Friday, 2 February 2018

Two films featuring an Austrian exotic beauty and the second a Canadian folk artist ...



I saw these films recently ... one at the local theatre/library centre, while the other was put on by one of the local organisations ... 


"Hedy Lamarr" and "Maudie" Lewis are the 'stars' of these two films ... one an obvious exotic beauty with brains, and one with a crippling autoimmune disease whose imagination paints pictures ...



The Lamarr film (2017) has just been released and will be available elsewhere soon ... it tells the life story of Lamarr, who was stunningly beautiful, yet had a brain with a flair for invention, becoming a pioneer in the field of wireless communications.




Hedy Lamarr 1944

It was booked out, so I sat in row A in the middle ... my head was bent back onto my spine ... but I am looking forward to seeing the film again - as it was quite difficult to read the captions or see the collages - part of the way the film is made ... and also to take cognizance of all the details ... 


In fact her inventions ... not recognised nor acknowledged in WW2 saved many lives, yet today using "spread spectrum" technology underpins our wireless communications: cell phones, blue tooth, GPS  et al ... now worth billions.

George Antheil



She has recently been acknowledged, along with co-inventor George Antheil, the avant-garde composer, who have through their inventions made the world a better place, by being inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.


"Maudie" (2016) ties in to one I saw with our film society in Eastbourne that also brilliantly portrays a struggling artist: "Seraphine" (2008).  



Sally Hawkins superbly portrays Maud, who has led a troubled life, while Ethan Hawke, a surly fish peddler, is her employer until they sort of decide to marry - the story line as they move through life, she as his housekeeper of a one bedroom shack ... makes for some interesting personality skirmishes ... 


We find out a lot about Maud's background and the mal-treatment that she has endured ... 

Nova Scotia

She starts to paint in the house ... slowly, then adds more ... which is not appreciated by her employer/husband ... she then starts painting small cards on rough paper or boards found around the place ... which are bought and supplement their impoverished lives ... 

Maud Lewis at her home

After a while her art gets recognised just as her disease takes a real hold - Hawkins' portrayal of the rheumatoid arthritic Maud is amazing ... and at the end of the film we are given a quick glimpse of the real life Maud and her husband ... 







When I read a review of Maudie in the Guardian ... the Seraphine film is mentioned - and they do tie in together ... I'd recommend both.  



Maudie is set in the 1920s era, while Seraphine with its French and German links falls into the WW1 time frame ... Maudie finds a can of paint for her floral folk art, Seraphine uses nature's offerings ... soil, bark, blood of a dead animal ... 





c/o Art Pondering -
Seraphine's art work


They are both intriguing films showing ways of life we will not have known - our parents and grandparents might have told us ... 




So the three films - Hedy Lamarr with her passion for various hobbies and inventions after her film work finished for the day ... the two films about women who had remarkable talent for painting ... eventually after struggles becoming recognised in the art world.



We go from Austria and war, to America with Hedy; we see the poverty ridden area of a near closed society in beautiful Nova Scotia with Maudie, while Seraphine takes us back to France and WW1 with its devastating ups and downs for the population of Europe at that time.  


Maud Lewis (1903 - 1970)
All three films noting the challenges that women have faced to be accepted for their achievements ... 


I do hope you'll be able to get to see all three of these films ... 




Another link - America's Inventors ... which details the devices enabled by Hedy and George's inventions ... and perhaps a better overview of her life ... 

Encyclopedia of Canada article on Maud Lewis ... 

Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

78 comments:

Anabel Marsh said...

These all sound really good and I hadn’t heard of any of them. Will definitely look out for them now.

Karen Walker said...

Someone else told me about Hedy Lamar being an inventor - that's fascinating. Will definitely check that one out.

Natalie Aguirre said...

I hadn't heard of any of these, but especially the Hedy Lamar one sounds good. Hoping they come around here or are on Netflix sometime.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

I've heard of Maud Lewis. Saw a short special on her a while back.

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

I had no idea that Hedy Lamarr was an inventor! I'd only heard of her acting. Thanks for filling me in and for the introduction to these movies. :)

Joanne said...

You are ahead of me on these films and they sound quite intriguing. I shall keep a look out. (My father loved Hedy Lamarr for the movie star she was - one of the most beautiful)

L. Diane Wolfe said...

I had no idea Lamar was an inventor, too.

Anonymous said...

I have to say these are not the kind of films I would normally watch even so something always tells me I should do - as have you in your post! I'm tempted!

Click to visit Keith's Ramblings

jabblog said...

Fascinating films. I'm glad Hedy Lamarr was eventually recognised for her scientific work.

bazza said...

Well you've sold these films to me even though they are bit 'girlie!' A good film is a good film no matter what the subject. The Hedy Lamarr one appeals most.
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s strange Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Rhodesia said...

Interesting. I wonder if they will come to our local. We get some pretty good English films but of course there are far more French ones here. Have a good weekend Diane

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Anabel - they are excellent ... so great you'll be looking out for them.

@ Karen - Hedy Lamarr was very talented ... just stunningly beautiful as well ...

@ Natalie - the art ones are excellent - but I understand most of you will go for Hedy - just please check them all out.

@ Alex - Maud Lewis was certainly an incredible woman, let alone interpretative painter - so glad you've let us know about the 'short' on her ...

@ Elizabeth - great to see your comment ... so I'll know you'll look the three films out ...

@ Joanne - probably because they're more art-house films ... but so worthwhile - I learnt a lot from looking at them ... perhaps you can see the Hedy one with your father when you visit ...

@ Diane - hidden secrets ... she was a genius ...

@ Keith - I so appreciate these sorts of films and learn much about areas of life I'd be unlikely to find out about any other way ... seeing as I read but not that much ... so please get watching!

@ Janice - lovely to see you ... and yes you'd obviously realised Lamarr's inventive skills ... hidden for so long.

@ Bazza - that's excellent ... Mrs Bazza will be happy to see them - they're about real life ... I'd recommend the other two over Hedy - but that's interesting to see her life too ...

@ Diane - they might ... they are avant-garde films ... and one is French, one is Irish-Canadian ... the Hedy one is American ... all excellent ...

Thanks so much and I'm sure you'll enjoy these films when you get to watch them ... I loved the art ones particularly - as they're about life we wouldn't normally see ... but just select and enjoy - cheers Hilary

Ann Best said...

My era truly...they all look so wonderful. Hedy Lamarr, ah yes. This one is definitely intriguing.

Lenny Lee said...

i have to be honest and say i never heard of any of these women or the films. so i looked on you-tube and there's info and videos about all of them. on one about Hedy Lamarr it said after losing all the glamour and struggling she ended up shoplifting. but, eventually she pulled herself up and played her best role... an inventor. you can watch a couple of her movies on you-tube. really interesting. i always learn a lot from your posts.

Fil said...

Thanks for these recommendations Hilary - "not just a pretty face" springs to mind about Lamarr - never heard that before. I love hearing stories about women who make great achievements - these films will make a pleasant change from all the violent thrillers or else schmaltzy romcoms around at the minute. Fil x

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Ann - thanks good to see you - the Hedy Lamarr one is so interesting ...

@ Lenny - I didn't think you'd have heard of these women ... and there is lots of information out there on them. Hedy had a tragic ending ... she was ahead of the curve all the way, even as far as plastic surgery... yet now vindicated - she was so patriotic to America.

She learnt from her first husband who was involved with Hitler developing bombs and other hateful weapons ... before she escaped to London and ultimately the States - using her acting abilities and beauty ... but at night she invented.

@ Fil - yes these are definitely worth watching and that phrase "not just a pretty face" does spring to mind ... so many celebrities are cleverer than they 're given credit for.

I can't do schmaltzy either or violent thrillers ...

Thank you so much for visiting and commenting - always love getting the comments - cheers Hilary

Chatty Crone said...

My mom and I would watch Hedy Lamar act in those old movies. Fond memories.

Out on the prairie said...

all sound very inspirational to see. I need to visit the cinemas soon., lots out to see

Liza said...

Hedy Lamarr sounds like she was amazing. Thanks for the reviews!

Paula Kaye said...

Hedy Lamar was a beauty!

Sue Bursztynski said...

Goodness, a Hedy Lamarr bio film! I hope I get a chance to see it. Yes, it’s amazing what she achieved - and when she offered this to the US government they told her she would be better off raising money for the Cause by selling kisses. Which she did. I remember reading that some years ago, when she was offered an award for services to science, she sniffed, “Hmm! About time!” Her son collected it as she was getting on in years at the time. Imagine, such an important scientific discovery, made by an actress and a musician...

DMS said...

I have not heard of any of these- but all of them sound very interesting. I am so glad to have learned about them here- as they sound like ones I would enjoy. Thanks for sharing. :)

~Jess

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sandie - if I ever see one of her movies on the tv - I'll look for sure .. but her brain was her thing ...

@ Steve - these are so well worth seeing, but as you say other films may draw you in ...

@ Liza - Hedy was exceptional ... as well as beautiful ...

@ Paula - a beauty she was ...

@ Sue - yes - it's an amazing compilation. As you say there was an awful lot to her - which I couldn't put in here ... and it was about time she was recognized, as they've come to realise. It was the way George had created a piano piece using punched tape ... that set Hedy off on their joint invention ... I do hope you'll get to see it - so worth while ...

@ Jess - such interesting films and so I hope you'll get to see them.

It's a pleasure to share things here - it's always lovely to read your informed comments - thanks so much - cheers Hilary

troutbirder said...

Oh my. Not to blot my longstanding record as a feminist perhaps before the termer was even invented but oh my remembering that beautiful movie star who I remember from my boyhood helped win WWII as an inventor.... oh my and nobody ever told me that before. Wow!!!

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

All of these movies sound good, but the only one of these women I knew much about is Hedy Lamarr. She was both beautiful and brilliant. The story of how she came to get interested in spread spectrum technology is quite fascinating. She got the idea initially by observing a player piano. Her physical beauty didn't last forever, but her inventions still have a huge impact in today's world.

Cheers! Have a super weekend!

Nilanjana Bose said...

Women have had a hard time all through history - but at least they are getting the recognition they deserve this century. Lamarr I've heard of, thanks for introducing me to the other two.

Have a lovely weekend.

Kim Blades said...

Hi Hilary. I hope you are keeping well. All three films sound really interesting. Hedy Lamar reminds me of Elizabeth Taylor. Throughout history women have played crucial roles in the development of civilization and society, it is a pity a lot of men still consider women as being 'lesser' beings than them. Take care. Kim x

Pat Hatt said...

They sure go on about Maude Lewis here, as she was near. Surprisingly I never did see the movie. Lots of specials and history stuff though.

P. J. Lazos said...

I had no idea Heady Lamar was an inventor. Bombshell and brilliant. Good for her. I will take your advice, Hilary, and watch these movies. Thank you!

Betsy Brock said...

My goodness, Maude does sound amazing! I haven't seen either of these movies...both sound fabulous!

Kali Delamagente said...

Both sound really good, Hilary. I'd heard Hedy was pretty smart but never thought much about it. Love the story of Maude. It reminds me of an autistic man who draws pictures with his keyboard. They are absolutely brilliant. I share them with my students.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Troutbirder - I hear a little bit of nostalgia for your pin up?! She was some bright lady ... I hope you clicked through for the links ...

@ Susan - Hedy's story line is really amazing ... she was one strong determined, highly intelligent, lady. The piano roll ... was used by Antheil ... which they realised could give them control over radio frequencies.

She was ahead in trying to maintain her beauty ... asking about improving her body line - and plastic surgery ... but as you say her inventions certainly are still around ...

@ Nila - women do have a hard time through history ... but eventually many get acknowledged ... but how unfair is it all.

@ Kim - all well here, thank you. The films are really fascinating - and Hedy does look like Elizabeth Taylor doesn't she ... in fact many of the actresses of the day copied Hedy's hair style - she was a real trend-setter ...

Women have at least 50% of the credit for our lives today - more than I'd say ... as they give birth to the 'boys' too!

@ Pat - are you in Maud's geographical area, then I can imagine it gets a bit much ... but I loved the film ...

@ PJ - I'd never realised the back story to Hedy, so was really interested to see the film - absolutely fascinating life - sad, but so clever.

@ Betsy - that's great ... the films are delightful - so glad you'll keep your eyes out for them and give them a go ...

@ Jacqui - I find it so interesting to learn these different things - I haven't really encountered Hedy in films either ... I'm sure her inventing life was a whole lot more interesting .. but she was so beautiful.

How interesting to learn about the autistic man who draws via his keyboard - that ability to see things differently to us so-called normal people - I find fascinating to learn about.

Thanks to you all ... so glad these films piqued your interest ... just enjoy them ... cheers Hilary

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

Never heard of either of these movies till now

Mary Montague Sikes said...

Wow! All three movies sound really good. I want to see the Hedy Lamarr one for certain!

Andrea Ostapovitch said...

Thank-you so much for these suggestions. I'm always looking for new human interest films/books, and all 3 of these look great.

Andrea

Penny the Jack Russell dog and modest internet superstar! said...

Hi human, Hilary,

I would love to go and see all three of those films. Pawhaps, my human dad can sneak me in under his coat.

Thank you for the suggestions and stay warm!

Pawsitive wishes,

Penny πŸΆπŸ˜€

Nas said...

I will look out for these ones. They all sound really good and I hadn’t heard of any of them.

Liz A. said...

I'll have to keep an eye out for them.

Christine Rains said...

Thank you for the film recommendations. I've heard of Lamarr just recently on Drunk History. (It's a hilarious show!) Have a lovely week, Hilary.

Kelly Hashway/Ashelyn Drake said...

These are all new to me. Thanks for sharing.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Jo-Anne - I hope you get to see one or two of them ...

@ Monti - again as an artist ... I hope you'll take a look at Maud and at Seraphine ... they are fascinating historical films too; the Lamarr film is just plain interesting ...

@ Andrea - these will certainly give you food for thought ... they are so interesting in so many ways ...

@ Penny - please let Gary know I hope he gets a chance to see them ... we're warmer here thank you - but you have your blanket of snow once again ...

@ Nas - that's excellent ... I'm sure you'll enjoy them - they have fascinating story lines ...

@ Liz - good ... they have a lot to offer ...

@ Christine - a pleasure - as the Lamarr film appeared on 'Drunk History' - interesting a programme I haven't come across before - I hope you get to see the real thing!

@ Asheyln - that's good ... so now I hope you get to see them ...

Thanks so much to you all - each of the films is worth while seeing ... cheers Hilary

cleemckenzie said...

I never did see Seraphine, but if it's on Netflix, I'm seeing it tonight. Thanks for the nudge.

I was always so impressed by Hedy Lamar and her intellect. How wonderful to have both of those gifts.

Debby Gies said...

Wonderful reviews Hilary. I'll look forward to the Hedy Lamarr story. I just watched 'Maudie' last week on television. I was mesmerized by the film. Some may have called it slow moving but I took in the many emotions of that film and my heart went out to that girl who lived an odd life in a tiny house with no electricity or running water all those years in many cold winters with her crippling rheumatism. Great historic tribute to Maude Lewis! :)

Misha Gericke said...

All three movies sound amazing. The one about Hedy Lamarr especially.

Lynn said...

Those films sound intriguing. I'll add them to my ever lengthening list!

I saw Three Billboards Outside Ebbings, Missouri over the weekend. It was an intense film - I can see why it's getting so much attention on the awards shows.

Hart Johnson said...

Of these I only knew about Hedy Lararr--fascinating women, all three of them.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

I know women are still facing a difficult road nowadays to be recognized for their work, but I really admire the women who did such remarkable things in earlier times when it was nearly impossible.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lee - I do hope you got to see Seraphine ... I'm going to see if I can get it via the library. The two artists were extraordinary. You're right Hedy Lamarr must have had amazing intellect ...

@ Debby - oh great you've seen 'Maudie' ... I just thought it was a lovely film - showing us, as you say, so much about life back then. Extraordinary place it was filmed in ... even though it wasn't where they lived - still beautiful to see even in its harshness. Thanks for this so appropriate comment ...

@ Misha - they are so worth watching ...

@ Lynn - that's great you've added them in to your list ...

I'll get to see Three Billboards Outside Ebbings when it gets here ... I'll take as many opportunities as I can to see 'interesting' films .... I saw LadyBird - didn't enjoy it much ... but was pleased to see Saoirse Ronan - as she's featuring in a few new films and is highly regarded ...

@ Hart - I hope you can get a chance to see these ...

@ Susan - women have always struggled and suffered to be able to do their thing ... so these three really enamoured me ...

Thanks so much everyone ... and I know you'll enjoy these films - cheers Hilary

Nas said...

Sounds interesting, Hilary. I will look these ones up and try to watch!

Chrys Fey said...

She was stunning. It makes me sad to learn about women who made important discoveries or did big things in history and they aren’t widely known. They deserve their recognition.

Elsie Amata said...

I haven't heard of these films...or these women. I'm so sorry you ended up straining your neck. Ouch!

Elsie

Denise Covey said...

Hi Hilary.
It's a rare day that sees me on the blogs. Of course I popped over to see what I could learn from you today. I've never heard of either film but both sound intriguing. I love things set in the '20s. Great to have the background info. :-)

Sandra Cox said...

Oh my gosh, Hilary, I had no idea that Heddy Lamarr was an inventor. How fascinating.
Great reviews!
I'll be 'officially' back tomorrow:)
Hope your day is filled with sparkle and joy.

Crystal Collier said...

So I'm sure there's a good independent theater somewhere around here, but I've never found it--maybe because I live in entertainment central and there's always something to do. I'll have to check these out.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nas - they are fascinating films ... that's good = well worth the watch.

@ Chrys - she was stunning wasn't she. And I agree way too many women through the centuries who've been ignored ... considering we do make up 50 % of the population.

@ Elsie - they're not mainstream, but are so good. Oh the crick in the neck was worth it ... but I obviously need to exercise that part of my body!

@ Denise - well I'm honoured you're here. The films are wonderful and I saw another French one, I got from the library - (2012) Therese Desqueyroux ... quite sad ... but interesting way of life and dealing with it - back in the 1920s-30s.

@ Sandra - Hedy was an extraordinary woman ... she really had so much going for her - but the powers that be wouldn't consider their ideas. It's a fascinating life story.

@ Crystal - yes these are independent style films ... not mainstream as such. I just much prefer these types of films ... and take myself off, if no-one is around ...

Cheers to you all - so glad you seem to be in tune with me ... and will take the chance to look at them sometime ... Hilary

RO said...

I didn't know about these films, but I'm absolutely fascinated to know the history of Hedy. I always enjoy knowing about interesting trivia like this and thank you so much for sharing. Happy Friday! Hugs...RO

Sherry Ellis said...

Lamarr sounds like a fascinating woman. It's a great combination to have beauty and brains.

A Cuban In London said...

They look god. Thanks for the recommendation.

Greetings from London.

Deborah Weber said...

I've been looking forward to the Lamarr film - it's nice seeing her get acknowledged for her many dimensional talents. I'll definitely be putting the other two films on my to-watch list as well. I appreciate your reviews - thanks!

Empty Nest Insider said...

Hi Hilary! Sorry you had to sit in the front row, but I'm glad you enjoyed the Hedy Lamar film. The other films sound good too, but a movie star/inventor during that time period really sparks my interest!

Thanks for your insightful reviews!

Julie

Ann Best said...

Hi, Hils. Finally finalized my blogspot blog. As in the past, I changed it several times, and now have it where it's going to stay as long as I can do the blogging! So there's a story by Jen, a Jen Memory ... would love if you could stop by and see if everything's working for visitors.

Loved reading again about Hedy, a woman a little before my time but not much. Takes me pleasantly back.

Scrolling through the comments I see some familiar faces. LOVELY.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ RO - delighted the films, particularly, the Hedy one entice you to see them at some stage ...

@ Sherry - Lamarr was an extraordinarily brilliant woman ... yes, she made the most of her brains as well as her beauty ...

@ ACIL - thanks ... so glad you enjoyed the look of these films ...

@ Deborah - it's worth seeing all about Hedy's projects and how challenging her life was ... excellent to know the other two films are on your 'to watch' list ...

@ Julie - you've been having a tough time ... well in some ways I was glad I was in the front row as the film was sold out ... yet I was at least able to see it - and realise I could easily (should) see it again ...

I'm happy you appreciate the reviews ...

@ Ann - good to see you ... have been having a few hiatuses (or hiatii) ... so delayed a while. Glad you enjoyed reading about Hedy once again ... and yes lots of wonderful people still around ...

Cheers to you all - and thanks so much for visiting - Hilary

M. Denise C. said...

Wow, Hilary! Thanks for the heads up on all three! I did see a preview for Maudie, and I did read about the Lamarr film. I cannot wait to see the Lamarr film the most. But I have to say, Sally Hawkins is a personal favorite! Can you believe it is February? Almost time for the you know what!!!!

Stephen Tremp said...

Hi Hilary, okay so this Australian TV show from the past may not be Oscar worthy but I remember as a kid watching Skippy a show about a kangaroo and a kid. I loved it and watched it every Sunday morning. I think it was the first Australian TV show that was syndicated worldwide.

Lynda Dietz said...

Sounds like you've seen some great quality movies! I'd only recently read about Hedy Lamarr's non-film accomplishments and was pretty impressed.

Bish Denham said...

Okay, I'm going to have to look into all three of these films. I've known about Lamarr's brain for quite a while and am glad she's finally being recognized!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Denise - yes rushing towards the April start of A-Z. So glad you've seen something about two of the films ... and am sure you'll get to see them.

@ Stephen - I vaguely remember the tv programme ...

@ Lynda - yes - they are wonderful films ... so interesting. Hedy Lamarr was an extraordinarily brainy talent ...

@ Bish - that's great ... I know you'll enjoy them ...

Thanks so much to you all - anyone who sees the films will enjoy them and learn from them - cheers Hilary

Lisa said...

I can't wait to see the film about Hedy. I want to see the others as well, but had no idea about her accomplishments off the screen. Thank you for the links. Hope you're keeping warm!!!

Hels said...

I didn't know much about Hedy Lamarr until the Rhodes book came out and more recently the film Bombshell. Now I find her story fascinating.

Thank you for the link
Hels
http://melbourneblogger.blogspot.com.au/2017/10/hedy-lamarr-austrian-american-jewish.html

Lynda R Young said...

I hadn't heard about these women. The films sound great.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lisa - yes Hedy was one of those amazing people who have lots of talents - hers just happen to be particularly intellectual and entrepeneurial. It is at least warming up here - thank you.

@ Hels - I hadn't really realised the film was called 'Bombshell' - but in the light of her inventions ... it's very appropriately titled. Thanks too for coming by and commenting ...

@ Lynda - the films are really enjoyable and so interesting ...

Cheers to you three and I'm so pleased it looks like you'll see some of the films - from a beautiful sunny Vancouver Island - Hilary

Anonymous said...

I didn't know that about Hedy. WOW. I love those old films. Watch them a lot. I have missed these lessons too. I am going to write a letter about all I went through and put it somewhere. I learned a lot, Hil. I missed you. I was smiling all day yesterday because you and Alex stopped by.

Have a nice trip. You deserve it. Missed and love you!!!!

Kelly Steel said...

To be truthful, I have never heard of these women and these movies!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Robyn - well it was really good to see you again. All three of these films are within the last 11 years ... so not classics ... but incredibly interesting backgrounds to these ladies - so artistic, yet one so so brainy.

I'm just glad you're back and blogging again - and it's excellent to know you enjoyed seeing your old visitors. I hope all is well ... and hope we'll stay in touch now. Believe it or not - I'm here for a couple of years ... all things being equal ...

@ Kelly - I'm so glad these are 'new' to you - I'm sure you'll enjoy them ...

Cheers to you both - and thanks for being interested - Hilary

diedre Knight said...

Fascinating post, Hilary! I love interesting fun facts and your reviews have inspired intrigue ;-) I hope you're settling into the extended visit. It seems you've been keeping yourself busy, I'm glad. Did you know the can opener was invented 48 years after the can? Boggles my mind, but I must admit I've resorted to desperate measures to open a can a time or two ;-)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Diedre - so glad the post and the films enticed you to look into them. I like to be out and about ...

I didn't know about the tin opener (as I'd call it!) ... how very interesting ... might be worthy of a post sometime ... and yes opening things can be troubling ... frustrating too - without the right implement to hand.

All the best - Hilary

Emily Bloomquist said...

I will look for all three. Thank you for the reviews Hilary. I hope that when you next see the Lamarr film you are able to sit in a better location. It is so hard to watch a movie with your nose on the screen.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Excellent Emily - they are all so interesting and so informative ... looking at life in a different way to the things we see everyday. I hope I get a chance to see the Lamarr film again at some stage ... but was glad I saw it. Cheers and thanks for coming by - Hilary