Friday, 26 October 2018

We Are The World Blogfest # 19: Museum of Migration ...



A dedicated Museum of Migration can be found in South-East London … where various exhibitions are put on to give us an idea, an understanding of the hows and whys migration has occurred … and still occurs.

 
-        A museum of stories and experiences …



-        No turning back for so many:  



     … 1290 AD Edict of Expulsion a royal decree issued by Edward I expelling the Jews from England … overturned during Oliver Cromwell’s Protectorate in 1657AD.

… 1607AD English colonisers set sail from London for the New World.

… 2016 and on: the start of Brexit – even today the United Kingdom is wavering.


So much emotional heartache … while reminding us as to our abilities to overcometo reach out to learn moreand importantly remember to understand


There are a number of articles on the website, while anyone in the UK can visit the Museum, events to visit and see video clips of their work …


From Wikipedia ... net migration rates - blue = positive;
orange = negative; green = stable; grey = none


… to see how we as individuals, as communities and as nations can come together to appreciate each other’s life … living peacefully with each other … the peace of many, will defeat disgruntled others …




We are all in this world … let us live in peaceful light not cross into darkness we can reach out across those barriers of intense hostility and aversion – let’s extend our hand of tranquil harmony …




We Are The World – In Darkness Be Light



We can always be positive, interested and helpful ... let's always open our hearts ... 

Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

46 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

An emphatic YES from me.
Almost all of us were migrants once. Do as you would be done by, speaks loudly to (and for) me.

Hels said...

Me too... when I went to primary school in the middle 1950s in Australia, I would say 50% of the parents came from Italy, Greece, Poland, Malta etc. Nobody wanted to leave their homelands and families, but post-WW2 there seemed to be no choice.

I hope the Museum of Migration in South-East London analyses why families leave their old homelands but also the huge contribution they make to their new homelands.

Joanne said...

If only folks could truly walk a mile in the immigrant's shoes, then maybe there could be more understanding. We can only hope. You are preaching to the choir. Good post and message.

Janie Junebug said...

Yet another museum I'd love to visit.

Love,
Janie

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
As a migrant myself, am always interested in this. In OZ we have many museums paying homage to migration... but one of the most profound experiences I had at such a place was Pier 21 in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Most of the world forget it came about purely because people moved on to find better pastures. YAM xx

Liz A. said...

Considering that they figure that humans first came about in Africa, all of our ancestors started out somewhere else. It's fascinating to see what forces moved us so that we ended up where we are.

Chatty Crone said...

I would love to visit and study that museum - I love learning about all that.

D.G. Hudson said...

Since you mention migrations, when hubs and I had our ancestry done, we saw that both our ancestors (the British and Scottish ones) came over in two migrations, one that went to the southern US and the other that went to New York and then upwards to Canada.

Interesting information, Hilary!

Rhodesia said...

I seem to have done my share of migration from the UK to Rhodesia, to RSA, on to Bophuthatswana (which does not exist anymore) back to RSA, then the UK and finally ending up in France!!!
Still working on the computer and trying to get back to normal, whatever that is.
Take care and have a good weekend Diane

Susan Scott said...

We were all once migrants - lovely post Hilary reminding us of this.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Most people in our country came from migrants.

Lynda Dietz said...

What an interesting-sounding museum. We always need to remember that we're talking about people, not statistics.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I worked alongside people who came from all over the world, all with their own reasons for being in England. I enjoyed the company of them all.

Jacqui Murray said...

That's a nice memory. We are a land of immigrants which makes us richer and more tolerant. Thanks for this.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC - thank you ... we are all migrants aren't we when those roots are traced back - and day to day I'm sure we all mix with many ...

@ Hels - yes: Me Too - I imagine in the 50s many conscripts from the War, refugees and recuperating service people were in Australia - as you say no choice.

There a lot of leaders amongst the Museum's members and trustees ... so I'm sure all kinds of research will be carried out ... both as to why they left and as to how they settled in to their new lands ...

@ Joanne - yes we should all walk a mile in an immigrant's shoes and we might glean some understanding. I'm delighted to know I am preaching to a choir ... thank you ...

@ Janie - I must visit when I return ...

@ Yam - yes you have travelled and it's good to know that there are similar museums in Australia. Thank you for letting us know about the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Halifax, Nova Scotia - I'm putting the link here ... https://pier21.ca/home for anyone interested. And yes when people travelled we all were looking for pastures new ...

@ Liz - Africa was a major route of migration ... but it seems they also came from other places ... until homo sapiens became the dominant member of the human race today ...

@ Sandie - so much to learn from their site by the look of it ... and it's great you love that sort of learning ...

@ DG - it's interesting to find out where you both came from ... and ended up where you are now together. It is fascinating as we can learn so much today ...

@ Diane - yes you have done some migration ... I only did two - the South Africa bit ... but can see why people move ... and now it's often job opportunities that lure us ...

Good luck with sorting the 'dreaded machine' and its contents out ... and normal - what is that ...

@ Susan - we were once ... but our roots call too ...

@ Alex - yes most Americans came from another land ...

@ Lynda - yes we should be talking people and having conversations with them ... not statistics ...

@ John - like you I've also worked around many nationalities and always enjoyed their stories, and company - excellent comment ...

@ Jacqui - lands of migrants are more tolerant and definitely are richer in knowledge and understanding ...

Thanks so much to you all for being here - and it's great if we can encourage others to mix and join with those around us ... cheers Hilary

Out on the prairie said...

I think we all forget being immigrants, and need to work more at getting along

Anabel Marsh said...

I hadn’t heard of that museum before, it sounds interesting. We are a nation built on immigrants and always have been. There is much to celebrate in that.

Botanist said...

I guess we're part of the migration statistics too :) That map is interesting. Many of the areas of migration come as no surprise, but I was intrigued to see Russia as a net inflow, for example.

Debby Gies said...

Beautiful share and good reminder, especially in these times Hilary. <3

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

Sounds very interesting. People spout off about so many things but a truth they often ignore is that all our ancestors were migrated from somewhere else either because they were forced out or because they were searching for something better.

Vallypee said...

Today, I was talking to my daughter about ancient migrations. In this case, it was possible refugee migrations from Europe to the Uk in Saxon times. Rather than the invasion that is usually portrayed, it's possible those arriving in England from Europe then were refugees...as many have said here, migration is part of human history...I love your message!

Gail M Baugniet - Author said...

Thank you Helen for drawing attention to this: We are all in this world … let us live in peaceful light.
My genealogy research details ancestors of all family branches migrating from Europe, Ireland, and France-to-Quebec, Canada. I've written about their decisions, made through hardship, to emigrate - simple stories about lives of ordinary people. That is who we are, members of a world in which you ask that we live in peaceful light.

Patsy said...

It's odd how many people see migration and migrants as being a problem, just because they don't now live in the place where they were born – yet how many of us do?

troutbirder said...

Well done Hilary.. I was surprised about Cromwell though....:)

D Biswas said...

We need more such museums, and more people should visit them.

Thanks for being such a consistent part of the WATWB family!

Damyanti

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Steve - yes we should remember we're all immigrants somewhere way back, yet now we all get on so easily ... and should make more effort at getting on with everyone today - I so agree with you ...

@ Anabel - it's relatively new, but I must visit when I return. We are a nation built on immigrants seen so well in our history and as you so rightly say we should celebrate them all ...

@ Ian - yup ... you and your family definitely are part of those stats. Now you highlight Russia ... I'd just been looking for an additional graphic to put in ... so am glad I used this one: but you're right and one wonders why ...

According to the pic's details the info on Russian immigration comes from the CIA Factbook (2017 data) ...

@ Debby - it is a museum I've been wanting to highlight for a while ... and I'm sure it'll appear again as a post once I've visited (whenever that might be ... )

@ Susan - exactly ... many probably don't even know where they came from - yet I just wish we could all give others credit for having the guts to move to another country ... and I know I'd really struggle in a country where I didn't speak the language, nor understood their customs ...

@ Val - interesting co-incidence you were having that discussion with your daughter ... and aren't we all a refugee from somewhere - even running away from ourselves til we actually settle down. As you so rightly say migration is our human history ... thank you ...

@ Gail - yes I do just wish we could give everyone a chance ... it'd make life so much happier for one and all: "We are all in this world .. let us Live in Peaceful Light". Lovely adaption of the blogfest's tagline ... thank you ...

As you say migration was to get away and to hope for a better life once the initial hardship was overcome ... for themselves as well as their offspring ... us: who are lucky enough to live in a relatively peaceful light ... which should be available for all ...

@ Patsy - well exactly ... we should welcome them, embrace their customs and encourage them to embrace ours and our language; I'm sure I came from some other place ...

@ Troutbirder - thanks ... I too was surprised about Cromwell - that's why I put that stat in ...

@ Damyanti - I wonder how many such museums there are ... but I'll definitely visit this one once I return to England.

It's a pleasure being part of this community - and I have to get round to visit the other entries ... cheers from a very wet evening on Vancouver Island - Hilary

K.L. Allendoerfer said...

Thanks for sharing this! We need a museum like this in the United States. There may be one (or more) but I don't know about it. My husband is a recent immigrant. Without it, my family wouldn't exist!

Sandra Cox said...

I didn't realize Jewish persecution went so far back.
I never expected to see, especially in my own country, what is going on today in the free world.

Inger said...

Wish we could forward this to our president!!! I haven't written about this, but it is not always easy for me to be a migrant, one who looks just right for the US, blond, blue eyed and all those totally unimportant attributes, one with just the right religious background, and so on. I don't feel guilty about having had it easy, but I do feel sad and angry about what's happening to so many others.

RO said...

Such a powerful and much needed message and I thank you! Hugs...RO

Nilanjana Bose said...

Timely message. All of our forefathers were migrants from Africa...I haven't been to this particular museum, must check it out next time...

T. Powell Coltrin said...

A great post and so meaningful. As you may well have heard, the U.S.'s current president wants to basically shut off the flow of immigrants to our country. He says it's for safety. He says it's because of finances. I'm saddened by this. I can't even imagine trying to flee a country because of horrible and dangerous conditions just to have the door slammed in my face by a possible host country. I love my country and don't blame others for wanting to live here.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Karen - I know ... this has only been established a few years ... but I feel it'll offer a very comprehensive view of migration over the years; and I'm sure will be doing some analysis. I know many families wouldn't exist as parents and families migrated at different times in their lives ...

@ Sandra - I had forgotten about Edward 1's Edict of Expulsion ... but it's a timely reminder that history does continue - though I'd have thought and had hoped we lived in a happier world in the 21st C - it's worrying what's happening ...

@ Inger - well I don't normally touch on this sort of subject - but the Museum and this particular blogfest seemed an opportunity to let readers know about the Museum and what it offers. I feel very lucky to have been born into a free country and have freedom of speech and travel ... I just hope we have leaders who can sympathetically help all in this world ...

@ RO - thanks ... very pleased you were happy to read ...

@ Nila - yes many of us are mostly migrants from somewhere else; I'm glad you'll check the Museum out next time you're in London ...

@ Teresa - I have been following what's been going on ... and just wish all leaders could empathetically help everyone and resolve these crises, and let everyone live happily and economically viably in their own country: I sincerely hope.

Thank you so much for visiting. reading and commenting on this post ... I look forward to seeing this museum and understanding more ... thank you - Hilary

Susan Kane said...

Very true.

1290 AD expulsion of Jews by Edward 1...so meaningful after the slaughter of Jewish attendees in their synagogue in Philadelphia.

Life is too short to promote and act upon any religious group, to hate any race or culture, to reject and care for those in need.

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Joanne was right. You ARE preaching to the choir. It's heartening to read the comments here and see that everyone is pretty much in agreement.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan - yes when I wrote the post the Pittsburgh shootings hadn't occurred ... I had not realised Edwards 1 had issued that Edict over 700 years ago ...

Life is most definitely too short to harbour hate in any form ... as you so rightly say ...

@ Susan - yes we are a great bunch of blogging friends in this community - I count myself very lucky ...

Thanks so much to the two of you for coming by and commenting - I must visit the museum when I get back ... cheers Hilary

Kelly Hashway/Ashelyn Drake said...

Sounds like a great museum.

Sandra Cox said...

World peace would be a wonderful thing, wouldn't it.

Keith's Ramblings said...

Your message is one most embrace, it's just sad we all don't. A thought-provoking piece Hilary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Kelly - I'm sure it'll be very interesting ... I'm looking forward to my visit when I can get there ...

@ Sandra - World Peace and freedom for all would be just wonderful ...

@ Keith - yes I know most of us want to live in harmony with all around us ... and if we see a post on such a museum we must wonder about refugees ...

Cheers and thanks for visiting ... Hilary

Sherry Ellis said...

Wonderful post! We need to be tolerant of everyone. Just about everyone here is a descendant of an immigrant.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Sherry - we certainly do need to be tolerant and gentle ... and yes we all came a-wandering in to our respective countries - somewhere along the line of centuries past ... good to see you - cheers Hilary

Eric Lahti said...

Yes! Immigrants are not the enemy no matter how many times people try to spin them that way. They've become a convenient target for incompetent politicians, but most immigrants just want what everyone else wants: food, shelter, safety, and a few bucks in their pockets.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Eric - and immigrants in the main want to help others too ... we seem to be in a pickle at the start of this century ... I hope sincerely we can welcome others ... treat others humanely and be empathetic to others in need - we need leaders ... fortunately some young ones are coming through and will appear from the angst that so many leaders are creating at the moment ... very soon I hope. Good to see you and thanks for coming by - Hilary

DMS said...

I agree- let's open our hearts. When we trace our roots most of us came from somewhere else. Beautiful post and what a fascinating museum. Thanks for sharing.
~Jess

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Jess - it is important to open our hearts every and all day ... our lineage is so interesting. I'm looking forward to getting up to see the Museum on my return ... so pleased you were happy to know about this Museum - cheers Hilary