Thursday, 15 June 2017

Bran Tub # 12: Myotonic Goats ...



Fainting Goats to you and me … well Rhonda of Albom Adventures alerted me to them in her comment on my F for Feral Goat post I wrote as part of my series “Aspects of British County Rare Breeds”.  I couldn’t not find out more could I? … so you get a bran tub post!

Kid goat that has fainted


To me … it seems an extraordinary condition … the goat’s muscles freeze for roughly 3 seconds when the goat feels panic.




Young goats tend to ‘keel’ over, while older goats have learnt to spread their legs or lean against something when startled …


Poor goats ... stiff legged ... 


… this can leave them for a while with an awkward, stiff-legged shuffle - giving us humans another way of describing them … ‘wooden-legged goats’ … or no doubt many a description!




But symptoms can affect humans too – so often there’s that  interlink - but I’ll leave you to investigate ‘myotonia’ … it’s a symptom of a small handful of certain neuromuscular disorders characterised by delayed relaxation (prolonged contraction) of the skeletal muscles after voluntary contraction or electrical stimulation.

Tennessee - Lewisburg, home of the fainting goats is near the
Alabama border: about where the 'C' of Chattanooga is shown

Back to fainting goats (wooden-legged goats) … they are classified as a meat goat as opposed to a dairy goat, but can be raised for chevon (goat meat). 


Referencing the British Rare Breeds Survival Trust as my April posts highlighted – this rare breed falls under The Livestock Breed Conservancy of America (ALBC) – and thus is being protected.




Marshall County Courthouse
in Lewisburg

Tennessee seems to be the centre for these goats, where in October there is an annual “Goats, Music and More Festival” honouring the fainting goats …


Marshall County puts on this festival, centred on goats, but has activities including music, arts, festival games, crafts, food (of course!), and children’s activities … sounds like fun.



The logo c/o the Festival site
There’s a three legged goat triathlon apparently … and a goats gallop of 5 k … I presume both of these are human based!


How do I finish a post like this … ah! a link to South Africa … I see on the Goats Music and More site that the judges are described as Boer judges – after my time in SA … that is where ‘the boer’ is an Afrikaans farmer.




Matt Gillan - with his winning dish for Great British
Menu in 2015.  He told the important story of the goat
to the islanders of St Helena (see my post)

Yet the introduced Boer goat has been discovered as an excellent crossbreed stock for the fainting one, a meat goat which was imported from South Africa … the fainting gene is recessive, therefore it is usually not expressed in crossbred animals.





Jerk Goat Kebabs with dried mango
So the fainting goat can be conserved as a breed … yet the traits of the meat goat can be kept as a meat goat, when it has been crossed with the Boer goat … and can thus give us goat meat …



Albom Adventures – Rhonda’s blog highlighting ‘The Essence of Travel Through Photography’ …

Wikipedia’s – Fainting Goat …. and Myotonia sites …

Marshall County’s link to the Goats, Music and More Festival in Tennessee …

That's it for fainting goats - can't quite get over this Bran Tub find!

Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

63 comments:

Sylvia van Bruggen said...

I love this post so much. I love goats too even though they are so destructive at times :) I love that there is even a festival honoring them :)

Have a great day!

Jz said...

They're a fascinating beast, aren't they, these goats?
I first heard about then when Stuff You Should Know did a podcast on that very topic.
Can't say I'm a huge goat meat fan, however. (Perhaps I simply haven't had it prepared well - pass that plate, Mr. Gillan!

Jz said...

(and please close that parenthesis while you're at it!)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Sylvia ... it was fun to write up - interesting from the Myotonia point of view, as well as for the goat beastie aspect ... love them, like you - they have their uses ...

@ Jz - my abilities re adding in a parenthesis close off is beyond me ... but I will set out your thought here - i.e. re-set it out!:

Jz's end sentence: "(Perhaps I simply haven't it prepared well) - pass that plate, Mr Gillan!" - that do?!

Oh right ... I hadn't heard of that podcast site ... but am sure articles have appeared on these extraordinary creatures ... I just was amused to know about them.

Goat is good - I don't often have it .. but when it's on offer I'll almost certainly select it ... tasty ... and yes Mr Gillan could happily prepare me his goat dish - he was a brilliant chef.

Cheers to the two of you ... goats be goats ... sturdy, temperamental, yet delicious to eat ... unless they're leg-side up! Take care - Hilary

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

The show Dirty Jobs also featured the goats once. Rather funny to watch.

Murees Dupé said...

I think goats are very cute. I've never been able to eat goat meat. For me personally, it's just a no-no. I saw a video of the fainting goats once. I felt kind of sorry for them. Again, great post, Hilary. Hope you are doing great.

C.D. Gallant-King said...

Goats are so weird. Not just the fainting, but the climbing and the jumping... Have you ever seen those pictures of trees full of goats?

I don't think I've ever eaten goat meat, but goat cheese is very good.

A Heron's View said...

I used to keep goats several years ago both Nannies and Billy goats,
very intelligent animals and each of them had different temperaments as were their dietary preferences too.
One of my milkers was very extraordinary in that she would only give down her milk if she was stood next to a window, I used to milk them by hand.
I enjoy goats milk, cheese and butter but utterly dislike goats meat so much so that I am unable swallow any at all.

Inger said...

I have heard about these goats, but, as always, you gave us more interesting details about what's going on with them.

Rhodesia said...

Wow what an interesting post. I have heard of fainting goats but it did not mean much to me so now I am a whole lot wiser. Love the South African touch as well, great bit of information. Have a good weekend Diane

Janie Junebug said...

Poor little goats, passing out! I've never eaten goat and have never seen it served anywhere.

Love,
Janie

DMS said...

I have never heard of fainting goats! How fascinating that as they get older they learn to take a stance that will help them when they are startled so they don't fall over. Wow! Thanks for sharing. :)
~Jess

A Cuban In London said...

Sorry, I can't help seeing goats and thinking of curry goat. :-)

Now, that freezing response... That's amazing.

Greetings from London.

Nick Wilford said...

I didn't realise "fainting goat" was actually the name of the breed at first. I think they need to be looked after, and definitely deserve their own festival!

Joanne said...

From TN to South Africa, you travel the globe. Quite fascinating and weird. It is funny- I think I have dreams some nights where I am frozen. Not aware of fainting but fainting goat petrified symptoms. Oh my!

Liz A. said...

There's an author who I follow on Twitter that has a slight obsession with goats. I bet she'd enjoy this post.

Becca said...

I never knew so much about goats before! I always used to think I wanted one because they are so cute!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Alex – I’m sure some of our tv shows have repeated your Dirty Jobs tv program here … and I’m sure they’re funny to watch … not something I see …

@ Murees – goats always look delightful don’t they; I don’t eat goat often, but it is very tasty: but understand it is a rich meat and some people can’t take it. Oh I’m glad you’ve seen the goats actually fainting … and yes ‘poor things’ … not so good falling over. All well here – thank you …

@ CD – they’re incredibly nimble animals aren’t they – seeing them on rock faces is always amazing. In Portugal I saw goats in trees, and they now have goat towers for them – I posted about them – fun to see. Goats’ cheese I often eat … and the meat occasionally …

@ Mel – quite a lot of people now keep the odd goat … and have interesting experiences with them. I’m sure they’re very quirky – what a sensible milker to insist on having a window to look out of! I don’t think I’ve ever had goat’s milk or butter, but their cheese I love. It’s interesting how goat and occasionally sheep meat can repel people when cooked …

@ Inger – glad you enjoyed the post – they make me laugh, so the fainting variety bemused me …

@ Diane – well thank you for tying the post up for me … seeing the South African connection I had to put it in …

@ Janie – poor goats as you say – an unfortunate condition. Goat isn’t often served … except in countries where it’s traditional – Greece, Jamaica …

@ Jess – nor had I heard of fainting goats – so you get to know too … but they’re interesting to know about – and I was interested in the myotonia syndrome …

@ Mario – no worries … I see goats half way up the Rockies, or trees … or some really good cheese! Bemused me – the freezing response …

@ Nick – yes it is extraordinary isn’t it … the breed is protected, though they can be cross bred and thus give value by not wasting the goats that aren’t required for protection status.

@ Joanne – it just seemed a great subject to write about … and then the South African connection was too good to miss out on mentioning! I wonder if your dream is partly real – could be … better make Ray aware of that possibility … ?!

@ Liz – perhaps she already knows about these goats – they just amuse me … it’ll be good to know if she sees the post …

@ Becca – they do look cute don’t they … but I just added a little to the history of this particular breed …

Cheers to you all – at the beginning I thought everyone was going to know about these fainting goats … but thankfully not – amusing story for the grand-kids, or kids over the holidays – suddenly go into goat-fainting mode … lots of laughter forthcoming?! Happy weekends - Hilary

Annalisa Crawford said...

How strange that just one type of goat is afflicted (if I understand correctly). I love the idea of older goats preparing themselves to be startled - surely, if you're prepared, you can't be startled?

L. Diane Wolfe said...

I'd love to go to that festival and see the goats fall over.

Mike Goad said...

I've never had goat meat, that I know of. There are not many raised in this area, though a niece and her husband do raise and sell a few on their farm in northwest Arkansas, about a 3 hour drive from here.

Jo said...

What a very odd story Hilary. What a very odd reaction to fear or startlement. I have only ever eaten goat meat once at a Greek restaurant here some 28 years ago, they are long gone now unfortunately. The meat tasted very much like lamb (no not chicken LOL) and we both enjoyed it. The restaurant's chef used to work for Onassis' brother in law apparently. Well qualified.

bazza said...

Goats seem to be non-agressive docile animals (mostly) rather like sheep. When my daughter was six years-old, we were driving through the country when she saw some lambs gambolling in a field, "Daddy, when lambs die we eat them don't we?". I swallowed something hard and jagged, and couldn't answer her!
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s Dilatory Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Andrea Ostapovitch said...

Love the fainting goats so much. And I love that there is a festival in their honour, although I'm quite sure it's more for our entertainment than their honor. But as long as it helps support the breed, then I'm in favour. I've never had goat meat, at least not that I'm aware of., but of it is true that it tastes like lamb, then I will stay clear.
Andrea

Arlee Bird said...

All the years I lived in Tennessee I don't ever recall hearing about that goat festival in Lewisburg. Goat meat is not a regular fixture of my diet and my wife abhors the thought of it, but I have eaten it on a few occasions. As to liking it I really can't recall. The last time I had a dish that contained goat meat was at least ten years ago at an Ecuadorian restaurant. My wife said not to get it (she's Ecuadorian) while the waiter highly recommended it. I probably should have listened to my wife and tried something different as what I got was not my favorite thing in the world.

Arlee Bird
Tossing It Out

Michael Di Gesu said...

Hi, Hilary,

Poor goats, tipping and being eaten.... They are such cute and mischievous animals... Bet it's a fun festival!

Hope all is well and I am looking forward to reading your Bridges post!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Annalisa – I believe that’s right … it’s a genetic condition; I would think that the older goats are used to the affliction happening and thus ‘automatically’ adjust – my guess!

@ Diane – well it happens every year … perhaps you and hubby can go?! It’d be fascinating to hear about it …

@ Mike – it’s certainly not a common meat – though where the goat is part of the country’s agricultural system … as Jamaica and in Greece, then you’d find them. It’s certainly a strong meat – suitable for curries and good tasty stews … - perhaps your niece does eat her goats occasionally and you could try some if you visit …

@ Jo – it’s the condition that sets off the ‘startle’ – but I needed to know more: as you know I am curious! It’s a strong taste – but the Greeks are adept at their style of cooking and if there’s a Greek restaurant around … I’m there … love their food. Pity he’s gone … I wonder what working for an Onassis was like – not easy …

@ Bazza – they have a kick – do goats … and are rougher and tougher than sheep. Oh dear … I hope your daughter enjoys her lamb now … did you go into a whole life story of living and dying and eating to live … car journeys do produce some mighty funny stories …

@ Andrea – it’s just the idea of an animal fainting ‘at whim’ apparently … but like you the festival is a great idea isn’t it – entertains us, brings in some funds … and generally everyone has a good time. I was pleased to read about the cross-breeding with the South African type, so that there was value added – ie for the meat – and keeping the pure bred as pure. It’s stronger tasting than lamb, so you definitely won’t like it …

@ Lee – interesting that having lived in Tennessee you hadn’t heard about these goats or the festival in Lewisburg. Goat meat isn’t a regular in my household either, never has been, but I used to frequent a Greek restaurant for a few years in London and would have Goat there …

I expect your wife realised you wouldn’t like it – but you gave it a go … it’s an acquired taste – and worth knowing about – so well done.

@ Michael – thanks for coming by … the poor goats … but I’m sure the festival is fun … and they look cute – but I suspect the goats have a strong odour … as well as the mischievousness of them … and occasionally with a strong kick …

All well … and the Bridges post is a-waiting in the scheduling table!

Cheers to you all – thanks so much for visiting … and joining in the ‘myotonic goat chat’ – have good weekends … Hilary

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

One of our neighbors had a pair of goats when we lived in the house I showed in today's post. I, of course, loved them, but my mother, not so much. They kept invading our yard and eating all of her plants. Even so, we never considered them food, and I've never eaten goat to this day, although some of our markets carry it. Similar-tasting to lamb? (THAT, I love.)

Very interesting post, Hilary. I've heard of the fainting goats before, but have never seen them "in action." Maybe we'll have to check out that festival in Tennessee this October. :)

Have a super weekend.

Suzanne Furness said...

I do like goats, although wasn't so keen on the one that ate my hat when I was a child! Have not heard about the fainting goat condition before, most interesting to read about. All the best, Hilary.

Sharon Marie Himsl said...

Fainting goats?! I have never heard of this and you have photos to prove it too. I once froze in place after my son crashed headlong into a teeter totter. Hard as I tried, I couldn't move my legs for a few seconds. The strangest feeling.

Anabel Marsh said...

Fainting goats - amazing concept!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan - goats can be terrors ... always inquisitive and wanting to see what's on the other side ... but great company too - I gather. Equally if one has a lovely garden they will invade ... as deer, or rabbits ... Goat is a strong meat ... more like mutton (old lamb!) ...

I hope if you get to Tennessee you'll check this festival out for us and let us know ... you too have a great Father's day weekend with Smarticus and the family ...

@ Suzanne - I can believe they'd eat your hat ... they are survivors! I didn't know about the breed til Rhonda mentioned them and then of course I needed to post ...

@ Sharon - yes I did to some research via Wiki and Google ... amazing what one finds. Maybe at that moment with your son you suffered from this syndrome ... obviously not regularly - can quite see you'd be pleased about that ... when I had German Measles when I was in my 20s my body was very stiff and moving around was uncomfortable ... so I guess I know the feeling - though caused by something completely different ...

@ Anabel - it staggered me ... and so interesting ...

Cheers everyone - we are about to have a very hot weekend ... it's lovely as I have a cool breeze coming in off the sea! Happy Father's Day weekend ... and enjoy yourselves - Hilary

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

Fainting goats, hmm. You are remarkable at teaching me stuff I never knew before. And here I thought I knew about goats. I know many humans who faint under stress. Best to you, Hilary. I hope your faring well.

Keith's Ramblings said...

For some reason, Billy Goat Gruff entered my mind whilst reading this! now I am showing my age.

Click to visit Keith's Ramblings

diedre Knight said...

Now I know what that odd rack I found stashed in the crisper is! Hubs will be eating that alone, I'm sure. I couldn't possibly eat goat meat, especially from one who faints. I'm more compelled to protect the poor little thing.
A hummingbird found his way into the house one day and became so upset his heart stopped and he dropped to the floor. Hubs placed the tiny bird outside on a table while I cried and fretted about a proper burial box. Thankfully, before long the little guy returned to life and flew away. They should be protected too, I think ;-)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Joylene - this amused me ...and then the syndrome, which I found interesting too ... as at least one other commenter confirmed the syndrome ... perhaps the fainting too relates to this - I know I faint on occasions, but usually heat-stress related.

@ Keith - I didn't know Billy Goat Gruff was a folk tale from Norway - and I note there are lots of other links to the fairy tale - fun to know about ... and they got to their meadow to enjoy their time in the mountains ...

@ Diedre - well at least your husband enjoys his meat but he'll enjoy it alone. It looks like the breed is protected, while the 'spares' can live on in the cross-breed herd ... and yes they might be eaten then ...

Your comment about the hummingbird and birds in general dropping dead - usually after a crash into a window - could well fall into this syndrome as they recover afterwards ... well at least he wasn't buried alive ... and I'm glad he recovered and flew away ...

Thanks for your visit ... it's an interesting subject ... from a very hot south coast ... have a good rest of the weekend - Hilary

bookworm said...

Only about 90 km from Nashville, Tennessee. Too bad the timing is wrong for those traveling to Nashville for the total solar eclipse in August (it will be total in Nashville). I had learned about these goats long ago and had forgotten. It is a fascinating condition. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

sonia a. mascaro said...

Great post about the goats, Hilary! Amazing informations. Thanks!
Poor goats that had the muscles freezing for roughly 3 seconds when them feels panic.

Have a lovely Sunday!

Robert Bennett said...

I have absolutely no idea what to do with this information, but its awesome all the same. I knew about fainting goats, but had no idea the why behind it...much less what they're specifically used for or that there are goat fests.

Very cool. Thanks for sharing.

Susan Kane said...

Well, this is really unusual! Fainting goats. We are going to Switzerland to visit my daughter and family--which include a 6 mo old and 5 year old boys. Swiss like every kind of meat, and hold a weekly meat market. Will go searching for goat meat.

I have a favor to ask of you: could you check out my other site, Susan Kane, Writer. This is a collection of family members stories. This recent post, Facing Down Demons, is about my Grandfather Cardiff and surviving WW1. Any comments and such would be dearly appreciated.

Pamela Wright said...

I read about these goats years ago and thought it must be a joke, so investigated it and yes they were true. So fascinating to learn more about them.

Deborah Weber said...

What a lovely dose of goat wonderfulness. Poor fainters! I suppose it's a good thing though the tree goats of Morocco aren't fainters - that could be quite problematic.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Alana - so you could get to the festival ... bet there's a throng of people. The solar eclipse will be incredible for everyone to see ... though I wouldn't mind seeing the goats as well ...

@ Sonia - good to see you and I'm glad you could understand what is happening with the goats ... it's just 'fun' for us to think about - a challenge for the goat though ...

@ Robert - I wonder how much information is useful - but I had to laugh at these goats ... and then the back story - just interesting to find out about - one of those pieces of information to bemuse people(kids) ...

@ Susan - well the six year old grandson will laugh at this story ... and I'm sure take you all off to see some goats. Yes - I love those European markets ... and when you go to look for goat meat - see how they would recommend you cook it ... lucky you visiting Switzerland - enjoy.

I checked out your other site - I think I don't comment as one site is enough ... but it looks like you're doing a good job for your grandfather - harrowing times in those trenches.

@ Pamela - it is a strange and unsettling phenomenon isn't it ... adding those extra bits in thankfully adds to their story ...

@ Deborah - yes, thankfully the syndrome doesn't stretch to other goats ... and would defeat the goat's purpose if they all lived on the edge, but fainted too ...

Cheers to you all - we're having an incredible hot period at the moment ... but it's lovely having some summer weather ... enjoy the week ahead ... Hilary

Sue Bursztynski said...

Goodness, you discover some unusual beasties! I've never heard of these. I have also never eaten goat meat. Some cheese, I think. It's rather sad that an animal has that fainting gene and then gets eaten!

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

Goat cheese is wonderful and I eat it every week on salads, but I've never had goat meat.

Poor little fainting goats! That's real panic!

mocktail mommies said...

Goats faint??? That's something really new and interesting piece of information for me. Learnt a lot from your post. Thanks for sharing!
------------------------------------------------
Anagha From Team MocktailMommies
Rewind

Nilanjana Bose said...

Gosh you search out some really quirky animals :) had no idea that goats faint! Curried goat is a Sunday main meal staple in India where I come from.

J Lenni Dorner said...

I'm pretty sure the fainting goats were on an episode of Myth Busters. (Which, obviously, agreed that they exist.)

I'm fairly certain I've never eaten goat. I have had goat cheese and other such products.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

I have heard of myotonic in my role as a health teacher but I never heard of fainting goats. Very interesting. I've only ever had goat jerky as far as eating goat meat.

Mark Noce said...

Wow, I really did learn something new today. Never heard of this before, but it's pretty cool, and funny. :)

cleemckenzie said...

Now that is something to see. I'm imagining all these goats toppling over and me wondering which one to try and save, only to see them resurrect themselves and carry on. Thanks for the information before I had this experience!

klahanie said...

Hey Hilary,

Just thought I'd visit and practice my typing. Another enlightening post by your good self. I wont state something silly like you've goat to be kidding.

Cheers and try to stay cool in this oppressive weather.

Gary

Lenny Lee said...

fainting goats! how cool is that! i'd heard of them before but didn't know how it worked anatomically. i've watched a couple of videos on you tube. some are really funny. did you ever hear of the tree goats who climb trees and eat the fruit or foliage. there are some in Morocco. go to you tube and in the search type tree goats. i love goat meat especially curried goat and rice. the jerk kebabs with dried mango look delish. i love jerk chicken and pork. best jerk seasoning comes from Jamaica. yah man! ha ha.

dolorah said...

A fainting goat?! Well, as long as we can still eat the meat . . .

Hopefully there will be no trolls to interrupt the goat race.

Take car Hilary.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sue – they just amused me and I needed to write about them – fun posting. The breed is being protected, but the over production as always happens with animals … is then cross bred with the South African type goats … so it can be utilised, rather than killed at birth … as has been done …

@ Elizabeth- I know I love goats cheese and me too! I have it very often on my salad … I imagine it’s considered ‘normal’ for those kid goats …

@ Anagha – good to see you - and am glad you learnt something re the goats and the syndrome …

@ Nila – it’s when I read something that makes me look them/it up –then my thoughts are already on the way to ‘ can I blog it’ … this one you did get as a post. I’d noticed curried goat came up quite often in India …

@ JL – thanks for visiting. I’m sure they’ve been featured on these ‘entertainment’ shows – just something I don’t watch. Goat’s cheese is good …

@ Susan – oh great that you’ve come across ‘myotonic’ in your health care role … but it hadn’t been linked for informative purposes to these goats. I thought goat jerky would be on offer in the States …

@ Mark – it’s just one of those strange phenomenon that made me want to know more – and then you and other readers get it as a post – glad it made you laugh …

@ Lee – yes, I’d like to see it happening – Lenny tells me I can see it on YouTube – I haven’t so far looked it up … you’d be racing around trying to help each goat – only to find they’d be on their feet (wobbly with straight legs and face, no doubt) before you got to them … hope you don’t injure yourself twisting and turning from one goat to the next?! Yes, probably a good thing you don’t live near them …

@ Gary – thank you for coming by to make sure your fingers and the keyboard still works … I know too many ‘goat’ type comments could so easily be made. The weather sure is HOT …

@ Lenny – we need ‘cool’ here .. it is very HOT! But it was such a fun story to come across and I wondered at the comments I’d get – thankfully the post seems to have hit the mark …

I’d seen the youtube videos but hadn’t clicked across. I wrote about goat towers and cauliflower mountain about 4 years ago … link below. And I’d seen them in Portugal when I was out with my mother …incredible animals. Thanks for the note re Morocco – it’s good to know about …

I guessed you’d like jerk seasoning and thought you might know about curried goat … and the link to Jamaica … jerk is a good seasoning – I must learn more …

@ Donna – yes and life goes on … you faint, you wait three seconds and then get up – it is extraordinary isn’t it … and for the three legged goat race –I hope it’s humans taking part and they can cope with trolls – I think!

Cheers everyone … we’re now in to HOT weather – it makes a change … but I’m glad I’m by the cooling coast … Hilary

Here’s the link to my Cauliflower Mountain post relative to climbing goats …
http://positiveletters.blogspot.co.uk/2013/11/cauliflower-fountain-more-commonly.html

Lynn said...

My goodness - fainting goats! And I've not heard of the variety that is nearby in Tennessee. Wonderful post, Hilary!

Sharon K. Mayhew said...

What a great post! I love goats. We had them when I was a kid. We got milk from them. I have no idea what kind they were. Mum just bought them at a farmers market. I guess when she moved into town she sold them. We never ate them. They were like pets.

Madeleine Sara said...

Oh the poor wee goats! I just wish I could think of a suitable limerick about them. :)

Kali Delamagente said...

Who knew a goat could faint! But why not? That's a great plot point.

Sara C. Snider said...

I saw a video some years back of the fainting goats, well, fainting. I find it both adorable and a little bit sad. Seems like it must be terrifying just freezing up like that. Anyway, was great to learn more about them. :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lynn - are they quite near you ... I guess they'd be fun to see .. and the little ones (nephews and nieces) would enjoy them ...

@ Sharon - what fun to know you had goats growing up and had their milk. Yes of course the move to town would mean letting them go to another home ... and I'm sure to you they were like pets ...

@ Madeleine - I feel there is a limerick in there for them from someone - one day ...

@ Kali - well it's this syndrome and it can happen to us apparently ... strange but true! Yes it could be a good plot point in a story couldn't it ...

@ Sara - what fun - I must look one out ...it's the wooden legged look (stand) that makes me laugh ... I can conjure all kinds of horrible ideas there. As you say - adorable and sad ... I guess they'd be used to it and not realise what's happened and get on with their lives ...

Cheers to you all - from another hot day here ... Hilary

Linda said...

I know nothing about bridge, but I do love a good limerick. I don't think I've heard one based on a true story before.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Linda - I took the comment over to the "WEP Bridges" post and replied there .. so delighted you enjoyed the limerick ... cheers Hilary