Sunday, 21 July 2019

Men blasted off to the moon …




Hey Diddle Diddle,
The cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon.
The little dog laughed,
To see such sport,
And the dish ran away with the spoon …


… while men blasted off to the moon …



Sufficient has been shown, said, relayed in recent days to remind us of those times … I’ve been wondering why I don’t remember … and think I’ve worked it out - to be revealed early August …


c/o CSIRO - The Parkes Observatory is a radio
telescope observatory in New South Wales, Australia;
this picture, taken in 1969, shows the Parkes
Observatory’s main 64 metre (210 ft) diameter
radio telescope dish, around the time it received
transmissions from Apollo 11, with a crescent moon
 visible in the background.  The photo is part of
CSIRO's Science Image archive.
  


This photo was featured as Wiki’s image of the day (20 July 2019) – which I think is wonderful …


… and a reminder of the collaborative effort to achieve and record this momentous technological advance …



Australia played an important role in helping NASA reach the Moon and send TV images to millions around the world. 




Forty years on, it is still one of the most advanced telescopes of its kind. A gigantic structure of steel and concrete, the telescope soars nearly 55 metres into the sky.




Country Meadow
Albert Schweitzer (1875 – 1965) brings us back to earth with this quote:  


"In the hope of reaching the moon men fail to see the flowers that blossom at their feet."


Have we gone too fast … or are we just curious … and the only way we find out is to start …

Anyway – here’s to that man on the moon … so many of us will have memories from or of those days …


Clever logo?!

Wikipedia's page on Parkes Observatory ...  

CSIRO's Science Image archive ... 

The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) runs Parkes Observatory.  CSIRO is an independent Australian federal government agency.


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

44 comments:

Joseph said...

I was still at Melbourne Uni in 1969 and I remember the day very well. My psychology building didn't have a TV in it. But the physics building did. So I crept into an empty lab and watched the entire moon landing by myself. Goose bumps then.. and a bit now.

Hels (Joseph was still in Sydney in 1969)

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
I remember it very well - was already an affirmed sci-fi geeky type even at age 10 and to see this all happening was gobsmacking. Now, fifty years distant, it seems almost like sci-fi itself. Anyway; it has been fascinating to relive the lunar programme through a variety of very good films. YAM xx

Jz said...

Oh, yes.
My folks were away and my brother woke me up to come watch the landing on TV. So exciting!

Ann Bennett said...

I remember a story about aboriginal people in Australia who were some of the few people so adept with searching the sky and stars, they could point out satellites and of course the orbiters.

1969 seems so far away. It was also a turbulent year in the states.

David M. Gascoigne, said...

Hello Hilary: I think that this is one of the events in one's life that is tatooed on the brain forever, and I suspect that everyone who was of an age to do so remembers exactly where they were. But I am particularly struck by the quote from Albert Schweitzer. It really is true that we often fail to see the beauty and mystery all around us. As someone who has been connected to nature all my life, I have perhaps been aware of these phenomena more than some, but not nearly enough, I am sure. The irony is that with each passing year I become more and more entranced with nature in all its dazzling diversity and I would not want to live without it. Perhaps my appreciation comes from the sombre knowledge that the time left to enjoy it is getting short.

Botanist said...

I was only nine at the time, but I still remember watching on our tiny B&W TV in the corner of my parents' bedroom. The world seemed so full of possibilities back then.

Joanne said...

The science involved in taking man to the moon brought us so many other useful things we do use day to day. Quite fascinating and amazing - the Right Stuff all around

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Hels - one of those dates .. yet I don't remember the day at all - in another place. How fascinating remembering those details - indicative of our age. You watched all by yourself ... not sure I could have done that. I bet it was goose bumps - I've rather removed myself yet again ...

@ Yam - oh great: already a sci-fi geeky type by the age of 10 - I used to love the techie programmes too - but obviously never worked out the science bits! I really should catch up - but haven't felt the capacity for it ... I'll try and rectify that. But glad you're enjoying the re-runs etc ... I've listened a lot ...

@ Jz - wonderful you didn't both sleep through it - I bet it was exciting: two youngsters learning some wonderful things ...

@ Ann - good to see you. I'm certain in clear pristine skies and to 'sage' peoples they could tell when something wasn't static and thus was man made or a comet.

1969 does seem a long time ago - yet not so far at all ...

@ David - it's funny ... it's not tatooed on my brain and I've no idea why - it should be, but most definitely isn't.

Yes - the Schweitzer quote appeared at a Flower Festival I visited at the local church ... and it resonated so well for this post.

You've certainly introduced me to the avian way of life ... so I assume you worked in that environment ... or at school or Uni.


I love the posts you put up for us ... so though I wasn't academic - I've really appreciated all the learning I get via the blog and friends - so many interesting subjects.

I don't think about how many years I've got left - but yes of course each year passes and one wonders ... I hope I've a good few years to go ...

@ Ian - younger than me ... but a great age to watch and yes it probably was in B+W ... I think the world is still full of possibilities - so much more for us to do ...

@ Joanne - the cold war did much to stimulate scientists ... as now with China and India. It's amazing how as humans we move forward - so many really clever people out there. As you say: fascinating and yes, the Right Stuff all round.

Thanks everyone - interesting to remember where we were - and what we were doing ... in 1969 ... a particularly evocative year ... have good weeks - cheers Hilary

Chatty Crone said...

I remember watching it on television - hard to believe it has come and gone.

I am going to put this on my next blog -but do you know the first food eaten ON the moon?

Love, sandie

bazza said...

I don't think we can say that we've gone too fast Hilary. The last manned moon landings were in 1972! If you are not aware of it NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day site, it is always interesting:
https://apod.nasa.gov
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s instantly intransigent Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Elephant's Child said...

Both Parkes and the Honeysuckle Tracking Station (closer to home) had a huge part to play. Co-operation at its best.

Susan Kane said...

1969 was a huge year: Lunar Landing, Woodstock, Vietnam escalation, and I graduated from High School. I will remember that year!

Ann: I watched "The Right Stuff" yesterday. The Aborigine are given praise for their skills. "The Dish" is about that 1969 event and how Parkes Observatory role was important.

Great times.

Liz A. said...

Great image. Alas, I did not exist on that day in 1969.

Rhonda Albom said...

I remember those days and the excitement that the moon landing brought. I think the adults of the time had a much better grasp of what was happening than me but I was still amazed to see the images on the B&W TV.

retirementreflections said...

Hi, Hilary - I agree that this was an event that most people never forget!!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sandie - yes it is hard to believe it's come and gone ... I've no idea about the food - should be nothing ... no contamination - but I expect you'll have some fun take.

@ Bazza - I think I was referring to how much else we've achieved and questioning whether we actually need to go back to the moon - I can see it'll be a good launch pad, and though not hostile perhaps won't offer as much as those far off planets and stars - hence the reaching out further into space. I didn't know about NASA's pic of the day - good to know ... and I'm sure is fascinating to see ...

@ EC - yes you'd have been close to the Honeysuckle Tracking Station and Parkes ... and I'm sure they do a great deal now: still collaborating scientifically ...

@ Susan - It was a huge year and I realised about Woodstock, but not Vietnam - and many of our vintage were doing one thing or the other - end of school, or Uni.

Re "The Right Stuff" - I hadn't realised about the film ... I was out in South Africa at that stage - and I obviously need to get Tom Wolfe's book, and/or watch the film - thanks for reminding us about it. You've introduced me to "The Dish" - another I really should know about ... or at least see - especially as I've noted about Parkes and its role.

Great times as you mention and now two films to find ...

@ Liz - you have the advantage of youth!

@ Rhonda - B+W tv ... seems so long ago. Yes I think you're right - my knowledge has grown exponentially in my latter years. It is extraordinary what was achieved back then ...

@ Donna - I don't remember ... but think I've worked out why - now I rather wish I had some memories! Such is life ...

Thanks so much - you've given me ideas to read up more, or films to see ... blogging really does add to the mix of life - cheers and have good week ahead - Hilary

Keith's Ramblings said...

I'm with Albert Schweitzer! There is so much about our planet we've yet to discover I'm sure.

Sue Bursztynski said...

They let us leave school and go home to watch. And, sorry, Mr Schweitzer, but I think there is room for both.

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

I've always been sad that I didn't get to see that landing live (a few years before I was born). Such an amazing feat of science!

Jo said...

Have you ever seen the movie The Dish? One of my favourites. It is a not too serious look at the part the Parkes telescope's part in the moon landings.

I do remember the day, I was in a Yugoslavian Taxi at the time. Didn't see the TV pix til later.

Dan said...

I tend to remember the fact that we set that goal in the 60s and completed it in the 60s. It doesn't seem that we have that kind of 'can do' spirit today.

Jacqui Murray said...

What a wonderful summation of the collaborative effort that was. I love the mental image of Americans on the Moon and Australians talking to them via satellite.

Rhodesia said...

Where has the last 50 years gone? I find it hard to believe that it was that long ago. “That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” Hope all is well. Sorry I seldom get to My life in the Charente nowadays as it takes too much time doing research, but I keep the photodiary going.
Have a good week. Cheers Diane

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Keith - yes I loved the quote and thought it appropriate for this post. There's lots to discover here and out there - I'd love to know more ... but I keep exploring and writing up some of it ...

@ Sue - oh brilliant they let you off school to watch at home; yes I also agree with you -there's room for both ... yet so many forget about our planet and how precious it is - we need to look after this world.

@ Elizabeth - count your blessings 'mi dear' - you're much younger than many of us! But as you say such an amazing feat of scientific achievement ...

@ Jo - No ... I haven't seen The Dish - but Susan Kane above mentions the film ... as too The Right Stuff - but I'd like to see both.

Lucky you on that beautiful Yugoslavian coast ...

@ Dan - yes: it was certainly a mega goal ... amazingly completed as you mention. We don't have that motivation today do we ... there I agree ...

@ Jacqui - thanks it was very simple ... but having not paid much attention at the time it's time I paid some attention! I'd never really thought about the involvement of other nations - naive on my behalf ... but I'm learning!

@ Diane - exactly where has the last 50 years gone? I've got my elderly brain into gear and will follow you over at your PhotoDiary ...

Thanks so much to you all - that amazing landing is so extraordinary ... but opened the doors to so much that we continue to enjoy today ... cheers Hilary

Friko said...

I remember the day and I remember how awed I was. Man is capable of so much why must mankind go and spoil so much too?

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

I don't remember much about the moon-landings either, though I can't for the life of me figure out why I recall so little about it. Possibly I was infatuated with one of the pupils from the Girls' High School at the time, a fairly regular but often brief occurrence at that time. I've always rather liked this quotation from the photographer Andre Kertesz who simply said "We don't know how beautiful nature really is; we can only guess".

Anabel Marsh said...

I remember it happening and being quite awe-struck, though the mission I remember best is the one that almost didn’t make it back. I was beside myself with worry for those guys.

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

I have been out to the Parks Observatory and seen the dish and I have seen the movie The Dish

Janie Junebug said...

I remember going for a walk after dark with my dad. We stopped to look at the moon, so large in the sky and so far away. I tried to imagine what the man up there were doing.

Love,
Janie

Lenny Lee said...

cool Australia's technological observatory played a role in the Apollo 11 program. all week, i've watched documentaries about Apollo 11 and am amazed at the fantastic engineering and the thousands of people who played a part in the moon landing. from rockets to the LEM, space suits, boots and all things big and small,it was a fantastic collaborative effort.

there were lots of sci fi moon movies on too. i watched a lot of them. one of my favs is H.G. Wells, The First Men in the Moon.

hope i take a trip into space some day.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Friko - how right you are ... man is capable of so much, yet spoils so much and also manages to be cruel to others ... we just need appreciation, compassion and understanding ...

@ John - ah ha ... girl power! Mine was somewhat different ... but off on another track. What a wonderful quote by Andre Kertesz - it is so true ... 'we don't know how beautiful nature is - we can only guess' ...

@ Anabel - I too do remember fearing for them every time a mission was launched ... and then knowing some hadn't ever got there ... brave and ghastly at the same time ...

@ Jo-Anne - I gather 'The Dish' film is worth seeing - I must make a plan sometime ... I'm so pleased you visited the Observatory ...

@ Janie - I think we all wondered what the moon was doing there, so high in the sky - we do live in amazing times ...

@ Lenny - good to know you've been keeping your finger on the pulse! I probably should have paid more attention recently - but lots of other things going on ...

Thanks for adding the bit about the HG Wells' film 'The First Men on the Moon' ... the concept sounds fun ...

Do you really want to go into space - gosh ... I think I'll stay here! Excellent you'd love to explore the outer reaches of space = a great goal ...

Thanks so much for all your visits - wonderful memories, or not as some of us obviously had other things going on ... and then the thoughts re films, books and quotes - delighted with the additional ideas. It's an interesting world ... all the best - Hilary

Lynda Dietz said...

I grew up in a Pennsylvania town named Apollo, so we had annual moonlanding parties and parades! When I was little, I thought everyone did.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Lynda - amazing isn't it ... one thinks that no-one could have, or no place could be named after the Greek gods - but they are ... wonderful placed name; I bet you had/they have annual moonlanding parties and parades ... and oh yes how we can invent ideas ... fun to read about - cheers Hilary

Marja said...

Oh wow that is a big telescope and I wasn't aware they had one like this in Australia and that they worked with NASA
Can't remember a lot about the moon landing I was about 8 years old than
Love the photo of the gorgeous wildflowers

mail4rosey said...

We recently went to the Kennedy Space Center in Orlando, Florida. They had quite a bit about when the US got to the moon. I cried when the president of the time gave his speech. It was pretty emotional. It's amazing what people can do. Visits to the moon!!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Marja - I have to say I really need to find out more about the Parkes Telescope ... i.e. seeing the film that's been suggested 'The Dish' ... as well as trying to find 'The Right Stuff' on the net. It's interesting reading about where we've all our memories are from ... I loved the Schweitzer quote - so felt the need to put the flowers in ...

@ Rosey - that must have been so interesting ... and I can believe the emotions would rise when you watched the President give his speech - very American. Visits to the moon - yes I'd do it ... if it wasn't so dodgy and didn't take so long, and wasn't so claustrophobic ... but can see the draw ...

Thanks so much the two of you ... good to read your comments - thank you ... cheers Hilary

Elsie Amata said...

I wasn't even 12 hours old yet so I don't remember a thing but I get the privilege of saying I'm a moon baby. :) I really hope that we get to place in the US that we continue to explore space. Really explore space. Like Star Trek!

Elsie

Karen Jones Gowen said...

I remember the moon landing very well. It's kind of weird though how after that things really slowed down with space travel. When there was the blow up that killed all the astronauts in 1985 or was it 1986, everything just kind of stopped after that.

Tara Tyler said...

we need to look up, but always remember what’s down!
lovely tribute to our man in the moon and here’s to finding more adventure out there - and down here as well.
thanks for supporting me — love hearing from you!

Tara Tyler Talks

Carole Anne Carr said...

The one thing that can be safely said about space exploration, Hilary, is that many scientific discoveries have stemmed from these adventures into space - discoveries that have been of value to those of us who, at the parent time, are firmly grounded on poor old earth 🌹

Vallypee said...

Amazing to think it’s 50 years ago. I remember all the news about it but we didn’t watch television in those days, so although it seemed incredible, it didn’t make such an impact on me then.. I remember hearing Tommy by the Who for the first time that summer too. It made a much deeper impression on me...haha. I was 14 then, so more focused on teenage things. Still, space exploration has led to many other scientific developments!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Elsie - yet moon baby!, the space interest obviously kicked in early and you love the thought to this day ... Star Trek - well most of us enjoy that ...

@ Karen - It is interesting how things slowed, then the next 'rush of technological improvements' spurred the ability to explore the space beyond again ...

@ Tara - yes look up, but wonder at what grows beneath our feet. We tend to forget what makes us on this planet. It's a pleasure to support you ...

@ Carole Anne - I know much innovation and knowledge comes from revolution, war and space travel - we can learn so much and discover more which will help us earth lovers through our lives ...

@ Val - I remember the era ... but not it actually happening; I have to say I wasn't in to music ... so only appreciated Tommy later on in life and all music from that era. Like you I was busy doing other things - but as you say space exploration has led to many scientific discoveries ...

Thanks so much - space exploration is extraordinary and now we can start to find out so much about our world around us ... here's to that moon! Cheers Hilary

Nilanjana Bose said...

I was too teeny to remember the exact details but do remember the excitement of the adults. And re the flowers quote - personally I am super greedy, I'd like to have my moon and my flowers too! 'There's nothing that you can see that is not a flower/there's nothing you can think that is not the moon' - who said that? Matsuo Basho I think.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nila - it's funny I don't - think I've worked out why ... but I should remember! I know I'd miss the moon if it wasn't there, but do love the flowers and plants as I walk around and watch the seasons come and go.

Re your quote - you're right it was Matsuo Basho (1644 – 1694) – the most famous poet of the Edo period in Japan – the haiku master. I have to say you've introduced me to someone of whom I knew nothing - except the term haiku. Thank you for the introduction ...

Lovely to see you here - cheers Hilary