Friday, 6 July 2018

Educational Book Journey (part 1/5) ...




Where to start ... at the beginning: in this instance my arrival here in Canada, but really the A-Zs in April - my posts on subjects in Canada, and indigenous aspects that interested me ... there will be more - but I think these books are interesting and I learnt a lot - some you'll relate to others probably not so much - but I'd like them here ... I'll 'punch' these out every other day ... they go from Siberia to North America, Russia to circling the Midnight Sun ...

The book I highly recommend.


A Vancouverite suggested I read 'Vancouver' - a one book saga if ever there was one (along the lines of Michener's Alaska and Rutherford's Sarum) ... a Siberian's movement across Beringia into Alaska and down the west coast of north America ... introducing me to various myths, traditions, cultures of those early peoples ...






Little Women - the March sisters:
some of the 1994 film was filmed
in Cobble Hill.
By Louisa May Alcott




I read up on local families too - the Dunsmuirs - coal and railways on Vancouver Island; local history of Cobble Hill, where I live now; local artists Maud Lewis from the east coast (see post in February), and Emily Carr - who'd intrigued me for a while ... recommended by Deniz Bevan, a Canadian now over in Geneva.






Then came the A-Z ... starting at A for the Canadian Arctic Games ... and oh yes the extra comments, questions and queries ... as too my thought processes re what I was learning ... I felt somewhat overwhelmed - to make sense for me, let alone you.  More on these anon.


Beringia - pre glaciation
when it was possible to
walk from Siberia to
North America

I'd joined a book club ... a rather educated set of ladies, with some amazing insights into life ... I, who've never been much of a reader, nor moved in their sorts of careers - now am in the deep end ... once again: live and learn.



 So I've fluttered by the whole of the Canadian coast (and Alaska) ... touched areas of Canada ... and come across the indigenous peoples; as in Africa I'm pretty devoid of knowledge ... so some immersion dips were required ...


Emily Carr house 'restored' back to
1863 era
... Emily Carr and her artwork of the indigenous people's lands in the 1920s - her books to be read anon; ... totems - an eyelash pass so far ... so much to understand ...


Then the thrust of the group of intelligent women in this book club - that I happened to have the opportunity to be a part of, for the duration of my visit - max til Nov 2019.



So for this post ... the book 'Vancouver', and references to earlier posts.


Emily Carr - who was called 'Klee Wyck' by the indigenous people she met and painted particularly on Vancouver Island.


Maudie film - based on Maud Lewis ... seen at Cobble Hill


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

28 comments:

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi everyone - the next posts will be shorter and reference other books re the northern parts of the world ... North America, Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Scandinavia, across the Russian continent and back to Alaska ... cheers Hilary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Forgot to tick the follow up box ... now it should work and I should see comments coming in!

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
Learning a new place is always fun - and sometimes overwhelming - certainly immersive. When I stayed in Halifax for a couple of weeks two years back, one of my most favourite and enduring memories is discovering the art of Maud Lewis. I was delighted to find a couple of film clips about her, both of which undoubtedly formed a basis for the acting in the recent "Maudie" movie (which I also loved). If you are interested, the first clip and then the second clip. There is more of an insight to Everett in the second. YAM xx

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Glad it got you back into reading books.

Elephant's Child said...

I am so grateful to learn something new every day. I get most of my learning from books, but the blogosphere (you included) teaches me LOTS. Thank you.
On the comment front THIS POST told me how to get comments again. And it worked.

Sue Bursztynski said...

Oh! I wondered why I suddenly wasn’t being informed when comments came. Thanks, EC!

Liz A. said...

Sometimes it's a challenge to learn new things, but it's only painful if you're unwilling.

I guess you missed my post on how to fix the comment notification thing. (Another blogger figured it out.)

First, go into your Settings, then under Email. Delete your email from Comment Notification Email. Then Save Settings. Once that's been blanked out, reenter your email. Blogger will send you a verification, and once you've confirmed, your email notifications will be restored.

Stephen Tremp said...

Hello Hilary, I learn something new every time I stop by even though I may or may not know anything about your post. This is a good thing of course.

As always thanks for stretching the boundaries of our knowledge and culture.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Yam - thanks for those links ... I'll look later. Certainly Maud Lewis is a revelation and her story is just 'wonderful' ... I definitely enjoyed learning more.

@ Alex - I read a fair amount: 'researching' all the articles I've posted - but settling into books regularly is 'interesting'!! Good for me, I know ...

@ EC - I've learnt so much from the blogosphere ... and now am really spreading my wings - thank you so much ...

Yes I have seen how to do it - just for the moment am doing it this way, but forgot my first comment bit ... I'll change over soon ...

@ Sue - yup ... that's why ... and yes thank you to all who've told us what's going on ...

@ Liz - I know ... I do love learning ... but I did see your post and think commented on it - yet had been told another way by someone else, and then forgot the criterion when I posted today ... I'll sort it - thank you ...

@ Stephen - well that's the way it is over here - I just love having people visit! and just try and make my posts interesting ... yet thank you for saying 'I stretch the boundaries too '.....

Thanks everyone - for the help with the commenting aspect ... and for taking a little time to check the books out - cheers Hilary

Chatty Crone said...

You are way smarter than me girl - I l earn something from you each and every time.

J Lenni Dorner said...

Cool post and good idea.

I'm not sure if there are books about it, but there are three indigenous tribes in Canada who have a large percentage of their populations locked up. Reading the alleged crimes will raise your eyebrow. Not sure if that goes along with what you're hoping to learn by reading, but there you go.

Kelly Hashway/Ashelyn Drake said...

I've never been part of a book club, but I definitely like to change that some day.

Ann Bennett said...

It sounds fascinating. I'll be living it up vicariously through your explorations and insights. Happy reading.

Liza said...

I love your interest in learning and challenging yourself to do so...and, I learned from comments how to get my email notifications back. Yay!

Jacqui Murray said...

I devoured your A to Z of Canda, Hilary. I know so much more about my Northern neighbor thanks to you. I looked at Vancouver (the book)--not sure why I didn't check it out. Going to take another look.

Jo said...

There is a small documentary shown on TVO about a woman who is a "life long learner" that fits you to a T Hilary.

We recently watched a series on the indigenous peoples of the Pacific Coast, interesting group of people who have survived for thousands of years. Some of them live on Canadian Shores and some on US shores but they are all the same (but different) peoples.

Out on the prairie said...

It is a huge country with lots of tales. The first sounds like a good start, will have to see what the library has.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sandie - I seem to have got a love of learning since I started blogging ... learnt/learning so much!

@ JL - thanks ... I've picked up a few ideas on books and recently met someone with an indigenous heritage, who recommended a book to me - which is on order. I've an idea of the back story ... which is not an easy read - sadly similar to so many in other parts of the world through time. All I'll be doing is opening my eyes to various aspects and trying to understand something of today ... and that long heritage and attachment to the land ...

@ Kelly - nor have I, and I'm really enjoying it - I missed last month, but don't want to miss another ... book clubs are worth exploring ...

@ Ann - thanks so much - it is certainly interesting ... and I hope my posts match your thoughts ...

@ Liza - that's good re your email ... that was a pain not being able to get notification of comments coming in ...
I do enjoy learning more and looking into things - and now being part of a book club helps, as there's a degree of guidance from book lovers who read and review - so they know ....

@ Jacqui - thanks re the A - Z ... I enjoyed writing that up - eclectic in its take, as it was ... but certainly I learnt. Please have a read of Vancouver ... so appropriate for your present writings and recent publication ...

@ Jo - thanks ... it's only since I've been blogging have I become more curious with a huge desire to learn. Yes the indigenous peoples have been here for millennia - certainly 13,000 probably longer - yet they like all humans (and other life) have evolved ... I saw a programme on the Coastal Salish people of Vancouver Island ... but there is so much to learn and appreciate ranging over the millennia ...

@ Steve - yes there are lots of tales aren't there ... and I have been learning lots ... it is overwhelming - but I'm taking some base structural information to absorb as I stay around and can attach some of the learning to ...

Thanks so much to you all - it's great to see you and that you're interested in this journey ... take care and have good weekends - cheers Hilary

L. Diane Wolfe said...

I bet Vancouver is fascinating, going from Russia to meeting Eskimos and Indians.

Debby Gies said...

You are doing a splendid job showcasing beautiful Canada, Hilary. I suppose I should be doing some of my own reading more on my great country. Thank you. :) x

Hels said...

When my mum's 8 first cousins emigrated to Canada, they were so grateful to Canada for offering refuge, the cousins happily settled in Winnipeg as instructed. But their children, who were born in Winnipeg, moved to Vancouver for university, marriage and careers. This beautiful city is my absolute favourite!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Diane - the Vancouver book was extremely interesting and now I know more, I should read it again ...

@ Debby - thanks so much ... perhaps it's slightly easier to get to grips with than Britain! I find it difficult to know where to start ... so have been grateful for the inadvertent links I've come across ...

@ Hels - Yes Winnipeg seems to be the area most often settled by settlers and immigrants - so so cold though, not surprised the children moved westwards. It is beautiful isn't it ...

Thanks so much for visiting - lovely to see you - cheers Hilary

Nick Wilford said...

It sounds like you have a lot to delve into - hopefully the book club will go a long way to helping with that!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Nick ... there is a lot - but I ask around too - so get more information and ideas on what to read etc. The book club are well set up with their schedule for the coming months ... but it is getting me reading things I wouldn't normally read - lovely to see you here - cheers Hilary

Lynn said...

I would love to visit Vancouver Island - maybe someday.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Lynn - I still have to write up my posts about visiting Vancouver ... but the Island is one amazing place to be ... with lots of interesting areas. Thanks for coming by - Hilary

Deniz Bevan said...

Ooh, thank you for that photo of Emily Carr's house!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Deniz - yes and since I wrote the post ... I've been down and visited her house ... so photos and post to follow as soon as I can ... cheers Hilary