Tuesday, 25 July 2017

Croquet anyone? … before Tennis, Rosewater, Great British Menu and Equality arrived …




This year Wimbledon was celebrating 140 years since the Championships were founded … the inaugural Wimbledon Championships began on 9 July 1877 – the Gentlemen’s Singles being the only event held.

Wimbledon complex with the
Centre Court at the centre


The Club had started out in 1868 as the “All England Lawn Croquet Club” … lawn tennis was added in 1876 … tennis was added into the name the same year – it originally had the incredible name of Sphairistiké – translated from ancient Greek as ‘the art of playing ball’!  It became known as Stické or Stické tennis – hence, thankfully, tennis is its name … I was never any good at languages – ancient or modern!



Timeline - found here
c/o BBC



Over the years life changed … the Championships became simply known as Wimbledon – the oldest tennis tournament in the world - and is widely regarded as the most prestigious.  It also promotes gender equality …




Media coverage of the Championships has been broadcast on radio by the BBC since 1927, black and white tv coverage began in 1937, full colour tv was launched in 1967 …





Sir David Attenborough
… guess who was instrumental in bringing us Wimbledon in colour – none other than Sir David Attenborough – broadcaster and naturalist.  His career within the Beeb is interesting – see link.


So Wimbledon is celebrating 90 years of radio broadcast, 70 years of tv coverage and 50 years of colour tv … and what better way to note these events – than to have a Great British Menu Banquet for tennis dignitaries.



This has become an annual series … which I mostly enjoy … seeing top British chefs compete within regions to cook one course for the banquet – themed around the particular event being promoted each year … so lots of balls around in 2017!



Each week the chefs battle for their dish to be selected for the final banquet menu.   I’ll link to the post I wrote in 2012 (which was in recognition of the Olympics) … oddly and fittingly enough this was the evening my mother died – strange: I hadn’t realised that before.  She was an excellent cook and loved different ideas … this is perfect for those memories of my Ma and Cornwall.


Finally this year – we had two female chefs winning through … though Pip Lacey inspired my Carpaccio post, as this was her starter dish in 2015 … and if you hadn’t guessed it by now – a Turkish-Cypriot chef – who used … you guessed this too – Rosewater!



Back to 2017’s recipes, gender equality matched, – titled as below …


Starter:  Pip Lacey (from the Midlands) – “Whatever The Weather”

Her course comprised pickled heritage radish, sautéed runner beans, pickled courgettes, honey-soused tomatoes, tomato hearts, and goat’s cheese ravioli (purple and green – Wimbledon colours) served in a yellow ‘tennis ball’ bowl;  “hot tomato rain” in watering cans to be poured over.

Ceramic tennis ball filled with summer veggies c/o BBC


FishTommy Banks (North East) – “Turbot with Strawberries and Cream”

The turbot was decorated with red strawberries pickled with elderflower vinegar, fermented green strawberries and a creamy herb velouté was a surprising hit – Wimbledon strawberries featuring in the fish course.
 
Tommy Banks' winning dish c/o BBC

Main CourseMichael Bremner (Scotland) – “The Grass is Greener”


Ox tongue topped with jux-filled ravioli and served with pickled summer vegetables and rye-grass cooked potatoes.  (Rye grass – because that is the type of grass used for the courts).


Michael Bremner's dish c/o BBC


DessertSelin Kiazim (London + South East) – “Honouring Venus Rosewater Champions”

Vanilla muhallebi (creamy dessert base), white peach and raspberry jelly, served with peach sorbet, raspberry and rosewater sauce, almond meringue shard and a peach bellini.  Looks amazing!

Selin Kiazim's wonderful creation c/o BBC


I know – 'I can hear’ some of you thinking … good heavens above – what a palaver … but it’s a series I enjoy and watch as much as I can – my light entertainment … and this year combining it with a Wimbledon banquet was a delight to my blog posting thoughts!

Close up of Selin's dessert



I will tell you quietly that they wanted the Banquet outside at Wimbledon … well fine – but it rains here!  So rapidly it was moved indoors  … the bit that disappoints me (each year) is the final programme showing the Banquet and preparations … just not enough time to do the whole justice … I’d really enjoy it!

Right that’s me done showcasing Rosewater and Wimbledon for another year … though I do have other tennis posts I’d like to write … the pineapple, some art and posters … but next year isn’t far away … is it?!


 Believe it or not … I have more rose type posts to write up – but I’ll give them a break for a while … I have exhibitions to post … so a change-up coming next …



… also the “We are the World Blogfest … in Darkness, Be Light” is up next weekend … I hope some of you will join us … 

full details and sign up here ... Simon's We are Still Warmly Welcoming #WATWB 


Croquet equipment

Croquet has been kicked into the long grass, Wimbledon’s shaved lawns have come and gone, equality has been achieved … and Rosewater after the 2017 Great British Menu could be ready for us to rinse our hands, after the mouth-watering banquet … until next year …



Wimbledon colour flowers for you
all for sticking with me through these posts!
Thank you.

Summary came from - T-Vine ... the free English-language magazine for British Turks  detailed in the link below:

Selin Kiazim's participation detailed here T-Vine's Great British Menu contestants page and details ... including the recipe summaries I've set out in the post ... 

History of  Wimbledon and the BBC 1927 - 2017 - charting the development through the years

Recipes can be found here c/o BBC:  




Ladies Dressed in White ... was Selin's original dish - which she changed to the one I've shown in the post ... 

Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

46 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

I find the Great British Menu fascinating and look forward to this one reaching us in a year or two. I will admit to being miffed when no woman won in the year the WI honoured.
As always, thank you so much for expanding my knowledge.
And, whether he likes the phrase or not Sir David is a global (not just a National) treasure. A talented man, from a very talented family.

Ann Bennett said...

Quite a repast the meal would be. My favorite is the Whatever the Weather. However, I prefer plain eats. This is an interesting series. When you get back to it, I'll be all eyes to read it.

Out on the prairie said...

I watched a Lebanese cooking show and she used rosewater in everything she made for desserts.

DeeDee said...

In India, people use a rosewater for quite a few desserts.
such a lovely read this was.
thanks fro sharing

Click Here to see what Mrs. Dash Says

bazza said...

Gosh, I feel hungry now. Anyone for venison?
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s sagacious Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Christine Rains said...

How amazing that the tournament has been broadcasted for that many years. And how beautiful the food!

Susan Scott said...

Lovely post Hilary, got my tummy rumbling. Rosewater and witchhazel is an excellent tonic for the skin after cleansing that I simply cannot find anywhere. How about Turkish Delight made with rosewater?

Am desperately trying to think of a @#WATWB post!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC - yes I usually enjoy watching GBM ... but sometimes think it's a bit much - but I have to admire the creative ability of the chefs. Actually the Women's Institute one I think was disappointing ... and as you say no woman won a course ... possibly (probably) didn't match up. Glad you enjoyed the post ...

I know Sir David is a global treasure - a talented man from a talented family - that's for sure.

@ Ann - the meal must have been delicious ... I'd have loved all of those dishes ... I like variety - though also delight in simple foods. Well it's on the web - per the links ... and won't happen til next year ... I hope you get a chance to look at the links ...

@ Steve - I love Lebanese cooking ... and yes, they definitely use a lot of rosewater in the middle-east ...

@ DeeDee - I know Indians use a lot of rosewater too - they have lovely desserts. So glad you enjoyed the read ...

@ Bazza - well venison is a little too heavy for this time of year - so can I stick with this menu ... thank you!

@ Christine - yes Wimbledon was used as testing ground for outside broadcasting - so glad it worked! I agree the food does look beautiful ...

@ Susan - thank you ... trouble with foodie posts and rumbling tummies...

Rosewater and Witchhazel is available on Amazon - but I think you can't get it out there ...

Turkish Delight is another story ... soooo good - especially the rosewater one ...

Thanks so much to you all - so good to see you - cheers Hilary

Liz A. said...

Lawn tennis sounds so refined. But watching them play... Interesting how many round number anniversaries are this year.

Janie Junebug said...

I love the tennis ball bowl. It's ideal. I'm amazed that TV coverage began in 1937. How many people had televisions so they could watch?

Love,
Janie

Suzanne Furness said...

I watched several episodes of Great British Menu, some fun and interesting dishes for sure. I don't play tennis but the more traditional croquet is a favourite in our house!

L. Diane Wolfe said...

Presentation is everything. The dish in the tennis ball is clever.

Rhodesia said...

I have to admit to seldom watching TV. Some sport and Strictly is about my limit. I do try to make sure I see the Wimbledon final, but this year we had a car run on so I missed that as well.
Mmmmmm that menu looks good enough to eat, delicious. Hope all is well Diane

Kay G. said...

Richard lived very close to Wimbledon when he was in Croydon but guess what, he never went there! I love tennis myself, and I love the tradition of Wimbledon.

Elsie Amata said...

I could be very wrong here because I don't know the first thing about tennis other than when I played it a few months ago I was tore up from the floor up..oh wait, that's a southern term for having a bit too much to drink, anyway, it just about killed me. Anyway, I had a doctor who traveled every year to the US Open...I think that leads to Wimbledon, but I'm not certain. He never missed it! That's education on tennis: it hurts to play (but it's a ton of fun!) and my neuro loves it.

Elsie

Jo said...

Boy would I like to have attended that banquet. It sounded lovely.

Golf is supposed to have meant Gentlemen Only Ladies Forbidden. I don't know how true that is but the sexism of the original Wimbledon made me think of that. Those gentlemen tennis players would be shocked today. Enjoyed your Wimbledon posts Hilary, thank you.

Marja said...

wow 90 years of Wimbledon I remember how we used to watch it in the summer back in Holland. Here you don't see much of it.
I am glad I don't get to go close to the dishes these chefs meet. I am on a diet at the moment and wouldn't be able to resist any of them. Mouth watering indeed.

Deborah Weber said...

I've certainly enjoyed your Rosewater series, and I've learned so much about Wimbledon. I had no idea how complex and multi-faceted the affair is - and how fun. The Whatever the Weather recipe looks a right delight, and I'm certainly smiling at the watering can.

Anabel Marsh said...

Tennis ball / watering can combination is genius!

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

I found this interesting because I knew none of this

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Liz – I learnt to play tennis on a grass court – luck of the draw re the timeline dates aligning …

@ Janie – it’s amazing that tennis ball bowl. Few people would have had tvs in 1937 … but like cars … I expect few had them in 1900 – but now?! Then they were all black, now coloured … so it similarly went with tvs becoming a standard part of our living rooms … now all places.

@ Suzanne – yes there were some creative dishes weren’t there. I remember croquet is the thing at your house … and yes we play that too in various family/friend’s homes …

@ Diane – presentation certainly helps … but if the dishes don’t match the brief … then that’s it and they don’t get very high marks …

@ Diane – I don’t watch reality tv – I watch when I can and when it’s something that will amuse/entertain me. This year I didn’t watch either final – as like you other things were on the cards … I hope you’ll show us some of the cars in a post …

I particularly liked this year’s menu – the dishes appealed (a great deal)!

@ Kay – tennis isn’t everyone’s cup of tea … yet for those of us who love the idea of Wimbledon and its traditions – it’s almost essential – well it is for me!

@ Elsie – I’m glad you had a chance to try tennis and enjoyed it … despite the inebriation state! They don’t go together well … I’m afraid to say. Your doctor friend was going to the last grand slam of the year … there are 4 of them … Australia in January, Paris in May, then Wimbledon end June/July and the US Open – late August into September.

@ Jo – I too would have loved to have been there … Golf was pretty biased, but finally this year (2017) Muirfield, the club, voted to admit women as members for the first time in its history! The food links are in with you in mind …

@ Marja – I know 90 years of outside broadcasting from Wimbledon; and when I lived in South Africa in the late 70s – there was practically no Wimbledon on tv … mind you tv across the Republic was pretty new then.

Good luck with the diet … and as you say the dishes sound totally mouth-watering don’t they …

@ Deborah – that’s great to know you’ve enjoyed ‘the series on rosewater’ … and it’s interesting – many of you comment on the ‘Whatever the Weather’ recipe … with its watering can full of tomato water.

@ Anabel – another ‘Whatever the Weather’ fan … in its ceramic tennis ball bowl, with watering can …

@ Jo-Anne – that’s great … I’m happy you enjoyed it and could learn something that appealed to you …
Thank you so much … fascinating to see how many of you delighted in the watering can and its tennis ball bowl – cheers Hilary

Kim Blades said...

Hi Hilary. I managed to connect to this post without a problem. I don't know what was the matter the other day, probably just a bad internet connection. We get all the British chef and cooking programmes on DSTV here and I occasionally watch them. I'm not a great TV fan as I prefer to read and now I can just look at other peoples blogs, like yours, to get the yummy recipes. Have a lovely day and rest of the week. Kim

Keith's Ramblings said...

I too loved the Great British Menu, partly I suppose because I was cheffing myself until a few years ago. Some of the presentation was a bit over the top but generally speaking, it was all pretty good! Yum yum!

Click to visit Keith's Ramblings

Kali Delamagente said...

Very interesting. I always feel so much smarter after visiting your blog.

Today, I'm also hungrier.

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

It'd be great fun watching the chefs compete to have their recipes included in the big menu. I'm a fan of all kinds of cooking shows in TV, and this one would be extra special.

Not sure how I'd be with the chosen dishes, though. I'd certainly love to taste them, but a lot of those ingredients are outside my comfort zone. Like ox tails... But that dessert? No problem. I've rarely met a dessert I didn't like.

I must confess, I was never a fan of croquet as a child. Maybe it was because only the "rich kids" had sets, and they were so prim and proper compared to me. Those girls were prissy and I was... not. (Why in the world would I want to wear a frilly dress and white gloves to play in somebody's yard in the hot sun when I could be climbing a tree or digging up worms to go fishing...?) Given the opportunity to play now, I'd probably enjoy the game, though. (As long as nobody expects me to get all dressed up to play it!)

Cheers! Fun post, Hilary.

Silvia Villalobos said...

Thank you for the background on both the tennis tournament I so enjoy watching when times allows and Sir David. I've learned quite a bit. And those photos ... now I'm positively hungry. :) I will check into the blogfest for sure.

Victoria Marie Lees said...

Another wonderful post, Hilary! I used to watch Sir David Attenborough's documentaries on the television. I learned so much from him. Of course at that time, I didn't understand so much, too. And I love playing tennis. I'm not good at it, but I love playing it. The food looks delicious! I'm sorry to hear about your Mom. We keep our loved ones alive through our memories.

Oh, by the way, Congratulations! I have nominated you and your wonderful blog to receive the Liebster Blogging Award. Please visit my Adventures in Writing blog to find the details: https://victoriamarielees.blogspot.com/
You will find your blog listed there with brief details about it and some questions to answer.

Mary Montague Sikes said...

We love Wimbledon and look forward to it each year. My husband and I were tennis fanatics for years. I would sometimes play all day long in the heat and humidity. Now, we only have time for occasional play. Wimbledon was and is our favorite tournament.

Thanks for sharing!

Joanne said...

very fun post and I like the tennis bowl to serve up food - quite clever. Surely stuff must taste better in it.
the dessert pic and description you listed sounded wonderful. Wow.
and I love the word Palaver...you are just the best writer.

I've watched Wimbledons since I can remember. Always the classiest. The all white outfits, the sharp dressed ball boys and girls, the ceremony itself - absolutely top notch.

Kudos. Game Set Match, Hilary

Blogoratti said...

What a wonderful achievement to be proud of, after all these years. It certainly is an important brand known worldwide and always a pleasure to watch. Wonderful post, thanks for sharing and greetings!

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

I've sort of been able to read this. Still a bit blurry in the right eye but I'm starting to see my computer screen and not an aquarium.

Some more fascinating insights into Wimbledon. Although, you mention croquet and I start thinking of Alice in Wonderland.

I saw that recent documentary about Sir David and how he was instrumental in bringing colour broadcasts to Wimbledon.

Nice mention of that cooking show, the Great British Menu. Penny wants to enter The Great British Bark Off.

Thanks, Hilary.

Gary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Kim – oh good …I’m glad it appears to be just a glitch. I don’t watch an awful lot of tv … but enjoy some programmes – preferably educational ones. Reading is something I should do more of … but I learn a lot from friend’s blogs …

@ Keith – I imagined you’d like the GBM – and I agree some parts are OTT … but it can be fun to see them create their delicious looking dishes.

@ Kali – thanks so much … I’ve tried to come over to your blog – so far no luck … I’ll try again …

@ Susan – I look forward to the show and to see what the criteria will be each year … and how the chefs meet those. I’ve always loved trying new dishes … so I’m up for anything that’s offered up – just ‘cross’ I can’t join in! Love ox tail … though this was ox-tongue … but I know that’s not the sort of ingredient many would eat.

Yes I can see croquet being slightly elitest – you need a fairly large garden (patch of grass) … I can imagine people getting dressed in their best for the neighbourhood games in posh gardens years ago … I’d change if I had to – e.g. tennis whites … but I also climbed trees, or found worms in manure heaps … we only fished pooh-bear style …

It’s certainly a good game for a group of friends or house guests … entertains a few for some hours …

@ Silvia – glad you enjoyed reading up about the background to the tournament … it’s a hundred + years of history in the life of Britain and now to some extent the world. Sir David Attenborough is one amazing man isn’t he …

… the food looks all too good – I’m glad it’s further up the page and I can’t see it! – if not I’d be hungry too!! That’s great if you’d join the We are the World Blogfest – this weekend … excellent news.

@ Victoria – oh thank you … David Attenborough’s documentaries were the best and still are – he has to be nearly perfection … and yes we all learn. I’ve learnt so much since I started blogging.

I love the Great British Menu series – usually. And my Ma I’m sure would have enjoyed watching too – funny that the Olympics GBM post happen to tie in … all good memories.

Thanks for the award – I’m afraid I don’t participate – but I’ll be over and perhaps answer some on your blog … sorry about that – appreciate the award though.

@ Mary – it’s a good game isn’t it … I played for years and then switched to squash … now it’s all beyond me. Like you I used to happily play all day … wonderful days! Wimbledon does seem to stand out amongst the four majors …

@ Joanne – the tennis ball bowl seems to have appealed to many of us … I tried to find a picture of the contents – but couldn’t … I think pouring tomato water from the watering can must bring the dish together … though the rest of dishes I’d be very happy eating.

Thanks re ‘palaver’ … and for my descriptive writing … appreciate that.

Wimbledon forms a part of my life – playing locally and then watching when I could and sometimes going … it is a smart professionally run tournament … top notch = good phrase. Thanks for the ‘kudos – game, set and match’ to me!

@ Blogoratti – Wimbledon does seem to stand out in the crowd and is as you say always professionally screened … the branding makes it unique …

@ Gary – I’m so glad your eye seems to be easing … take care – that was an unfortunate incident. Yes those flamingoes and hedgehogs make for some interesting thoughts as to playing croquet at Alice’s … in her Wonderland …

That documentary was very good wasn’t it – I enjoyed all the history and how Sir David shaped the Beeb after the War … does Penny want to enter the Great British Menu … well that would add another dimension to it … good luck Penny with your creative flair …

Cheers to you all – thanks for these lovely comments and thoughts – still misty, cool and cloudy here: wonderful summer weather! All the best - Hilary

Sherry Ellis said...

Nice to learn more about the Wimbledon. I did not know it has been broadcast that many years.

Lynn said...

I would love to watch that show! Thanks for sharing what they made - I'm salivating over here.

And I love how Wimbledon is so civilized. I like to watch that, too.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sherry - excellent ... so glad you enjoyed learning more and yes, it was one of the first outside broadcasts when they were testing out tv!

@ Lynn - I'm sure it's available on a tv service in the States ... Wimbledon is certainly civilised isn't it - usually very polite and fair all round ..

Cheers to the two of you and thank for being here and commenting - Hilary

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

These are some complex recipes! I'm always amazed how folks are able to come up with amazing dishes with so many different, exotic ingredients.

I watched Wimbledon some this year--whenever I was on the treadmill at the gym it happened to be on. :) I love watching tennis, but always forget to tune in for Wimbledon! I remember going there and walking through the museum...thanks as always for the interesting tidbits (helps jog my memory from 25 years ago!)

Karen Jones Gowen said...

I enjoy cooking but the contestants on that show must be absolutely passionate and insane about it to even get on the show. I watched it once and would like to see it regularly. Sir David Attenborough is the best. A nature show narrated by anyone else just isn't as good.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Elizabeth - they are created by professional head chefs ... who have a Michelin star, or are near their peak of achieving one ... so highly capable.

I'm glad you were able to get to see the Museum at Wimbledon - something I've never been to - but must make a trip one day. Excellent this has jogged your memory of your trip here 25 years ago ...

@ Karen - they are professional chefs at the top of their game ... this raises their profile. I'm not sure how the chefs are selected to compete in the regional heats prior to the show. I know the series is available in the States - so it's available to be found...

Thanks so much for the visit ... have good weekends - cheers Hilary

Pamela Wright said...

So fascinating about the croquet being at Wimbledon first - I never knew that. I'm a big fan of the Great British Menu and was really pleased that two women won through to the final banquet this year, though there were some other dishes that I thought sounded scrummier than the ones that were chosen. Thanks for another great post and have a good day.

mail4rosey said...

I love that they made the ravioli colors to match the event. :) I like to eat outside, but definitely can understand the need to take it inside. Rain can ruin careful preparations in an instant.

Nick Wilford said...

Imagine we were all still watching the croquet championships each year! It's an interesting sport but it doesn't really get the blood pumping in the same way. I'm a sucker for those type of programmes too - including the Bake Off and Masterchef - the creativity going into the dishes is amazing. Couldn't do anything like it but I enjoy watching it!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Pam - it is interesting that croquet was held in such high regard in the middle of the 1800s - we still have a few clubs around, including Wimbledon. Glad you enjoy the Great British Menu as well - and yes yay! for two women winning through ...

@ Rosey - I agree .. that touch of the ravioli in green and purple was very clever to match the Wimbledon colours. Unfortunately the day they chose for the actual lunch was a typical British one ... very damp. Still thankfully nothing was ruined by the rain ...

@ Nick - yes that would be something very funny ... but it is colourful - demanded by colour tv. I can't watch the others ... actually I do watch some of Masterchef ... as you say the creative thought that goes into each dish is just wonderful to see. I'd enjoy eating the meals!!

Cheers to you all - well that's tennis over for the year ... but croquet, perhaps that's something I need to highlight at some stage ... thanks for visiting - have happy weekends - Hilary

Emily Bloomquist said...

It all comes back to rosewater :)

I had no idea Wimbledon has been on the radio since 1927. Quite impressive!

Fun post Hilary.

Emily

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Emily - delighted you enjoyed it ... the history of things here in the UK is always interesting giving us some oddities or surprises to write about - delighted you enjoyed the post ... and yes, it all comes back to rosewater! Cheers Hilary

DMS said...

My fiance loves watching tennis and I have gotten into it myself. Loved learning more about the history of Wimbledon here. Always interesting and unique facts on your blog. Thanks so much for sharing. :)
~Jess

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Jess - oh! congratulations on your engagement - and wonderful you're playing tennis together. So pleased this post 'embraced' aspects of Wimbledon ... and you found out some interesting snippets ... great to see you - cheers Hilary