Friday, 25 October 2019

We are the World Blogfest # 30: Invisible Women, Chhanv Foundation and Project Why …




Invisible Women – how often do we (the females of this world) feel that way … rather more often than we should … while here in the west … we can at least speak out, and reasonably often get heard.

#WATWB

 The book about Fifty Percent of human beings of the world shows how imperfect research, algorithms, scientific papers – all are based on the 50% standard man (who is that?!) …





Invisible Women - exposing data bias in
a world designed for men ... 

… much of life has been designed by and for ‘the man’ – so often no comparisons are done for the women of this world … this goes right down to our cells … we are different (so different) to the other half of the world. 



All I can say is – please read this book … order it into your local library … and encourage other readers to read it.  It is extraordinary … AI is coming along – who is it designed by?  who is it designed for … half the world’s population, or are we expected to believe it’s applicable to us all …






A victim showing her bravery ...
c/o Chhanv Foundation

Moving right along – but under the ‘banner’ of invisible … people who have had acid thrown into their faces … yes it can happen to both men and women, though usually females.



Chhanv is a non-profit organisation in India working for the rehabilitation of acid attack survivors. 






A youngster, who's been offered the chance to
learn and help himself and others
via Project Why (image c/o Project Why)


Project Why, also a non-profit organisation, working to educate, support and encourage underprivileged children, who have to scavenge to help each other live the organisation offers spaces for them to dream, learn and transform their young livesa place of hope




Damyanti’s book ‘You Beneath Your Skin’ is supporting both charities … and any small or large donation you could give them (preferably both charities, but either) would be wonderful … these people didn’t ask to live their lives as they do … but as you can see – they have a life … they can smile and they will help others, who suffer similarly …


Please support her
I highly recommend you read her book (it is very well written) … especially if you like thrillers … and like to learn – you’ll be taken to the underbelly of Delhi life … a place for us to know more about – however much you might not want to know … the situations occur here in the UK, as they will do in all countries … and any purchases of the book will support both charities.


Project Why has just lost a major donor – Cook’s Travel - and so could really do with extra support.


All proceeds from Damyanti’s book (via Amazon) will go towards Project Why and Chhanv … so please buy, and/or please order from your library … my request is ‘under review’ … 


Damyanti Biswas had the excellent idea of the #WATWB posting format - on the last Friday of the month ... encouraging us bloggers, authors, writers to promote positive stories ... a necessity in this troubled world of ours … we aim to shine a light on positive projects that draw us in …


Let us flood social media with peace and love, and “In Darkness, Be Light.”


Belinda was one of the founders of this amazing idea – to challenge us all to let the world know about a human news story that lights our world … here’s her guidelines … please join us – we’d love to see more #WATWB articles …


Project Why link ... 



PS - I didn't explain myself too well here ... Invisible Women ... refers to the data collected, the fact that most things are designed by men for men - i.e. the seat belt ... set for the 'standard man' - no differences taken into account for women.  

Or eg only talking to men for research into something new ... presumably we feature as 50% of users as well ... 

or ... all the unpaid work that is done: caring, housework, taking care of house and home - is usually not factored into what constitutes being paid for ... 


Hilary Melton-Butcher 
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

55 comments:

David M. Gascoigne, said...

I am happy that I can get my Hilary fix this morning. As always, you challenge us to think about topics that we may riot otherwise choose to, and at times are perhaps uncomfortable with. As a died in the wool male, who appreciates your differences right down to your cells, I subscribe wholeheartedly to the notion that we need more female influence in our lives, not less; in our private lives and our public lives. The wisdom of women is unquestionable, their moderating influence in world affairs a fact (would you rather deal with Angela Merkel or Donald Trump, is Boris Johnson really doing a better job than Teresa May?). I am never happier than when I am in the company of intelligent women. Fortunately in my life this is all the time. As for child poverty it confounds me that with all our sophistication, all our technology, and all of our oft stated resolve, we still have been unable to eradicate child poverty and exploitation. Shame on us.

Jz said...

These are both going on my list... and at least one will be given for the holidays, too. (Altho' I may need to supplement with something cheery, as well.)
Thanks for bringing them to our attention!

David M. Gascoigne, said...

The first sentence should say "that we may not" and not "we may riot." I am sure that this device sometimes types whatever it feels like without assistance from my fingers,

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

Thank you for highlighting these books and these issues, Hilary...they're so important. Like David said, it's good for me to think about difficult topics that I may be uncomfortable and unfamiliar with. Food for thought this weekend, thank you!

nothoughtsnoprayersnonothing said...

I particularly like thinking of art as recovery and as a way to heal. Writing, painting, singing can all help.

WATWB really does prove that nothing is impossible.

https://nothoughtsnoprayersnonothing.blogspot.com/2019/10/impossible.html

Susan Scott said...

Hi Hilary, I can't wait to read Damyanti's book that's on my kindle - I know I'll be getting thoroughly out of my comfort zone, but who said life was a bed of roses anyway. Thank you for highlighting both charities. Have a lovely weekend, and thank you for your post :)

Chatty Crone said...

Okay I really liked learning about these things which I had no idea that existed. We really live in a mixed up world. Thanks for bringing it to our attention!

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Brilliant post, Hilary. Unfortunately, women have been invisible for way too many years, and graciously tried to fit into the one-size-fits-all mold that was designed for us by men. We in the western world are much more fortunate, but it's unthinkable what women still endure in other parts of the world. Thanks for shining a light on it and for mentioning those books. I've already purchased Damyanti's book, but haven't gotten around to reading it yet. I was already looking forward to it, but now I'm looking forward to reading it even more.

Have a wonderful weekend, dear lady.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

I hope Damy's contribution makes all difference for Project Why.

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
It's a long, hard battle, this changing the nature of "MANkind"... have added Damyanti's book to my 'next-time-on-A' list!!! YAM xx

Debbie D. said...

Thanks for highlighting these books, Hilary! Invisible Women sounds like a must read, for sure. I'll add it to my list. Damyanti's novel is already on tap. We don't hear that much about acid attacks in Canada. Horrifying! These brave victims deserve our love and support. Sad news about Project Why losing a backer! I hope another corporate sponsor will step in. In the meantime, purchasing Damyanti's book is something everyone can do to help.

Lynda Dietz said...

There are so many needs in the world, with such a variety of causes to support. These are a few of the really important ones, and I'm proud of Damyanti for committing to donating her profits from her first book. Thank you for featuring this! Hope you are doing well, Hilary.

Inger said...

I will come back here with my Kindle so I can check out these books. Thank you for this important post, for your caring, and for just being you.

Elephant's Child said...

Huge thanks for your always thought provoking posts on this important topic. And to Damyanti for the inspiration and her commitment to making the world a better, brighter, safer place.
I will (when the unread tower diminishes) track both of these books down.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ David – you are a star … amazing that you appreciate my topics and writing quite so much – thank you!

The book is well worth looking at – check it out (with Miriam) in a shop or at the library … and you’ll see what I mean …

That’s great that you enjoy our (womens’) company – all peoples who are reasonable, civilised and prepared to listen and share – you are lucky and you understand.

Damyanti’s book really highlights both needs of the charities – the cruelty people inflict, as well as the complete lack of empathy we can feel for those in the gutter … as these families are.

I did catch your note re your sentence – I agree … I think at times it’s got a mind of its own … glad it’s corrected.

@ Jz – excellent – they are well worth it … Damyanti’s will support the charities … Invisible Women: won the Royal Society’s Science Book Prize …

I’m happy to know they’re on your Christmas list for giving or receiving … and ok yes you can add something cheery …

@ Elizabeth – I’m pleased you feel you need to assimilate the concept of these books … definitely worth thinking about … while it’d be great if you could buy Damyanti’s – it’d support those charities … while the Invisible Women book is main stream and is so informative …

@ Mae – yes art healing also helps hugely … #WATWB and its associate posts and FB postings are so worthwhile …

@ Susan – you will be totally drawn in to Damyanti’s book ... it’s superb. Also supporting the charities is so well worthwhile. Please check out Invisible Women … such interesting reading …

@ Sandie – I’m glad you took note of the books – please check them out …

@ Susan – thanks so much - this will open your eyes to the ways women haven’t been thought about when ‘life’ has been designed around us in this world …if you get a chance – check the book out.

Damyanti’s book is very different and is amazing that she’s supporting these two charities through her sales … you’ll support her even more once you’ve read it!!

I do hope all is well with you … all the very best.

@ Alex – yes I sure hope Damyanti’s contribution will provide a lot more support for both the charities …

@ Yam – it’s a long hard grind … but the book puts a different light on that ‘grind’. That’s excellent Damyanti’s book is on your A list … you’ll enjoy the read …

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Debbie – pleasure – they are both well worth reading … Damyanti’s sales support the charities. We don’t hear much about acid attacks here – yet there was an appalling one on a bus in London ‘recently’ which I’m sure most British people will have heard about …

Yes I hope Project Why can surmount the loss of their recent backer … I would hope the purchaser will be kind enough to step in and continue that donation … while in the meantime we can top up their funds via our purchase of Damyanti’s book …

@ Lynda – yes there are so many causes to support … I just hope these two will enjoy support from us – as readers and authors (or bloggers, or editors ..!) – excellent you’ve supported her … so well worth it …

@ Inger – thanks … I know you’ll be back and will be here to support Damyanti … as well as take note of the content of Invisible Women … brilliant to see you …

@ EC – it’s a pleasure … I prefer to post about unique and different things … Damyanti is so inspiring in her quest to support these two charities …

While Invisible Women is worth looking at – i.e. in a bookshop, or a library … to see the ‘difference’ I’m referring to – and how Caroline explains how women have been ‘researched’ out …

Great to know you’ll get to read them soon … preferably buying Damyanti’s …

Thanks so much to all of you for recognising the significance of both these books … one for reminding us about how women have been ignored through the centuries … ie swept to the side – please read this book;

Damyanti’s book – please buy … she writes really well – it’s ‘easy reading’ – not happy, but essential reading … cheers Hilary

D.G. Kaye said...

Amazing post Hilary! And thanks for the tip on the book. I will surely get it. Such a great cause. I'm currently reading Damyanti's book too <3

Liz A. said...

I get so frustrated with the world sometimes over how women get treated. Sigh.

Hels said...

Do you remember last year when the ABC was analysing forced marriages of pre-teen girls in Islamic communities? Teenage girls apply for most Islamic divorces in Australia, but imams often refuse to grant them if the husbands disagree. Muslim leaders have condemned domestic violence, even though the imams still teach that husbands can, and should control their desperate, injured and pregnant wives.

And not just Islamic husbands, of course.

lostinimaginaryworlds.blogspot.com said...

Been a convert since way back reading ‘The Second Sex’ and have been incensed by this ever since.

Jo said...

Just bought You Beneath Your Skin,

As for the invisibility of women, I wonder if that's 100% true today there are so many women scientists in all fields together with politicians, etc. etc. we are not as invisible as we were and hopefully things are improving constantly.

Jacqui said...

Project Why is such a worthy cause. Damyanti has done such a good job raising awareness of it. As for being invisible, I don't really feel that way, even when I was buried in my working world. Now, as a teacher-author, I definitely don't. But I can see for some, it is a problem.

Joanne said...

and you and your posts are rainbows - you bring light to stories that need attention and worthy causes that need help. And you smile - I can tell.

I've been a victim of the "invisible woman" concept. I was answering a question and one of my fellow workers (male) just started talking over me. It's like I wasn't there. Believe me, I cut him short and finished my sentence. But so often - that occurs. And stuff at work is designed for men - height, etc.

Thanks for this post and have a good weekend. Take care!

DMS said...

Thanks for sharing all of this important information with us. The books sound very interesting and so do the causes you informed us about. Added the books to my list and will hopefully get to check them out soon. Thanks again!
~Jess

mail4rosey said...

Well, that explains why my seatbelt never fits right, and it makes perfect sense! Nothing against men, I've raised 2.5 of them, but it does sometimes feel like the invisibility cloak has been raised against us women. ;)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Debby – so pleased that you’ll look at the book and the effects things designed by men have had on us over all these years. Brilliant you’re reading Damyanti’s book … it deserves to be read …

@ Liz – it’s more than the way we’re being treated – it’s the designs, AI, the research done … women often aren’t included in those things …

@ Hels – yes, I vaguely keep up … as similar things happen here – and it’s dreadful what that sort of society imposes on women.

This is about how things are implemented … eg car seats – designed for men, not for usually shorter women … etc

@ Carole – this book is not so much about the 2nd sex … but about how everyday things are designed by men, with a man’s standard … not taking into account us lot and our needs!

@ Jo – Damyanti’s book is fabulous – so well written, yet bringing awareness to the underworld of women’s lives … while championing the two causes she’s supporting …

Yes – we’re still invisible or kept to one side … but this is a great deal of the research that’s carried on, doesn’t always includes that research done on women … if you can take a look at the book.

@ Jacqui – yes I couldn’t agree more and I hope they (the Project Why organisation) will recover and get more funding – they’ve taken a big hit recently.

Invisible Women is more about how things are designed, selected, chosen – men decide and design … please give it a go – even via the library … your eyes will be opened …

@ Joanne – yup I smile … and I do try and write about unique projects, or different places I’ve been to – with a twist to the content … and I do enjoy – because people like you are reading and commenting – thank you.

You’ve got the gist of Invisible Women – stuff at work being designed for men – height et al … also give it a read if you can … even via the library …

@ DMS – thanks … Damyanti’s book is brilliant and supports those two charities – so please buy! Invisible Women I feel sure will feature in one of your Connecticut bookshops … and definitely at the library …

Good to know you’ll check them both out …

@ Rosey – yes … you got it in one … I’ve nothing against men either … but so many things are designed for them and by them … the mess our bodies up – giving us problems with our necks, legs, backs et al …

Thanks so much to you all – I think the message is beginning to get through … it’s the design and all the research done is gender biased – never separated out … not helpful if, as I do, we sit on this side of life!!

Cheers from a wet UK – but an extra hour’s sleep tonight … bliss – well for me … I’m a sleeper! Happy rest of the weekend - Hilary

Anabel Marsh said...

It’s not just discrimination, it’s dangerous discrimination. Eg crash test dummies being based on men. I found Caroline Criado Perez’s book an eye-opener. We have it in our library.

retirementreflections said...

I am adding both books to my TBR list right now!

Lizbeth Hartz said...

Wow, Hillary! Your posts are always interesting and informative, and this post was a real eye-opener for me. I hadn't heard of the horrible practice of throwing acid in faces! Thanks for spreading the word and educating me.

And I'm touched that Damyanti's new book supports the Chhanv Foundation and Project Why. That alone was enough for me to order it, even without all the rave reviews on Amazon. (Not to mention I'm forever grateful to her for starting the #WATWB--what a bright light illuminating darkness that is!

Keith's Ramblings said...

You've given us a lot to ponder upon in this piece Hilary. I'm a fan of thrillers and have more than once been to Delhi and visited the slums so You Beneath Your Skin sounds like a read for me.

Vallypee said...

A friend of mine had acid accidentally thrown in her face...an awful and traumatic incident that scarred her for life. How much worse it is when deliberate. A great post, Hilary. I love the way you shed light on these things, in this case discrimination.

Dan said...

I have purchased Damyanti's book and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Marja said...

Would love to read her book I can't wait to read it. Yes I know personally of women living in the shadow but doing amazing things. These man in the limelight are often the ones who don't deserve our attention

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Anabel – yes … that’s what I found when I read the book … it is dangerous discrimination and the longer it goes on the worse it’s going to get for 50% of the population. The crash dummy is an excellent example … of tests being carried out, only based on male shape dummies … it is as you say an eye opener …

@ Donna – thanks … I’m sure Caroline Criado Perez’s book will be in the VI libraries … while Damyanti’s is brilliant and will support the two charities …

@ Lizbeth – thanks so much … I do like taking a different approach with my eclectic posts. The cruelty we can inflict on another member of the population… I’d like to turn the tables and see what the perpetrator feels in the circumstances … but …

Damyanti’s support of the two charities that are just part of her caring DNA is just wonderful … and yes she was the co-founder for the #WATWB monthly series … as you say a bright light indeed illuminating the darkness out of the world.

@ Keith – oh great … yes please buy – you won’t be disappointed … and you know Delhi – so you’ll appreciate it even more … but I could get a feel of the underworld and its hold on the lower echelons of society …

@ Val – oh gosh … I can’t think how difficult it would be, adjusting to an accidental acid spill – your poor friend … but much worse in the slums of Delhi – as there’s much less support for the victim. I hope you can get her book to support the charities.

Thanks … the #WATWB monthly is a great idea … and I seem to have happily slotted in – finding ideas as time goes on. Discrimination is just so awful …

@ Dan – that’s wonderful … the charities will appreciate your support … while the book is an excellent read.

@ Marja – excellent … I know you’ll enjoy it – she writes well.

The Caroline Priado Perez’s book just highlights how discriminated against women we are in the designs and data used in research … that create products, design systems, safety nets etc … well worth getting from the library and reading …

Thanks so much to you all – yes Anabel and Val reminded me – the book is about discrimination … and another challenge – it’s embedded … and thus back-science is based on bias, before new research starts, or for those niches that were ignored …

Great to see you all – have good weeks … cheers Hilary

T. Powell Coltrin said...

Great review. I shouldn't be but I am still amazed at the disregard and cruelty some people have for others.

Teresa

Morgan said...

Thank you for the book recommendations! You are so wonderful, Hilary!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Teresa - yes, sadly we do live in a cruel world ... "the system of social structures and practices in which men dominate, oppress, and exploit women" - as described by Syliva Walby, the British Sociologist.

Both books are excellent - Invisible Women really highlights the design flaws in most of our products, and perhaps more importantly the research going on ... while Damyanti's is a fascinating, heart-breaking crime novel to read ...

@ Morgan - excellent to see you ... good luck with your publication wonderful news. Please enjoy both the books - you'll appreciate them ...

Thanks so much for the comments and it's really good to see you both ... cheers Hilary

H.R. Sinclair said...

A powerful story with a powerful history. I hope the book does super awesome.

Nilanjana Bose said...

The seat belt thingy drove me nuts while I was pregnant especially.

Wish Damyanti the very best with the book - a worthy cause. Incredibly twisted minds needed to attack someone with acid. The victims' courage is inspirational.

Thanks for highlighting this cause.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Holly - yes Damyanti's book is very compelling. While Invisible Women shows us we need to be aware of how our data is not collected ...

@ Nila - yes ... you can understand - it amazed me to read of all the things where women have not been considered or thought about in the design of so much.

I hope the two causes will be really boosted by the sales from Damyanti's book ...

Great to see you both - cheers Hilary

Pr@Gun said...

Thanks fro sharing about Damyanti's effort and book. I had always felt great about Project why and all who are associated with it. For sure to read her book soon. Was not aware of chhanv thanks for sharing about this.

Denise Covey said...

Hey Hilary. Finally got here. Great post. When I see this type of post I always think about 'history' - 'his..story'. So many worthy women are left our of our historical accounts or being written in as an afterthought.
I haven't had time to read Damyanti's book yet, but will, and Invisible Women. Can't wait...

Sandra Cox said...

Throwing acid is unbelievably barbaric and cruel. Good for all involved in fighting this. And good for you, Hilary, for bringing attention to this and invincibility.

Silvia Writes said...

Great recommendation, Hilary, and dully noted.
Most gathered data on just about anything, really, has indeed been done on men.
Also, I did see Damyanti's book.
That, too, is enticing.
Thank you for the mentions here. We do need more good books in the world.

Mark Koopmans said...

Thanks Hilary for all that you do to raise awareness to many different subjects, but especially these two charities and the amazing work they obviously do to help those in such a bad life situation.

Makes you think about the whining we do here in the west when the, for example, pizza/bus/other insignificant thing is late...

projectwhy said...

Thank you so much Hilary for this beautiful and thought provoking post and for the kind words of support to Project Why. Sadly there are millions of women who remain invisible and voiceless particularly in patriarchal societies like India. From the terrible and visible abuse like acid attacks to the more covert and even shrouded in 'kindness' abuse that girls endure every day at the hands of their families and society, abuse is prevalent in more ways than one. At project Why we see it every day and it is our endeavour to try and give a voice to all the girls and women who come to us. We hope to be able to continue to do so. Thank you again for your love and support

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Pr@Gun - Great you realise what magnificent work Damyanti is doing promoting both these charities – such deserving ones – Chhanv and too Project Why … they are both special.

@ Denise – well done – well you’re travelling … just enjoy Paris, but thanks for being here. Invisible Women has a somewhat different slant – but you’ll be totally blown away by it … while Damyanti’s underworld crime novel is just brilliant.

Her story – this is Damyanti’s story …

@ Sandra – thanks … I’m pleased to reach a few extra people … which Damyanti’s book will highlight these appalling practices … we’re not invincible, yet we will survive and fight for our place in life …

@ Silvia – excellent to see you’ll be reading both these books – and I’m so pleased you’ve picked up the ‘research’ aspect for design in our lives … mainly based on man – very little collected re women …

I do hope those fires are staying away from you …

@ Mark – thank you … I’m just appreciative that blogging friends are here, reading and taking to heart about these subjects – and prepared to read to learn more …

Yes – I know: why oh why do we whine … but some do!

@ Anou – it’s a total pleasure to support you and Project Why – you deserve so much for helping these kids, and their families.

I didn’t go into patriarchal societies … as it’s a topic I’m not really qualified to speak about – but I do wish we in the west would all set examples of leadership, understanding, democratic … so we can stand out as a model, which others could follow … I’m sure people throughout the world would prefer to live in our type of society … and we would all benefit from the kinder way of dealing with life …

Thanks so much to you all - wonderful to read you’re all so supportive of the two charities … and to know you’ve taken the book on board to read … cheers Hilary

Shilpa Garg said...

Thanks for sharing about Invisible Women and You Beneath Your Skin. Have read YBYS and loved it. Will check out Invisible Women. Thanks for sharing info about Chhanv and Project Why.... both these NGOs are doing great and helping spread smiles and light in so many people's lives!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Shilpa - I was pleased I could promote both books in the same post ... for different reasons - but all relative to improving women's lives and supporting charities ...

Invisible Women - extremely informative about the lack of data collected on women, or women's thoughts re subjects and products ... leaving us ignored in so much of life ...

Cheers please enjoy - Hilary

Dreaming said...

Interesting books - I am thinking my DIL would enjoy them as well. She just left a job in the IT industry where she felt discriminated against by her superiors - all male. She was never given the challenging coding assignments she wanted, and she was sure it was because of her gender.

My neighbor had a very rough start to life, and now is thanking her blessings by helping women from Ethiopia who have been victims of acid attacks. Each year she beings a woman into her home and finds the resources needed to give her guest the tools she needs to help her to become independent.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

H Cyndi - that's great ... they are both very informative ... Invisible Women would suit your DIL - lots of data ... Caroline Criago Perez covers the whole gambit of how women have been left out in much research that's been done, or being done. The book is about how men always ignore the female gender too - both in active life, but also in finding out their needs ...

Damyanti's book - is a very good read ... while supporting those two Delhi charities - Project Why (under-priveleged children) and Chhanv (acid attack victims) ...

I do hope you'll read both, and given them to others ... take care and thanks for coming by - cheers Hilary

Damyanti said...

Hilary, this is incredibly generous of you to include You Beneath Your Skin and share it with so many others. Your post has inspired so many to read the books--I'm getting Invisible Women, btw--and that in itself is a small good thing in a big dark world. Women have suffered down the ages, but now I think in a globalised world, women have more opportunity than ever to support and nourish each other.

Thank you for being a voice of good, for your consistent support, and for this post.

I'll be visiting everyone who commented, and am very thankful for the support!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Excellent Damyanti - it's great how everyone responded to the post and I was glad to link both books ... it's worked out well. Fascinating to see how supportive everyone is ... and people want to learn - which is great.

You'll be very interested in Invisible Women ... it's a long read with a great deal of data informed research in it ... I've just dropped it back to the library ... but I made some notes ...

It's a pleasure to be of value to friends in the blogging world and to pass out ideas and thoughts that should benefit us all ...

I'm so pleased You Beneath Your Skin is taking off so well ... good luck with its progression - there'll be lots I suspect ...

Cheers to you and all who benefit from your work with #WATWB so we can bring positivity into this, at times, rather dark world ... take care - Hilary

Lisa said...

Interesting about "us" behind the scene workers not being paid. In the US, a woman now has a right to her husband's Social Security benefits in her own right, as his partner. I like that. It is so strange that we are 50%, yet still not counted as such...

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Lisa - lovely to see you. Both books are so well worth reading ... Damyanti's, as it's a story highlighting the horrors of life, particularly children and women;

while Invisible Women reminds us that most research is gathered using men's data ... and not considering women's specifics at all - and then products, services and needs are developed using this data - few stats for the other 50% of the world ...

The author goes into so many different stats - so it's interesting to see your comment about the Social Security benefits re the USA ...

Thank you - Hilary