Saturday, 21 April 2018

S is for Shinplaster and Screamers ...


I guess both words could be linked ... but they're not - just Ss for short snippets ...
 
Screamer at the farm


I thought 'Screamers' was a heart-rending word for the ragged row of splintered ridges left when a tree is felled.



Screaming stumps at the farm


Emily Carr describes these torn stumps 'Screamers' as the 'last chords to break, chords in the tree's very heart' ... so perfect a desolate description.



In another of her short stories "Noah's Ark, 1934," ... she reiterates similar words - per the image I post ...
 
Photo of Emily's description of "Screamers" I took
when I visited the art gallery with her work

To completely change the subject - how many of you scream, shriek or yawl when an elastoplast is pulled off - I grimace loudly!  But remember many a day in my early life when plasters were constantly applied, and torn off - sometimes after being soaked to ease them away ... sometimes not!


How about 'Shinplasters' ... those notes that were so worthless they were used to patch up broken skin ...


Canadian 25c "shinplaster",
front 1923

... or the quality of the paper used was so poor and worthless that with a bit of starch they could be used to make papier-mâché-like plasters to go under socks or warm shins ...


John Russell Bartlett's The Dictionary of Americanisms, defines a shinplaster as "A cant term for a bank-note, or any paper money.  It probably came into use in 1837, when the banks suspended specie payment, and when paper money became depreciated in value" ...


Canadian 25c "shinplaster",
back (1900/1923)

... it then quotes the New York Tribune in 1845: "The people may whistle for protection, and put up with what shinplaster rags they can get".



These notes were circulated by various entities ... and were often a variety of token ... sometimes used in company shop economies or peonages in place of legal tender.


So that is S for sad snippets at which you may shriek, shout, screech, squeal or squawk for Screamers and Shinplasters ... from Aspects by a British 'girl' in Canada ...


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

41 comments:

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari Om
Oh my word - that is a brilliant description for the torn trees... and had never heard of 'shinplaster', but at least the paper had some purpose, albeit not worth the print upon it! YAM xx

Anabel Marsh said...

Two new concepts for me, both intriguing.

Botanist said...

Like other commenters, both these words are new to me. I've never seen a tree felled, but the description is very sad.

Liz A. said...

I learned some new vocabulary today.

Joanne said...

Screamers - that's brilliant. I hate to know a tree has been felled. Wow - you captured "S" simply superbly. Thanks. The final stretch of A to Z awaits. Your posts have been excellent!

Elephant's Child said...

Screamers is SUCH an evocative word. And covers how this tree hugger feels beautifully.
I belong to the rip it off quickly school where elastoplast is concerned. No screaming though. Honest.
Shinplasters is new to me. Thank you.

D.G. Hudson said...

That's a new word for me as far as that definition. I've read a lot of Emily Carr's biographies, and have seen an exhibition of her early painting in the Queen Charlotte Islands, here in BC. The word screamers causes me to think of all that shouting and screaming that ancient cultures used to intimidate their opponents. . .

Hope all goes well!

David Gascoigne said...

It is really interesting that we are learning so much about our own country from you, a visitor. Thank you!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Yamini - I had to use it for my S post didn't I - and I'd never heard of Shinplaster ... but it was mentioned so again had to use it ...

@ Anabel - they just bemused me ...

@ Ian - I haven't ever seen a tree felled, but can quite understand what Emily was getting from the fellings ... 'desolate' is such a good word ...

@ Liz - yay! that's great - thank you ...

@ Joanne - I did have to use it for my S ... so great you feel the same way I do; thanks so much re the A-Z so far ...

@ EC - I couldn't resist using 'Screamers' for my S ... and as for having my plasters taken off ... I'd grimace and wait for it to happen; shinplasters bemused me as a word ...

@ DG - I haven't yet got to read the one book of hers I bought ... but did go and see the exhibition down at the local gallery and will post about it later on.

Yes - I hadn't thought about that aspect of interpreting 'screamers' when the ancient cultures tended to do it - interesting ...

@ David - thanks ... I just try and do these posts to entertain as well as educate me, you and us! Keeping everyone happy - so delighted to have your comment - thank you.

Cheers to you all - I felt this might be a post that was 'screamingly well received'! Enjoy the weekend - it's wet here - Hilary

sage said...

A great use of “S”

www.thepulpitandthepen.com

Jo said...

That description of Screamers is enough to make one cry. I too can hear the screams when trees are felled.

I didn't know that about shinplasters, interesting Hilary, thanks.

JEN Garrett said...

Shinplasters is a new word for me - an economic word that makes it all the more delicious. I can't wait for the opportunity to use it on some unsuspecting economist and see if they know the word.

Keith's Ramblings said...

I'm joining everybody else in saying I've never heard of shinplasters! Another day another lesson learned.


A-Z of My Friend Rosey!

Sue Bursztynski said...

I’ve never heard of these words before! Definitely sad to think of trees cut down... and yes, there is very much an “ouch!” when you pull off your band aid.

S Is For Seven Little Australians

https://suebursztynski.blogspot.com.au/2018/04/a-to-z-blogging-challenge-s-is-for.html

Jz said...

Wheeee!!
This is excellent stuff, Hilary!
After our Nor'easters of March, we have shards of screamers all over the place - and now I know what to call them! (And shinplaster is just plain cool.)

Deborah Weber said...

Two new words to start off my Saturday - how satisfying! Oh, but screamers - so evocative AND so heart-wrenching. This is a description I'll carry in my heart forever.

Elastoplast is a far more amusing term to my ear than our rather boring bandaid, but I imagine the discomfort they cause being removed is the same. :-)

Here's hoping shinplasters are a thing of the past.

Susan Scott said...

Those are such heart-felt words from Emily Carr Hilary - beautifully, sadly and descriptively written. I can hear and feel the scream - almost.

Ouch, re plasters of all kinds, coming off ...

Kali Delamagente said...

Once again, I am better for having dropped in to chat with you. I've never heard of 'screamers' or 'shinplasters'. what great words. I know Brits call bandaids 'plasters' which I think is a better word. Now, I'm going to wow and amaze my family with my new words.

Kim Blades said...

Hi Hilary. I agree with Emily Carr. I hate to see trees chopped down, I can imagine them screaming in agony just like we would if someone chopped off one of our limbs. Shinplasters as money - I don't know. I have a high pain thresh hold and don't mind injections, stitches or plasters being pulled off!
Another interesting informative post Hilary. Thank you.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Screamers is an apt word for those trees.
It's also the name of a 90s horror film with Peter Weller.

Lynda Dietz said...

Screamers makes me feel so bad for the trees that have fallen!

Claire Annette said...

Always happy to add new words to my vocabulary. There's an old oak tree I walk by everyday. A huge limb broke - now I'll think of it screaming when I walk past. I might have to take a new route now.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sage - thank you ...

@ Jo - the word really resonated with me when I saw it and I thought - great S ... while Shinplasters I'd had up my sleeve - so decided to just combine the two ...

@ Jen - great to see you ... and yes it's a fun term to know about - I can't imagine plastering my cuts with bank notes - but so be it ...

@ Keith - it seems it's a Canadian and perhaps American pioneering term - so I had to use it here ...

@ Sue - they're both fabulously descriptive words for their uses ... so they had to come in ...

@ Jz - yes 'Wheee' is a good word for the 'screamers' you've had dropping around you in the Nor'easters you've experienced earlier in the year ... Shinplasters was so interesting to hear about ...

@ Deborah - yes Screamers will stay with me as a word for a tree felled, or left torn open. I agree bandaid is rather 'dull' and our elastoplast is better - yet the shinplaster I hope is a thing of the past - but in some countries it could still come to the fore!

@ Susan - Emily obviously wrote really well and I have one of her books here to read ... so as you say heart-felt words by her. We had a tree fall recently in the two hours I was out ... so I didn't hear it crash down ...

@ Jacqui - that's great ... I'm glad I chose these two S words ... and I prefer our plasters too - enjoying amazing your family ...

@ Kim - Emily travelled a lot into the interior so saw the lumberjacks at work and felt the trees fall ... she certainly evokes with her descriptions. I too have a high pain threshold, but we all blanch sometimes when we've damaged ourselves ... so like you I handle it ...

@ Alex - isn't 'screamer' an apt word; thanks for the introduction to the Sci-Fi horror film - not for me as you know!

@ Lynda - I hate seeing them lying around - yet it's good for the landscape and the critters love utilising the wood, the shade, etc ...

@ Claire - thanks ... oh dear I hope I haven't put you off your walk - the old oak tree will still be with you ... its limb might have gone ... and I expect 'screamed' as it fell; enjoy your walk though ...

Cheers to you all - I thought 'Screamers' might be appreciated as a descriptive term for a tree falling ... enjoy the weekend - Hilary

Inger said...

You planted a thought. So sad about the trees.

diedre Knight said...

Hi Hilary!

Emily Carr certainly wrote with vivid eloquence! The ‘Screamers’ gave me goosebumps. Interesting notes on ‘Shinplasters’, I’d never heard the term before.

Sherry Ellis said...

I never heard those words used for fallen trees. I bet if trees could talk, they'd be screaming as they fell. (As would anything or anyone in the path of the falling tree!)

Rhodesia said...

Two words with new meanings for me, yet another educational post. Well done Hilary and have a good Sunday, Cheers Diane

Out on the prairie said...

new terms to me entirely.

Fil said...

That is such a sad description of a tree being felled - a most unusual use of the word screamer. I'll never be able to look at a tree stump the same way again ... it makes me think of the song The Maple's Lament.
Fil

Emily Bloomquist said...

Screamers seems like a perfect word for those unfortunate trees.

I am not sure what plasters (I knew them as bandaids) are made of where you are now but I am allergic to many of the ones made today. When they are pulled off, I have hives of blisters. So, I just use paper tape and gauze now. Imagining having money worth so little that people used it to patch skin is quite sad.

Emily In Ecuador

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

I have never heard of the word shinplaster before so found th is interesting

Patsy said...

Screamers are also shocking/provocatine newspaper headlines, so some destroyed trees continue to scream in their next 'life'. Maybe some even do it about deforestation and the damage we do to the natural world?

mail4rosey said...

Yeeikes, the description of the felled tree is spot on and more detailed than I'd have thought on my own. I hate to see the trees completely uprooted w/their roots and all hanging out while they are sadly on their side after a hurricane. Kicks an ouch in my being every single time.

M. Denise C. said...

So interesting, Hilary! Such violence to those trees . . .

Elsie Amata said...

Screamers is a great description. Perfectly fitting because it's what it sounded like during one of the tornadoes I went through as the trees were twisted and torn apart. Ugh!

Elsie

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Inger - it is definitely worth remembering and thinking about ...

@ Diedre - didn't she write with 'vivid eloquence' as you so describe ... Goosebumps is a good for those feelings we get - while Shinplasters ... just terrible to think about ... those times.

@ Sherry - I bet if trees could talk they'd be screaming out ... as we would in the path of a tree - I now go around keeping my ears open to groaning trees!!

@ Diane - thanks so much - good to see you ...

@ Steve - I just loved Emily's description, while the plasters ... it needed to be noted!

@ Fil - it is a desolate description for a falling tree ... and yes I walk around now looking at all the screamers; thanks for the link to The Maple's Lament ... I see what you mean from the lyrics and of course Maples are common here ...

@ Emily - it is an appropriate name for all the falling and fallen trees; plasters here look much the same as those we have in England - but I haven't bought plaster/s for years ... I think your idea of gauze and papertape makes sense ... but using something that was of value to just mop up makes one think we are lucky ...

@ Jo-Anne - that's good ...

@ Patsy - yes I guess you could call headlines screaming out on paper ... Screamers ... and the things we humans do to our natural world ...

@ Rosey - trees 'scream' whether felled naturally or by the axe - they all look so 'desolate' and forlorn ... I had to use Emily's description ...

@ Denise - just a couple of S words I rather liked ...

@ Elsie - oooh the thought of going through a tornado with the wind whipping through the trees ... twisting and turning them sounds horrific ... ugh and worse would be my words ...

Thanks so much to you all - today is Earth Day ... something else to think about for those trees ... protect our soils, so more trees can grow ... cheers Hilary

Nilanjana Bose said...

Screamers is a super-evocative word. Can't say I like trees being felled on any day...

Kristin said...

Here in Atlanta very large oak trees just fall over, roots up and all. It is frightening to watch them fall. They leave no screamers, but to see such a big tree just topple over... they say it's due to shallow roots and a drought a few years ago. Two have fallen in my yard, other's in all my neighbors yards. Sometimes they hit the houses.

Anyway, Once when I lived in Michigan, a flat wind came through during a storm and quite a few trees in the woods cracked and fell. Lots of screamers there.

When I get a shot, I hate to have them put the bandaids on because it hurts worse to have them pulled off later than the shot itself.

Sandra Cox said...

The tree screamers....so sad.

Lynn said...

The thought of a tree screaming is so sad, yet I can imagine it. I have a foot injury that made me want to scream - I can relate. :) Thank goodness for Tylenol.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nila - no I know I understand about the non-felling of trees ... though can see the logic when there are so many of them, and they help with building etc ... clearing for development is difficult always to understand ...

But 'Screamers' is just such an evocative word - I so agree ...

@ Kristin - oh gosh when a tree goes down in a storm it's so sad ... and sometimes because they're not well set with their roots ... difficult to know isn't it - and sad if they hit property ...

Oh yes, heavy winds can really do damage can't they - trees topple like nine-pins sometime ...

Plasters/Bandaids are a nuisance ... I so rarely use them - but after a shot it seems we have to have them ... mine don't last long - still might briefly stop a blood stain! Saves on the washing ...

@ Sandra - terrible thought ... screamers for a screamer ...

@ Lynn - a tree screaming isn't such a good thing is it ...

but your foot injury sounds very uncomfortable - I'm just glad it's improving ... take care ...

Cheers to the three of you - even four of you!! Can't count apparently!! Thanks for your comments and thoughts though ... Hilary