Sunday, 11 November 2018

Remembrance Day … 100 years after WW1 ended …




A lot has and will be written about the 100th anniversary of that dreadful time in our history … I am going along the same route with a slightly different emphasis …





On Victoria’s harbour front are moving memorials to Canada’s War Veterans … while we also find a Peace Garden …





The Homecoming Statue ...
Inspired by Gratitude



In honour of all veterans, all peoples damaged by war, their families … the women, children, elderly, newborns … us – their futures … we will care for all in this world wherever we will find them. 







We should remember mother earth … the environment and all that inhabits it – also often severely damaged or destroyed by war … 





I am wondering, as I never asked – funny how these questions come to us too late – why my mother went into caring in the latter half of her life (as it happens for the elderly – she was highly respected) … and whether it was because of the loss she experienced as a child, in WW2 and the subsequent overwhelming grief.





Remembrance - may we never forget





Let PEACE be amongst us … and be their memorial to our future …







Should you want a succinct post on the Armistice 1918 - please read Mike's A Bit About Britain article ...


and another very appropriate post by Sarah Zama on 'The War to End all Wars' - the 1920s period ... where the Great War began to colour so many things in Europe ... 


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

37 comments:

Hels said...

The statue of the returning soldier being welcomed by his family still moves me to tears. I can imagine the delight and the relief.

Elephant's Child said...

So much pain, so much loss.
Lest we forget.
And yes, let PEACE be amongst us. Today and always.

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari Om
there have been many wonderful (is that the right word?) films and documentaries this year covering the 14-18 conflict from all angles in order to try and convey something of the enormity and the effects and consequences... and fine as they are, none can truly give those of us who have benefitted from peace a full understanding. It has, though, brought the 'small generations' a better picture of history and - with hope - a desire that no such thing again occurs. Oh, the hope... YAM xx

B Pradeep Nair said...

Hi Hilary,
Thanks for the link to the Armistice article.
So many lives were lost, families devastated, and places destroyed. It was a catastrophe of unimaginable proportions.
According to one estimate, over one million men left India for foreign lands to take part in the war as a part of Britain. Of them, at least 74,000 lost their lives.
To know more, this article might help.
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bengaluru/the-indian-soldier-in-a-foreign-field/articleshow/66570087.cms

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Sadly war touches everyone in some fashion.

Jz said...

Wouldn't it be lovely to believe that could never happen again...?

Jacqui Murray said...

Such a wonderful honor to Canada. Thank you for this, Hilary.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Hels - it was a very emotive statue ... I wish I'd been able to get a better photo - but others were 'in the way' ... and yes to know your loved one has come back - such relief ...

@ EC - you're so right ... it was a dreadful time and we somehow have to help bring PEACE into the world: that lasts and shows what humanity can do for itself ...

@ Yam - yes I'm sure there have been lots of films and documentaries of those times ... I saw quite a few as the 2014 start of the War occurred those 100 years ago. I'll catch up when I get back to the UK. We have been lucky to have been able to benefit from those who fought for our free lives ... and like you 'the hope' that there will be no more wars - and leaders can rise to the fore to help us bring Peace to the world.

@ Pradeep - the Armistice article is excellent. I saw an excellent documentary and heard a BBC radio series on the Commonwealth soldiers who fought in the Great War by one of our historians - David Olusoga ... who has contributed greatly to informing us more about those times. The Africans and Indians formed most of the talk I listened to ... and yes over 70,000 lives were lost ...
Thank you for the link over to the India Times - I'll take a look.

@ Alex - yes you're right ... war does touch everything within its arena ...

@ Jz - oh yes ... if only we could get politicians and leaders to direct their actions in the direction of curtailing war ...

@ Jacqui - there will be many posts ... so I thought as I was here - something for Canada would be appropriate ...

I just sincerely hope that we do not have another world war - we need leaders and politicians to be able to stand up, guide us and keep us in a peaceful world ... thank you for being here and commenting - Hilary

DMS said...

A beautiful post and tribute. Sadly- so many lives are impacted by war. Here is to peace!
~Jess

Botanist said...

Powerful reminders. And thank you for the link to the other article. That was very insightful.

Lisa said...

Lovely photos in honor of this anniversary. It doesn't seem like yesterday, but it also doesn't seem like it was 100 years ago, either. I, too wish peace was this war's legacy, but it doesn't look like it. To have had two world wars seems like that would be enough. But evidently not. Violence and the threat of war always seem to hang over us. Maybe it's the only way to keep us from over populating the planet. Thank you for this post. It is meaningful to never forget.

Sue Bursztynski said...

Thanks for sharing, Hilary! Unfortunately I can’t see two of your three photos, not sure why, but the link is very interesting, I’ll have to read it properly later today.

Nick Wilford said...

A short but thought-provoking post. I wonder what the next 100 years will bring us. We're not living in peace yet, but maybe one day.

Truedessa said...

I think we need to remember in the hopes of not repeating history in forgetfulness.

Sandra Cox said...

I love that first picture.
Let us not forget...

Debby Gies said...

Such a poignant post with the blatant truth Hilary. <3

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Jess - a simple post - thank you. As you say lives are still impacted and as we continue using guns and/or chemicals, war will be difficult to stop ... here is to peace - as you say ...

@ Ian - thanks ... Mike writes very intelligent down-to-earth articles ... so I'm glad you're going over to look ...

@ Lisa - thank you ... glad the photos showed up. It certainly doesn't seem 100 years ago ... considering I've lived through many of those decades. Yes I rather hoped after the Millennium life for everyone would improve ... greed and selfishness seem to be ruling. Certainly the undeserving populations seem to bear the brunt of war. It is essential that we don't forget ...

@ Sue - not sure why the photos didn't appear - possibly a blip in connectivity ... three of them are my photos and the other is via Wiki - so nothing unusual there. Glad you popped over to see Mike and his article, Sarah's is very interesting re the European take ...

@ Nick - for me it was short. Wouldn't it be interesting to see what happens in the next 100 years ... I could probably understand that period, after that I'd be lost - way too much technology going on ... I do hope we can get to peace ...

@ Truedessa - there's so much to follow through from both the Wars and those in between - we just somehow need to live peacefully and understand more ...

@ Sandra - that's a Wiki image of the poppies over Lake Geneva, Montreux - the United Nations property I think ...

@ Debby - thank you ... the service men of all services deserve our heartfelt thanks ... but so too do all those impacted by war ... people, animals and the earth ...

Thanks to you - we will remember and we all will encourage everyone to care, love and heal any ills ... here's to peace - Hilary

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

I reckon those people a hundred years ago wouldn't have imagined that remembrance day would still be so important a hundred years later

Joanne said...

if only every battlefield were a peace garden instead...
Good post and just sad for so many lost in battle and for the reasons given for war. For all those brave enough to serve - wow.

Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe said...

No matter the horror, no matter the carnage, war continues to be the norm.

Lynda Dietz said...

I have the utmost respect for those who are willing to serve their country to protect strangers. Your post was moving. Thank you.

Rhodesia said...

We had a very poignant service here at our local village. Every name on the monument for our area is read out and nobody is forgotten. Take care Diane

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Jo-Anne - I'm sure they couldn't even imagine what life would be like now ... I certainly am not at all sure I can imagine what life will be like in 2100 ... I would like to though!

@ Joanne - what a good thought ... the cemeteries have turned out to be just that - peaceful places. We could do without any more battlefields ever anywhere ... it'd be wonderful if we could all live in peace. As you say many have been so incredibly brave to serve ...

@ Arleen - unfortunately your thought appears to be right ... if only the balance could tip the peaceful route ...

@ Lynda - I agree ... it is just wonderful people want to look after us and let us live our lives in peace. Thank you ... I wanted to include people we so often forget the families, communities, animals and mother earth ...

@ Diane - I remember that from previous years ... the French village that will never forget their own, or I'm sure others who were part of village life ...

We will remember them, and that time of horror ... who hoped we would forever live in peace in the years to come after their suffering ... thank you. Hilary

Out on the prairie said...

We had a few ceremonies yesterday, always proud to partake in. I always wish I could get everyone to stop the wars, but it never has happened for very long.

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

Such a poignant post, Hilary, and important reminder.

That statue of the homecoming is just beautiful.

Janie Junebug said...

I wish I could have been in Paris for the ceremony. Thank you for reminding us that this is the 100th year. The suffering during WWI was horrible. I can't imagine being in the trenches with the rats. Of course, as in all wars, civilians suffer, too.

Love,
Janie

Chatty Crone said...

Veterans, war, peace, freedom - all necessary for freedom. I appreciate all veterans. We are blessed.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Steve - yes here too. My thoughts too turn to stopping wars before they start ...

@ Elizabeth - the statue 'Homecoming' reminds us of the joy, the waiting and the potential sadness. It is so important to remember ...

@ Janie - I'd have liked to have been watching the French ceremony - it was an important time for us to all remember. As you mention the horrors of being a service man must have been just dreadful and terrifying ... and yes, civilians suffer too ...

@ Sandie - we are fortunate people will serve their country and be prepared to suffer for it ...

Thank you for being here and remembering on this, probably the most important, date in our history: the end of the Great War ... we need to remember what they did for us all those years ago. Hilary

bazza said...

I was staying with a friend in northern France over the weekend and was lucky enough to take part in a local remembrance parade. There are plenty of memorials to Canadian forces in that part of the world.
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s serpentine Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Liz A. said...

It's too bad you didn't think to ask your mother that question when she was around. But, in our youth, we don't think of all the questions that occur to us later.

Christine Rains said...

Let us not forget. Growing up, I went to the Remembrance Day parade every year. My Grandad always marched in it, and my mom, now part of the Legion Ladies Auxiliary, marches in it still. I still have Canadian poppies I wear every year.

Kelly Steel said...

So sad. Such pain.
Lest we forget.
They will be remembered.

Pat Hatt said...

Have to remember indeed. War touches everyone, sadly.

diedre Knight said...

The returning soldier statue is so touching. I love the idea of a Peace Garden. There should be one in every city worldwide as permanent reminders to "Never Forget" so as not to repeat ourselves.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Bazza - that must have been so memorable and evocative ... I remember when I researched the Commonwealth graves I realised the cemeteries had been established for each country ... and the Canadians were there in both the Wars ...

@ Liz - I know ... there are now lots of questions I'd like to ask ... but too late now - sadly ...

@ Christine - I remember them from my school days and then later once I'd left home ... it's excellent your mother still marches in the Legion - it sets an example to the children ... I now wonder what the difference is between Canadian poppies and the ones we use in England ...

@ Kelly - you've captured the essence of the times and of the Remembrance Day ...

@ Pat - we do have to remember and to be extremely grateful for all that has been done for us in the 21st century ...

@ Diedre - the sculpture is, as you mention, so so touching ... one can feel their emotion.

The little Peace Garden is on the edge of the Harbour facing the Government buildings ... and that's a good idea - a Peace Garden in each city, town, suburb, village ... where quiet can reign ..

Thanks so much to you all for visiting - Remembering all who have been touched by War is so important when we lead our lives today ... with thoughts - Hilary

Deniz Bevan said...

I wish we learned from history more often.
I was hoping to attend the service at the Canadian Embassy but couldn't make it out, so we watched the London one on the BBC.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Deniz - oh I so agree, we really do need to learn to live with each other and in peace. The London Remembrance Service is always really well done - and now I'm back in the UK - and with a tv - I'll be able to keep up a little more. I'm sorry you missed the actual Service at the Embassy ... but I used to watch these sorts of events with my mother and it was always rewarding just being with her for those occasions in her latter years. Thanks for the comment - cheers Hilary