Tuesday, 26 March 2019

Caryatids at Pitzhanger Manor; but not at King’s Observatory …




Well I’d no idea what a ‘caryatid’ was … but picked up the name as I went on a tour of one of our local Eastbourne theatres – then the Saturday Times had an article on Pitzhanger Manor, Ealing, London … where caryatids were mentioned.



Caryatid displayed in
the British Museum


The way things seem to happen in this learning world of ours – well it does to me … once one hears about something, then it keeps popping its head above the parapet.






Sir John Soane c 1800
portrait by Thomas Lawrence



Sir John Soane (1753 – 1837) used the Manor as a sort of laboratory to develop his architectural ideas.  Sir John was a son of a bricklayer, who rose to the top-most heights of his profession …






… as professor of architecture at the Royal Academy, and an official architect to the Office of Works – the English Royal Households castles and residences overseer.

Bank of England facade 1818-1827
with a facade of caryatid columns

His design of the Bank of England, soon after destroyed by fire, set the tone for commercial architecture;  


Dulwich Picture Gallery
Interior


Dulwich Picture Gallery was a major influence in the planning of subsequent art galleries and museums.  





Soane Museum

The main legacy – his home in Lincoln’s Inn Fields, was designed to display the art works and architectural artefacts that he collected during his lifetime – is described in the Oxford Dictionary of Architecture as “one of the most complex, intricate, and ingenious series of interiors ever conceived”.





I feel like I probably should be a caryatid at the moment – I’m like a static person holding up numerous tendrils of learning – attending lots of classes, giving some talks, going to films by the dozen, being round and about with the encumbent mashed brain trying to remember where and when I’m doing what …on the other hand I've no wish to be turned to stone!




Caryatid Building, Madrid
… to add to myself insulting me … ‘my bus’ decided to do a funny on me:  I don’t usually take the bus, as I can walk from town quite happily … but felt like a ride back on Saturday …


… there are two of ‘my buses’ one goes round via the theatres and thence to my stop, the other goes up the hill to the Eastbourne village of Meads, round the top and back down to my stop – I got this one …




Pitzhanger Manor - front entrance
(with caryatid pillars)

… I was minding my own business – enjoying the view as I took the long route home – but hey ho, fiddle dee dee  … the bus went straight back to town to ‘dump me’ where I’d got on --- I then walked home, which obviously I should have done forty minutes earlier!!  Ridiculous life?!





Pitzhanger Manor library c1802

Enough of the wobbling chit-chat … Pitzhanger Manor has just reopened, having been refurbished – and looks a great place to visit …




Circle and Upper Circle, Devonshire Park Theatre Eastbourne
… as is another restored rather magnificent building: King’s Observatory, Richmond … which has a telescope observatory on the roof.  Both of which are now on my list of ‘to see’ places … I guess I need a TBS list: to be seen!






Looking out from the Theatre bar towards the
refurbishing of the Devonshire Park Tennis Centre
(the area is almost ready for the 2019 season - after much
redevelopment of the area, including the Congress Theatre -
a 1963 (I'd say) brutalist building! which has been restored)

Ah well … I’m failing … but I’ll write about the Theatre another day … my head needs to get into gear … so for April I’ll be gathering those tendrils of brain (if possible) – but will continue with the #WATWB (We are the World Blogfest) posts at the end of the month and will do WEP – see my side bar … but not the A-Z Challenge …




Ionic Entablature
engraving c/o Wiki
So this static caryatid person with an entablature on her head full of who knows what … is signing off …

 If any of you can make head or tail of this post = well done is all I can say … but something got written!  Caryatid is the key … 

I’ll be around … vaguely probably – thank goodness it’s getting lighter and I’ve six months to get myself into gear while the longer days are around.


The restored King’s Observatory post

Pitzhanger Manor – via Wiki

My post mentioning Eleanor Coade 

An immediate addendum to this post about the King's Observatory ... a simultaneous posting by the Royal Society refers to the Observatory ... gives more details, shows more, mentions the Transit of Venus, and talks clocks - the subject of the post ... no caryatids though!


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

49 comments:

David M. Gascoigne, said...

Good morning Hilary: Am I pointing out that I am an oddity since I did know what a caryatid is, not that I have ever used the term as far as I know. After all one does not see them every day; they are not generally the hot topic at cocktail parties and soirées. I expect that any day now you will be finding suitable rainments in which to garb yourself, and, striking appropriate pose, provide all of your dear readers with a 21st century version of a caryatid, and perhaps you will be embarking on a whole new career as a model for enterprising young sculptors. It will be modern classical at its finest.

A Heron's View said...

To be a caryatid: an architectural term for a column in the shape of a woman.
I have met and known several real women who would consider themselves to have a similar disposition to that of a caryatid, feeling themselves burdened by the heavy loads of commerce and life.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ David - well birds obviously teach you other things!! I'd never come across the term - being not a birder, nor an art or architectural student - but the learning I enjoy - and seeing your birds. I suspect you're having a bad dream with those ideas!! The thought is a little horrifying though - mind you the dressing up box at the Theatre is fairly near. But not my scene ... I'm a retiring kinda person (usually).

But I'm delighted educated readers are here ... lovely to see you and to have that comment.

@ Mel - yup ... and an atlas, I gather, is the term for a man! I'm sure there are many women out there, who are as you describe ... though I thank my lucky little soul I'm not one of them ... just for the time being in a rut of life ...

A General Addition to the post: As I posted this - the Royal Society put up details on the King's Observatory, clocks, and more - it's a great read and one I recommend ... enjoy. Talk about synchronicity ... ?!

Cheers and thanks so much to you all - who can wander through this post! Have a lovely week ... it is warmer here and we have some sun - it's been gloomy on the coast .... Hilary

Joanne said...

you outdid yourself on vocabulary in this post. I had the dictionary close at hand. And I'm ready to join you for the tour of all things To Be Seen. Let's plan some lunch too!

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Interesting. To create a style that would last...
Sorry you took a really long bus ride for nothing.

bazza said...

If Sir John Soane was the son of a bricklayer he could have reached those heights by becoming a hod-carrier. Jusy sayin'
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s powerfully pervasive Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Chatty Crone said...

Hilary I had no idea what it was. You are way above my learning. I do love reading and learning though.

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
hehe, I kinda know where you 'are at' today, as am now on sleeps countdown to departure for OZ (eight...) and feel totally all at odds with myself!

I have seen items referred to as caryatids on various antiques shows that the BBC produces and on all five occasions that I recall, they were made of wood, not stone; however, the principle of being architectural 'women' for support of things above them was there.

While am not officially taking part in A-Z this year due to the trip, I have decided still to utilise the system in order to keep posts going over at Wild YAM. I have been scheduling quite a few and the rest will be done 'on the run'... hopefully! YAM xx

quietspirit said...

Hilary: Thank you for this post. I learned something from it I didn't know. The term, caryatids, is not one that I had run across before.

L. Diane Wolfe said...

I didn't know there was a specific name for that type of column. Is it pronounced like it's spelled?

Anabel Marsh said...

Caryatid - a new term to me too. You live and learn!

Out on the prairie said...

I have ridden that misguided bus but ended up taking a taxi home after ending up in parts unknown. It was amusing to the driver and very profitable for him after I felt the bus would save us some money. I used him for the next few days and enjoyed his advice and superior knowledge of the area.

Liz A. said...

So, what is a caryatid? I didn't figure it out. (We can blame it on my migraine, though. I'm a bit dense at the moment.)

Sandra said...

Well I had to go look up caryatid. You just added to my vocabulary, Hilary.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

That's no way to treat a lady!

How is it that we get by for years thinking that buildings are just made up of floors, walls, doors, windows etc and then we read a book about architecture and this opens up a whole new world of porticos, tympana, colonnades and, yes, caryatids?

Sir John Soane designed an absolutely stunning room at Wimpole Hall, just down the road from me.

Kathy G said...

Thank you for the information and education today.

Kay G. said...

You MUST tell me which theatre in Eastbourne! I will go to see it and think of you!

mail4rosey said...

I have a TBS list too. I think we should start a club. :) :)

Botanist said...

Well, I'd heard of the word caryatid, but couldn't have told you what it was ... until now :)

Marja said...

Ah a beautiful column that is I can't remember having seen a column in the shape of a woman. Love it though You seem to have an interesting life: Classes, talks and movies Enjoy Would have loved to hear you talk as you must have so much knowledge Take care

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Joanne – I’d never heard the word … now I’ll never forget it! Sounds an excellent idea to join a To Be Seen places club and then have lunch after or during! Will definitely join you …

@ Alex – Soane’s ideas and designs have stood the test of time. I’m not quite sure what happened re the bus … because I’ve done the journey since and it dropped me where I expected – i.e. near home! Maybe the Saturday routes are different … I’ll find out sometime …

@ Bazza – yes he could of just carried on being a hod-carrier couldn’t he … I’m just glad he moved on and let his brains do the drawing!

@ Sandie – well … I just had to look it up, didn’t I - and then felt it was an interesting enough word for a post … or a waffle around various subjects! Glad you enjoyed the notes on it …

@ Yam – I’m a headless chicken and really have no reason for it. If I had eight sleeps til I left for down under I’d be doing my nut?!?! I just simply hadn’t heard the word before … and yes I think they can be made of wood, stone, or sculpted specifically … probably more as decorative pieces … though I could write another post to qualify the term … I’ll see!
Good for you doing the A-Z … I’ve just decided I need to opt out …

@ Cecelia – that’s good … there’s just so much about architecture that I don’t know – but it was a fun word to find out about …

@ Diane – I think it’s pronounced as it’s spelt – Cary -atid – at least that’s the way I’m thinking about it! I should be able to tell using the notations in Wiki – but am not sure how they work …

@ Anabel – I expect there are lots of caryatids in and around Glasgow – you’ll see them all over the place now … yes I live and learn that’s for sure …

@ Steve – I didn’t disappear into the sunset with my bus journey I’m glad to say! Yours sounds like a fun time. The driver seems like a fine fellow – and yes if you can tap into local knowledge – it does make life easier and more informative …

@ Liz – no worries … I’m sure it’s the migraine. “It is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on her head.” My first image shows it perfectly …

@ Sandra – oh I’m pleased to know that … caryatid as a word is also now embedded in my grey cells!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ John – you’re right there … but you should see the men! I still know nothing about architecture (sad, but true) – just this word stood out. But looks like I’ve opened the door to more occasional posts on architectural terms …

Interesting to read John Soane designed one of the rooms at Wimpole Hall – that would be fascinating to see … I note it’s just south-west of Cambridge. Wimpole Hall has an interesting history in its own right … must be lovely.

@ Kathy – it’s a pleasure! My round-about way of educating myself.

@ Kay – it’s the Devonshire Park … but the tours only happen occasionally.

@ Rosey – sounds like a really great idea … A To Be Seen list and a club – Joanne would like to join in too … a blogging group is an enticing thought!

@ Ian – I’m sure this was the first time I’d heard the term – but the chap said it in a garbled way … and it was only when I read the article on Pitzhanger Manor that I knew how it was spelt and thus verbalised – which then led to this post … life is strange!

@ Marja – I expect we’ve all seen them … but not realised what they were. I probably should do another post – because there’s more … later on! I like to fill my days and seem to have got into the learning curve of life – never having been there before … so lots going on. My talks aren’t about what’s on the blog … I give history talks – and struggle … but my way of presenting seems to be enjoyed … the blog methodology (and knowledge) certainly helps.

Thanks so much to you all for being here – and I’m so pleased ‘caryatid’ has interested many of you … cheers Hilary

Fil said...

Every day's a school day as someone once said to me here and that's what I feel reading your posts Hilary :) always something new to learn - I love the sound of caryatid ... great word .

How exciting to watch Eastbourne getting ready for the tennis season too and the Observatory would definitely be on my list of places to see as well.
Glad the night's are getting brighter - looking forward to a lovely summer once all the B rubbish gets out of our heads.

Deborah Barker said...

Ah, a caryatid - um, don't think I knew that! I chuckled at your bus ride though. My elder sister and I boarded a train for Southend one summer's day, and did not know that the front two carriages were the only ones going all the way to the station. We were in carriage three and had been shunted off to the sidings before we realised. Embarrassing if funny, as we shuffled off and had to walk along the track back to the station.
Another entertaining post, thank you Hilary :-)

Jacqui Murray said...

The epitome for a teacher is to inspire Lifetime Learners. You are my poster child for that, Hilary. I am enthralled by the joy you find in so many new bits of information.

Lisa said...

Sometimes I like to jump on a bus just to cruise, and see life going by as I sit and let someone else drive. Caryatid, I had no idea what that was, so thank you for the lesson! Right off the bat I knew this post was going to be amusing, and it was, as usual. You sound so busy. I wish I could come and visit your TBS places, too!

Sherry Ellis said...

I learned something new. I didn't know there was a proper name for a stone woman column. Very interesting!

Deborah Weber said...

I'm charmed by your post Hilary. I often dream about a ruined temple with a smattering of caryatids about- I don't think it's an actual landmark but it certainly feels like an internal one. And I sometimes wonder about those "women" - if they wish they weren't so anchored, or whether they are simply moving at a pace so much slower than we can perceive and are actually having a most wonderful time of it all.

You "scenic route" bus ride made me smile in clear recognition. I am quite directionally dyslexic and often head the wrong way.

Sounds like a delightful time for you rich with experiences and soaking in.

Debbie D. said...

Interesting post, Hilary and I loved the humour, as well. ☺ Sometimes, taking the wrong bus can be worthwhile. I'm ashamed to admit, caryatid was a word I wasn't familiar with. Sad, considering I have seen so many of them. So, thanks for the education and the delightful read, as always. I'm skipping the A to Z as well. Might do WEP, except, no good idea has made itself known, so far. Cheers!

LD Masterson said...

Ah, I wasn't sure about the meaning until I read the previous comments.

My eldest and his family are in London right now on vacation and sending some great pictures of buildings there.

retirementreflections said...

Hi, Hilary - Now that I've read your post, I realize that I have seen caryatids before...but I never knew what they were called. Hopefully, I will be able to use this "new learning" when I am in Rome this Spring! :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Fil - just as long as it's 'happy school' so you're willingly here! Yes I am rather fond of the word caryatid now ...

They've revamped Devonshire Park Tennis centre to accommodate the international players ... especially for the Eastbourne tournament - pre Wimbledon.

I'd love to visit the Observatory - so much on my TBS to visit list!

Isn't it going to be wonderful next week - longer evenings ... well that Brrr word I fear will be around for a while yet ...

@ Debbie - I'm just glad everyone's finding Caryatid 'entertaining'!

I've never been shunted off into a siding ...but I have got on the wrong part of a train and ended up in Chichester ... not where I wanted to be on a hot hot summer's night! I've had track walks ... but in Austria - another tale ... at least you weren't on your own I guess and could laugh with each other as you carried on telling the tale - happy memories ...

@ Jacqui - gosh 'poster child' ... well that's a new nickname for me! But one I rather like ... I'll pass that idea around quite happily! I'm just glad my eclectic take on subjects and in writing up posts seems to keep you all happy to return!

@ Lisa - oh I've done that too ... seen where the bus takes me - and how long it takes. Yes ... someone else driving is always useful. Caryatid is something I won't forget now!

Oh thanks for enjoying the ramble ... I could be doing more - but I'm run myself ragged - in fact most of the talks etc are only once a month ... but I'd love to have your company for my TBS places ... I think we need a group!

@ Sherry - I think one could write a story or two about the caryatid women> Love the idea of that Cleveland Cultural Gardens set up you posted about today ...

@ Deborah - gosh funny things people dream about!!! I'm sure the women wish they could wander and perhaps change position ... but perhaps you're right about them moving inexorably onwards ... even if we can't see it.

My bus ride was fine .. til it decided to go straight back to town. I thank goodness am not directionally dyslexic, except oddly enough in Cape Town - when I could not get my head round the mountain ... being in the southern half of the world might have had something to do with it. I guess you're used to stopping and asking for help - not something we like to do though ...

Lots going on that's for sure ...

@ Debbie - thanks so much - but finding new routes is always interesting ... though not sure mine down here have passed that test! Well I seem to be educating most people at the moment ... and yes there are plenty of caryatids around. Just one word out of the many, no doubt, in the architectural dictionary. Hope WEP comes to fruition and I see you there ...

@ LD - good to see you, and how lovely that your son and his family are 'up the road' in London town ... lots to see! Caryatids all over the show! Enjoy the pictures they're sending over ...

@ Donna - yes we've all seen caryatids ... just I had no idea what the term was ... oh gosh you'll be seeing so much when you're over in Rome - lucky you ... enjoy the trip.

Thanks so much to you all - glad the post educates and amuses ... that makes it so worthwhile writing up - cheers for now - Hilary

Sandra said...

The façade of the Bank of England is pretty impressive.

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

Now th is was interesting, thank you

Rhodesia said...

As ever I have also learnt something new from you, so now I also know what a caryatid is. You never cease to amaze me with the things that I have learnt from you. Have a good remainder to the week Diane

Debby Gies said...

So much fun to read Hilary. You have been a busy beaver. Good for you, living life to the fullest!. I had a chuckle about the bus. Yep, you should have just walked. ;)

Susan Kane said...

He must have learned much about structure and support, stuff from being the son of a brick layer.

Such timeless buildings.

Did you wear some heavy duty walking shoes?!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sandra - I think that early Bank of England building must have stood out in the early 1800s - they tended to do big in those days ... so you're right = impressive.

@ Jo-Anne - glad you enjoyed it ...

@ Diane - I don't look for things ... they seem to pop up and then of course I have to concoct a post around the subject ... but I'm delighted you enjoy being here ...

@ Debby - life ticks on as I settle back in ... not the easiest at times. I should have walked back ... but the bus was due - and I thought I'll hop on it ... more often than not, I walk back ...

@ Susan - one wonders where the ideas come from ... but those were the days for some grand designs and I guess he had the ability to work things out - talented chap ... as you say timeless buildings.

No - just normal (but comfortable) shoes ... it's not far - about 25 minutes or so into town, and about the same back ... and then I can get on various buses if I'm going to the outreach areas of Eastbourne ...

Thanks everyone - so good to see you all ... I wasn't sure about 'my caryatid' post! Cheers Hilary

Keith's Ramblings said...

I'm delighted I'm not the only one who'd not heard of a caryatid! Yet again I will leave your post having added to my meagre fund of knowledge! Btw, if you need info on our local buses, I'm your man! Looking forward to your piece about Devonshire Park Theatre. I should know more than I do given that for many years I ran the now-defunct Stage Door Bistro in Carlyle Road which had strong connections to all things and persons theatrical in Eastbourne. Anyone for tennis?

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Hi-ya, Hilary, and thank you, dear lady. You've taught me something new. Caryatid, eh? Delightful! And YOU are nothing like a caryatid. Nothing at all. The way you toddle around town and delve into this and that, there's nothing static about you.

I love your bus story. Sounds like something I would do. When I was a young girl, sometimes my girlfriend and I would get on the bus and ride it through its entire route and back to where we started. It was a fun way to kill time, and it only cost a quarter. :)

Take care. Seeya in May.

Lynda Dietz said...

So much beautiful architecture! I would feel like I had to keep touching everything.

Your bus ride cracks me up. I can picture myself doing the same thing, getting lost in the scenery and not realizing until the last minute.

I'm not able to do the A to Z this year, either, but will make the rounds to support those who do.

Melissa Sugar said...

Hello, my dear friend and twin. It’s always nice to read your inspirational words on my blog whenever I return from lengthy breaks. I quite like the new word you taught me "caryatid." And I know exactly what you mean when you mention learning a new word and then ... suddenly ... the word is all around. You wonder how you ever missed it before. You used it with such descriptive, evocative emotion as you compared yourself to a caryatid --"a static person holding up numerous tendrils of learning." You always have kept yourself busy, well informed and I love that you never stop learning.

Lately I've been feeling a bit like a caryatid myself ... a static person holding up tendrils of columns (emotional, my mother's estate, the trust for the kids, fighting with the trustee, trying to close the estate, keep the family from falling apart because when the matriarch dies, the one who made all the decisions, and the heirs are left with deciding whether to keep or sell a family home, the beach condo etc., the one certainty is that no one agrees on anything. That has contributed enormously to my sadness and depression. I just want our family to remain intact and not argue over petty issues.

I enjoyed your post. I'll miss you during the challenge this year, but I can see you will be busy with many challenges, It will be good to just to reconnect and catch up.

I've been away form this blog for so long and I'm in the process of starting a WP blog, I didn't realize all the changes Google made to blogger. In fact, I couldn't even reply to the comment you left on my blog. I have no idea why, but that's my next task: figure out why I can't reply to comments and the whole blogger comment situation now that Google plus is defunct.

Thank you for your kind and positive thoughts and words about my mom and advice for moving forward. You've been a very good friend to me.

Melissa @
Sugar Crime Scene


Vallypee said...

Well you’ve taught me something new too, Hilary, and I’m an architecht’s daughter too. Amazing how we come across things that then suddenly seem to be everywhere, isn’t! Thanks for a truly interesting post. I enjoyed this.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Keith - oh good ... each of my posts is usually attempting to teach me something, before you get to read it - I'm just grateful people come by and comment ... even if it is about Caryatids!

Oh yes - please help with the buses ... actually I can't really go far wrong here ... the trains could be worse.

I must check in with you sometime re your foodie establishments, as I'd like to know more. The Stage Door as it was ... I think has just been refurbished, I only go in there occasionally usually when the Ashridge Circle talks are on ... and obviously haven't been since I went away.

Devonshire Park Theatre - I only took brief notes ... and my other details are still in the store ... perhaps I'll do something in May or June. Love my tennis though ...

@ Susan - I know these words one finds scouting around for things to write up. The brain isn't static - that is for certain.

The bus ... shouldn't have happened - I've still not worked out why I ended up back where I started - ah well!! I've never done that ... but yes I can imagine as kids you'd get on the bus and see where it took you ... especially if it was relatively cheap to do ... and now see you in May.

@ Lynda - some amazing buildings we've got over here: we are so lucky. Some of the sculptures one wants to stroke ... as you say put one's hand out to feel ... so tactile.

The bus ride - was frustrating as I really wanted to get home ... but a post arrives somehow! I'll be around for the A-Z - but will try and get as much free time as I can during April.

@ Melissa - yes ... hallo twin! I'm a late developer ... I believe it is called ... a very late learner - but I do enjoy it. It's great being able to post - and commenters come on seeming to enjoy whatever I've ended up writing about. I need my tendrils of learning, as my hair is distinctly tendril-less!

I do feel for you ... losing your mother in such a desperate way ... and then holding things together, as well as negotiate the will and the trustee. I hope you can solve the challenges without them becoming burdensome to you as the time passes - it's bad enough dealing with the sorrow, but adding in unnecessary angst just makes it so stressful. I hope there is someone or people who are there for you. I can quite empathise with you re your issues ... take care and with lots of hugs and positive thoughts from this side of the pond. May it resolve itself soon.

I'd like to do the A-Z ... but really need the time to sort my life out ... but I'll be reading yours - as I've always enjoyed reading the posts and working things out.

I've just stayed with Blogger - very basic ... but it suits me - I'm not into social media - so I can relax and as long as friends turn up (like you) then I'm happy. I never got into G+, thought I won't worry til I need it - which obviously now will be never ... as Google has taken it off into its history annals!

Just take care and I am sorry about your mother ... you are such a strong family - which has had its ups and downs ... with lots of thoughts and definitely positive vibes over the airwaves.

@ Val - it seems most of us hadn't heard of Caryatid ... and how fascinating you're an architect's daughter. Yes - it is strange how things appear and then suddenly they're like buses coming at us in all directions ...

Thanks so much to you all for visiting and enjoying this 'odd' post on the ancient word Caryatid ... just delighted it amused you ... cheers Hilary

Aj @ Read All The Things! said...

That’s annoying about the bus. I love your photos, though. It looks like a pretty place to visit.

Aj @ Read All The Things!

DMS said...

Well I learned a lot here today. I hadn't heard of the word caryatid before- or if I had, I didn't retain the information. Like you, I find when I learn something new the word or topic pops up in all kinds of places. :)

Your bus trip sounds like something that would happen to me.

Have a wonderful weekend!
~Jess

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ AJ - just unfortunate about the bus ... I'll have to work out why (sometime). I gather the King's Observatory is wonderful - some friends went up to see ... while Eastbourne isn't bad!

@ Jess - another new word ... I knew about the columns but had never known the word. Yes ... Caryatid is appearing all over the place now ...

The bus trip was just one of those things ... it seems to happen to so many of us at times.

Thanks to you both for visiting - here's to Spring! Cheers Hilary

Trisha said...

Once again I've learned something new. Though I feel like I should have known this one already since I studied mythology, ancient history etc., in school and at university. ;)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Trisha - lovely to see you here. Perhaps the course in Australia had a slightly different coverage, so including the methodology of the date setting of moveable feasts in the Christian calendar wasn't that much a deal for your learning process. But it's interesting to remember ... cheers Hilary