similar items – return products will be of local origin … 






There seem to be various routes being tested … this train travelled 7,500 miles, through seven countries, had to unload and re-load where the varying rail gauges on Russian lines didn’t match. 

Some basic facts provided by This Is Money


Different rail gauges used across the world:
the blue is the standard gauge

The UK’s containers were unloaded in Duisburg, before being transferred for the last leg under the Channel and into Barking, East London.  Duisburg has reinvented itself as an inland container port … the world’s largest inland harbour … see link to Railway Gazette



This is an American train - but they are
experimenting with trains 3.5 miles long?!

… and provides the specially approved cargo container wagons,  for the last part of the rail trip via the Channel Tunnel … so we can get our consignment of household products into the UK.





Sculpture of a ferro equine:
c/o Thoro Edge Equine




A silk, or sock, route reinvented … I certainly hadn’t thought we would be importing goods via a rail network – we are an island after all – or so I believed! …





Extraordinary world we live in … there are 39 routes linking 16 Chinese cities to 12 European ones, including Hamburg and Madrid, as well as London.


J M W Turner's 1844 painting:
"Rain, Steam and Speed"
Ferroequinology is a winner … just the thought of this journey bemuses me … what would JMW Turner, the artist with his “Rain, Steam and Speed – the Great Western Railway”(1844), have thought of it … and it was only 8 years ago that container ships were being moth-balled in deep water ports due to the global economic crisis …






This print shows the Rainhill Trials of 1829

Here’s to the new silk route … and these silk routes will be spun and spun … which could lead to a number of global shortages … if most of our commodities are off to China … as we recently had with chocolate … it is an interesting world at the moment.

A ferroequinologist's delight ... trains from here to China!

Please see my earlier post on the Get Up and Push Railroad - where the term ferroequinology came to light ... 


The return trip back to China ... set off 10 April 2017 ... see here: Freight train begins first journey from UK to China - it'll be there in about 2 weeks ...

Hilary Melton-Butcher 
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

59 comments:

Mason Canyon said...

An intriguing post, Hilary. Trains are such a fascination to me. As our lives get more advanced each day, I think it's good that we still rely on trains (as long as they don't get to high tech).

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

A three and a half mile lone train? Dear Lord, one would sit at the track forever waiting for that one to pass.
The railroad was what bridged the gap between the coasts here in America.

bazza said...

Fabulous Hilary! Barking is only a few miles from where I live but I never knew about this (I must watch the News more often). I think the origin of the ancient silk road goes back to Roman times.
I had noticed that things I ordered from China on eBay were often post-marked 'Belgium' so I presumed they were container-shipped to Europe for posting; maybe they will come direct to the UK now - I could collect them from Barking!
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s fabulous Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Out on the prairie said...

Many items we have now that were treasures to discover at both ends.our trains were not kept up as well and have suffered.

Deniz Bevan said...

Love that Turner painting.
I'm fascinated by that cargo train too! Funny to think that it's taken 200 of years of rail for that to finally happen. The use of different guages are really intriguing too -- the fact that everything has to be offloaded and reloaded at a massive port in Kazakhstan, just because the rails are a few centimeters wider apart!

Jo said...

I thought "what is she talking about, the Silk Road was ages ago". Just shows you. What a fabulous idea. Although, like Alex, the thought of a 3 mile train at a road crossing horrifies me. We have humungous trains here now anyway and if you do meet one at a crossing it is a very looooong wait.

I would like to raid the train when it is carrying the chorizo, hams and all the other goodies you wrote about. Yum.

I guess if it turns out to be worth it they will re-lay tracks somewhere. Or build a train that can use the different sizes.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Mason - trains are fascinating ... I was watching Michael Portillo and his Great American train journey last night - lots of old locomotives were shown in it ... he was in the Kansas/ Colorado area ... great plains and trains.

The Railway Gazette here has some very salient information re the development of this line ...

@ Alex - yes ... Michael Portillo pointed that out in his Great American train journey ... they needed extra engines etc .. but gather it is possible now - whereas it wasn't a few years back (technically something's got cleverer!). Yes - the bridging of the whole of the States ... as I mentioned above to Mason ...

@ Bazza - well I didn't expect this comment ... I saw this in some articles I get via Feedly, or via The Week, or the radio/tv probably too ...

The Silk Road goes back to the Han Dynasty - 200 BC or so ... I expect the Greeks and Romans realised the benefits to be accrued by tapping into it ...

How interesting that your eBay items might be post-marked Belgium - one of the earlier inland terminals ... who knows you might be able to go down the road and pick up your orders! I'll be interested to hear ...

@ Steve - I gather some of the trains are being modernised or updated to tap into the tourist trade ... and most of you use your cars ... easier I guess. We don't talk about trains down here - our Southern Rail Service is appalling ... I'm so glad I don't go to work that way ...

@ Denise - yes the Turner painting is so evocative of his times ... but what foresight to see into the future ...

The north American trains are soooo long - now they're getting longer!

The containers are moved across onto new bogies (Chassis - wheel bases) ... nothing needs to be unpacked ... but who knows whether they will change the track or lay a new one/new ones ... the Gazette I link to has some interesting information on the logistics of this aspect. High tech logistics knowledge is being put to good use ...

@ Jo - I might well be going crazy - but couldn't resist this. I can imagine your waits can be looooong... I've experienced one or two. Remember to choose the correct container! - otherwise you might find just beer?!

Logistically they'll work something out for easing the passage of each of the container chassis ....

Thanks everyone - great comments ... the Railway Gazette article has some amazing information in it ... if you get a chance: give it a read ... cheers Hilary

DMS said...

What an interesting post! So much history to think about! I enjoyed learning about the past and it is important to think about how goods move today. Things keep chugging along. ;)

Hope you have a wonderful week!
~Jess

Janie Junebug said...

As usual, I learn so much from you. I have a new word in my vocabulary, which always makes me happy.

Love,
Janie

Sue McPeak said...

What a fascinating history lesson. Really enjoyed reading about a Ferroequinologist's delight from there to China! Such a different view than as Alex commented...America's coast to coast connection. Thanks for stopping by CollectInTexas Gal today. I've missed you. Looking forward to seeing what changes are coming for AtoZ. I may be out of the loop, but we will see.

Liz A. said...

Everything old is new again...

Denise Covey said...

Hi Hilary! Trains are fascinating, aren't they? Nothing like taking the occasional tourist steam train ride to see how it used to be, to partake of history first hand. I was as amazed as you when I read your account of the Chinese train from Yiwu. Who would have thunk?? And the amount of goods which criss cross nations on trains?

In Oz, our train system is so last century. We've devoted ourselves to cars, tunnels and high-speed highways. The fondest hope of many of us is a high-speed train between the capital cities along the east coast--Brisbane, Sydney, Canberra, Melbourne, seeing our distances are so vast, but hey, a politician only sits for 3 years and could care less, unfortunately. It would be such a boost to tourism and travel, so go figure.

Have a great week. Stay dry!

Denise :-)

D.G. Hudson said...

I'm a big fan of trains as hubs was a train engineer and was a career railway man. We would even take side trips to see small railways when we traveled about. We have also taken VIA rail from BC to Alberta to meet family once, and got to see the northern version of the Rockies before the Rocky Mountaineer route was established. As always, Hilary, you choose an interesting subject.

Botanist said...

Our kids got their first sight of proper trains when we visited the BC mainland in 2015. We saw many of them on our travels and always counted the cars and tried to estimate the length. Best guess was somewhere between 1 and 2 miles in many cases.

D.G. Hudson said...

Almost forgot, we also took the steam train, the Royal Hudson along the western coast here a few times when relatives visited. I think it's been de-commissioned now, but not sure why. It makes me think of Murder on the Orient Express which I just re-read.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Jess – I was fascinated to read about this ‘new’ rail routing system … but as you say things keep chugging along and goods get delivered.

@ Janie – many thanks … you might enjoy ‘Gricer’ too – found in my linked post for ferroequinology …

Sue – I have to say I really hadn’t realised goods were starting to be shipped overland again … different routes, different logistics … same objective – keeping us all supplied with different goodies …

@ Liz – yes it’s strange isn’t it … life is always reinventing itself …

@ Denise – yes, saving the heritage lines makes so much sense and really opens our eyes to the old ways. They are fascinating to ride …

I was just staggered at the achievement of opening up ‘earlier’ silk routes and the ways they are thinking forward … a whole world of new consumers lies in wait in China. Certainly even though this island is tiny, the goods yards are being upgraded to cut down on wait times and delays for the longer goods trains.

Like you we got rid of our train system via the Beeching cuts after the war – now the rails aren’t there any more … some have housing, some are cycle routes, no doubt some are link roads. I can image that a train between your east coast cities would make sense. The political will is another story … and that thought of the 3 year term doesn’t give us long-term processes does it …

@ DG – I remember you said he was a career railway man … and can imagine you’d take the smaller routes at times … much like I swing off into the lanes if I can when I’m in a car.

The route across the Rockies is extraordinary … now or then … and how lucky you took the Royal Hudson down the western coast … what a lovely journey to make – I suppose tourists are now on cruises up to Alaska and back …

That Christie story is a fascinating one … she’s clever at plot weaving …

@ Ian – I bet the kids were bemused by the trains themselves, let alone the length of them and you’re right about the length of the trains … they’re only recently trialling longer trains in the States – not here I hasten to add!

Thanks so much for coming by and commenting … it’s interesting the way the world is turning and bringing trains back into the mix … we transport so much and want to move goods around all the time … cheers to you all - Hilary

Rhonda Albom said...

Very interesting. A good idea from years ago keeps on going (updated for the times).

Julie Flanders said...

I love trains and this is fascinating. And thanks to this and now catching up on your previous post I've learned a new word! Ferroequinology! What a great word. :D

Bish Denham said...

Just goes to show how small the world has become, how interconnected we are, and that every country should be building/improving it's rail lines.

It's something I'd definitely like to see more of here in the US, and for travel too.

What a great post!

Arlee Bird said...

You always manage to inform me of something I'd never heard about before. "Iron Horse" is a term that I've been well familiar with, but that more scientific sounding word is a new one on me. That's a lot of train coverage to which you refer. So great that we can move product and people in such massive and efficient ways.

Arlee Bird
Tossing It Out

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

I have a nerdy addiction to words, and you just taught me a new one! Ferroequinology is a SUPER words. Thanks!

As for those 3 1/2 mile long trains, OY! It already seems like the ones I encounter at the railroad crossing when I'm on the way home from the grocery store are that long... especially when I have ice cream melting in my trunk.

Cheers!

Jacqui Murray said...

How products like silk got across the ancient world is amazing. I recently had to research salt and the part it played in ancient civilizations. Another amazing story!

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

We visited the train museum while I was there. Fabulous. I actually sat inside Queen Victoria's car. Very kewl.

Chrys Fey said...

Wow. I would hate to have to wait for that train to pass! I had no idea there were so many routes linking China to Europe.

cleemckenzie said...

I love all things about trains, and traveling across so many countries would be fascinating. I'm trying to imagine how much work it took to reload those trains with each gauge change. Great way to keep people employed, though. Turner's paintings always make me stop and stare.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

Railroads are amazing links around the world. In the USA they're expensive to travel on but so much more reliable and relaxing than any other way.

Fil said...

I always fancied going on one of those long train journeys, but the idea of them being a cargo trail is brilliant - would never have guessed it ... Thanks for the great information Hilary.

N. R. Williams said...

Hi Hilary
Chirizo is popular in Mexican cooking. I don't personally like it.

How do trains arrive? Through the underground, or should I say, under water channel which I imagined was only for passengers?

I also imagine that there must have been a lot of difficulty transporting anything along that route during the Soviet era.

I've found a few mistakes in my book which I corrected for the re-release. Waiting on money, as usual.
Nancy

Joanne said...

quite a post. The concept of logistics is amazing and fascinating. To think of the variety and quantity of goods being moved hundreds of thousands of miles throughout the globe is mind boggling. It's worthy of such a special term. Thanks for your research and report.

Murees Dupé said...

A wonderful post, Hilary. I do admire the reliability of trains. Unfortunately, our public transport system here can do with vast improvement. But a fascinating post. Chorizo . . . Yummy!

Theresa Milstein said...

I can't believe there could be trains that long! Though I have seen freight trains in the western part of the United States that seemed to have gone on forever. I've always loved trains. As a kid, I heard them off in the distance. When I visit now, I love to hear them again.

Crystal Collier said...

Whenever I have to stop for a train, I'm frustrated but they certain have been a handy means for transportation--especially in the past. I imagine they are much cheaper than commercial semi services too.

Elsie Amata said...

I grew up in NY where trains are super fast. Than I lived in Louisiana where they are so very slow. The crossing in NY, maybe two, three minutes. LA, ten, fifteen minutes...unless they started to back-up. Then who knows!

Victoria Marie Lees said...

No kidding, Hilary. You have the most interesting information here on your blog. Again, I love all the photos. Trains were definitely the way to get around, be it passenger or freight. I like taking the high-speedline into the city [Philadelphia]. Much better than driving and trying to find a parking space. All the best to you!

A Cuban In London said...

Love this post. You have given me so much historical and cultural information here. Just the other day I was at the National Gallery and stood in front of Turner's canvas in which he has a steam engine coming at speed. Mind you, I still can't see the hare in the picture. :-)

Greetings from London.

Patsy said...

That's a long word for 'anorak' ;-)

Shannon Lawrence said...

Railroads have made such an impact around the world. I'd be curious to see the impact of railroads on countries outside of Europe and the U.S.

Lynda R Young said...

I have a special love for the old steam trains. So gorgeous.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Rhonda – yes a good idea being reinvented for today’s age.

@ Julie – that’s great that both posts caught your imagination …

@ Bish – I know the world really is getting smaller … if only equality across it was better – still things are improving. They seem to be upgrading your rail lines and opening more tourist type rail routes …

@ Lee – good to see you … the Iron Horse is the obvious name isn’t it … but I simply couldn’t resist Ferroequinology especially in this instance.

@ Susan – glad you enjoyed my new word! Oh yes the loooong trains you have are looong!! I guess a better cool bag to bring the ice-cream home, or simply not buy it?! Or to check the timetable?!

@ Jacqui – it’s fascinating to think of the trading that went on millennia ago, then to relate the products to today’s … some got forgotten, yet then were found. Salt is an amazing product – a tax too … I’ve mentioned it in a post … Gathering taxes by a hedge – one of my earliest posts!

@ Joylene – they’ve done the National Rail Museum up recently or are in the process of modernising … it’d be an interesting museum to take in – ‘very kewl’ to sit inside Queen Vic’s carriage … I’ve never visited – I need to sometime.

@ Chrys – oh yes waiting for a train like that to pass would be something of a nuisance … nor had I realised the train linkage – China to Europe and the UK … til I wrote the post …

@ Lee – The Railway Gazette goes into some of the detail re the bogie changing and they are looking at the logistics to speed the process up … it’s only at the Russian borders – so twice.

Turner’s painting is extraordinary … and after I wrote up quite a detailed post on his art after the film came out, and with the exhibition at the Tate … I really like going back to review my posts on his art and those times early 1800s.

@ Susan – railways were a great step forward from canals, rivers and the seas … ours are expensive here, but then our infrastructure is old … but with a good service they can be invaluable.

@ Fil – I just had not realised the thought of bringing goods in overland via Asia was being considered, but if it saves so much time – why not. Glad you enjoyed reading about this new route.

@ Nancy – I’m sure chorizo is popular in Mexico – most foods have ‘travelled’ … and thus are cooked all around the world.

Trains arrive overland … and then the 34 double containers due for us are put on special trains for the freight lines under the Channel via the tunnel. These trans-Asia routes have only been going for a few years …

Glad you’ve updated your book – well done ..

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Joanne – the term was just a fun name – but I’ve enjoyed learning more about the start of trains, or in this case the new routes. We just don’t realise what is going on around us … glad you enjoyed the information …

@ Murees – yes trains run to timetables are brilliant and here we don’t have too bad a system – though at times it breaks down. Love chorizo … so agree with you there!

@ Theresa – they’re your trains … but you’ll find them in the west – can’t remember where they were being tried out. We had a little steam train that went along the Cornish coast branch line St Erth to St Ives … it puffed its way along … and hooted under the bridges or tunnels … memories.

@ Crystal – yes we still have level crossings here in various places … so need to wait – ours are somewhat quicker though. Goods trains are designed for goods and that makes the logistics easier, except for crossing roads!

@ Elsie – I know I was talking to a Swiss student, who was born in Turkey, about our bus service – and reminded him that our infrastructure is the oldest in the world and our towns aren’t our cities. So I’d expect NY to be fast and Louisiana to be slow … but that’s the way of life.

@ Victoria – the high speed into Philadelphia must make a difference … I only go into London via the train … but no fast service. So glad you enjoyed the post with the accompanying photos … brings the piece to life – at least I think it does!

@ ACIL – thanks so much ... I like giving that extra bit of detail, and decided Turner needed a mention. “Rain Steam and Speed” is Turner’s iconic painting … but that hare is illusive – must be there though!

@ Patsy – yes I could have shortened the post to ‘anorak’ couldn’t I … but not so much fun?!

@ Shannon – there’s a time line of railway history … that is probably the easiest way to give you an overview. I could write about it … but for now I’ll leave you with the link …

Wikipedia – Time line of railway history …
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_transport

@ Lynda - glad you enjoyed this post ... somewhat different from your recent flights and cruise!

Thanks so much for coming by … fascinating comments and thoughts you’ve all added … here’s to railways – I hope they can sort our Southern Railway out … we’ve been having strikes now for nearly a year … very disturbing and distressing for so many. Cheers to you all - Hilary

Nilanjana Bose said...

The train journey to beat all train journeys - epic! Ferroquinology is my word for the day :) Maybe someday we'll have passenger train options - that would be so much more interesting. Boarding at Yiwu and arriving at Barking a fortnight later, oh yesss please!

L. Diane Wolfe said...

It's hard to imagine a train track 7500 miles long.

Angela Barton said...

Fascinating post, Hilary. There's something so romantic about train travel and I love to watch documentaries about travel. I've fallen for that painting by Turner. I must look for a print of it.

diedre Knight said...

I've yet to visit one of your posts and not be enriched! I love trains and everything about them. There is something so assuring in the steady rock of the cars and clack of metal to metal; a massive iron artery spreading life to distant places. I grew up with the sounds of trains nearby, the whistle was as much a comfort as a strident sunrise.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nila - well one of the train journeys to beat all train journeys - seems there are a number of destinations. Glad you enjoyed 'Ferroequinology'. I'm not sure I fancy the idea of 14 days on a train ... but I'm sure it will be happening at some stage ...

@ Diane - the track must be straightish and as you say loooong ...

@ Angela - I watch a few of the train documentaries ... I've been watching Michael Portillo's ones across America. The Turner painting is just beautiful isn't it ... so visionary: hope you find the print.


@ Diedre Knight - many thanks ... trains can be romantic in various ways ... as you mention that spurt out into the unknown - but now with plush rail cars and glass roofs. We had the little puffing train when we were in Cornwall, now occasionally I hear the trains pull out of the terminus .. and as you say there's comfort in 'the noises of norm' ...

Cheers and thanks so much for visiting - all the best Hilary

Susan Scott said...

Altogether fascinating Hilary - and I loved the photos - Turner's one so beautiful. American trains over 3 miles long? Extra-ordinary! We had a good and functional rail system here in SA, which has gone a bit to pot but there is a plot afoot to get it back on track - pun intended - to save huge trucks using the roads. I'm reminded of Agatha Christie's 'Murder on the Orient Express' -

Gattina said...

I didn't know about Duisburg, but on a tour through Turkey we went on a part of the silk road. What a long way to do from China to Europe !

Keith's Ramblings said...

Only yesterday I had dinner with a friend who has just travelled on the Trans-Siberean from Beijing to Moscow.Lucky her! I too love train travel. From the chaotic yet efficient trains I use often in India, to the Marrakech Express and the bullet trains in China. I travelled on Southern yesterday. Words fail me! But I've never heard the word ferroequinology! Remind me to show you my pictures sometime.

Nick Wilford said...

Funny to think of a silk route existing nowadays when it's something we associate so strongly with the medieval era. The logistics behind these journeys is mind-boggling - I've seen the Channel Tunnel part, with the wagons boarding the train, and it is pretty impressive.

Empty Nest Insider said...

Hi Hilary! Growing up I wish I had a history teacher who had even half of your enthusiasm! It would be interesting to go on a scenic train trip, but I'd prefer not to travel on a 3.5 mile long train. I will have to think of a way to work the word ferroequinology into a conversation!

Julie

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan - yes I think western countries are seeing the advantages of the rail system and having the need to upgrade it (somehow). I've only used the Blue Train in SA ... I'm sure it'd make sense to get that 'plot' on track ... the infrastructure needs upgrading to get cars off the roads too. Murder on the Orient Express - was such a good Christie book and film ...

@ Gattina - I'd no idea where Duisburg was - but the article is really interesting. So many silk roads or tracks through the eastern terrains - again interesting to note the various 'roads'. Yes miles - but if it's quicker and cheaper ... makes sense. Also if they can sort the bogie aspect out and run straight through that'd make it much quicker ...

@ Keith - how extraordinary - yes I wonder what the journey Beijing to Moscow was like ... well you can tell me when we meet and show me your photos - you've done way more travelling than I have: India, Marrakech, bullet trains ... oh don't talk about Southern - I've simply stopped using it - dreadful, just so glad I don't need to use it (our railway company for getting from the south coast into Victoria, London). I only found 'ferroequinology' last year when I posted the word 'gricer' for a train-spotter ... thus found another use for it today.

@ Nick - yes, it is extraordinary to think that the silk routes (trade routes) started about 2,200 years ago going from China, across Asia ... and then the time of settlement when the Medieval workers from Belgium and Flanders fled to the UK to start silk production here. I hadn't realised there were different wagons for the Channel Tunnel link -but makes sense for security in this day and age - I'm sure it's impressive ...

@ Julie - delighted I amuse and 'educate' you about facets of history. The scenic trains are a delight .. and we've some wonderful short ones here ... but that/those 3.5 mile one/s is/are for freight. Good luck with your conversational show stopper!

Thanks everyone - it's fascinating to read how trains interest you all and remind you of aspects of life ... cheers Hilary

Suzanne Furness said...

I've often thought the rail system could be put to better use for transporting goods, seems like maybe it is already. It is good to read about. Now, if we could somehow make passenger trains more realistically priced I would be delighted. Trying to book a train to London from Cornwall can be mind boggling and expensive!
Thanks for the interesting post, Hilary.

Nicola said...

I love travelling by train through Europe. So many beautiful places to see when going from A to B. An interesting post Hilary. Thank you for sharing. Wishing you a lovely week.

Robert Bennett said...

I'd never really thought of these as having their own study, but that makes sense. Everytime I'd seen them I'd always just considered them proto-trains and left them at that.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Suzanne - well it seems like they're trying to open the markets up to an extended Asian-European railway. Passenger trains are expensive - one price would help ... and probably be cheaper to operate ... or two - in rush hour, and out of rush hour. I hope my thoughts about a range of tickets might be the answer ... some people are doing that. If we could remove our railways in the SE and start again - that'd be helpful - Southern is the pits!

@ Nicola - if the trains and routes fit in with my needs then I'm happy - and some routes are just wonderful - as you say A to B. The European routes offer much ... our rolling stock and infrastructure is just that much older and we have less space ... but ....

@ Robert - I think I've slightly misused the word - but I enjoy it! I don't think these are proto-trains ... they're the full Monti ... ie actual full steam ahead trains ...

Thanks for commenting and adding in your notes - always good to read - cheers Hilary

Christine Rains said...

Wow. That is really interesting. I've learned a new word today with ferroequinology! Have a lovely week.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Christine ... - it certainly was fun to write up ... and these iron horses have only been around 200 years ... seems extraordinary ... cheers Hilary

Lynn said...

That word is a mouthful! So interesting and sometimes I think the train that passes by when I'm trying to get home seems that long. :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Lynn - I bet you wait for ages sometimes ... they're trying to bridge our level crossings ... and it's slowly happening. I know your trains go on for ever ... it's bad enough waiting here sometimes ... we have places with crossings in the villages, or suburbs ... cheers Hilary