Tuesday, 4 August 2020

London Visits, pre lockdown, Cartography and Illustrations at Matches Fashion … part 2 ...



I’m sure you know me well enough to know that fashion is not my scene … 
Carlos Place


... thank goodness you all say, so do I!




… but geology and maps are …

London 1831
 ... going to Grosvenor Square (Carlos Place runs off it) and seeing where I used to work – near to the old American Embassy, before it moved south of the river, was tempting …




1970 - Near side of the Moon by
US Geological Survey
… but the draw was the antiquarian scientific illustrations, natural history prints and maps on display at The Fashion House in Carlos Place, which I thought would be interesting … just not to become a fashion icon!





A waiting or viewing room

When I walked in … I was directed towards their private viewing room … uh uh ... 






Cafe area looking out over rooves
I backed away laughing and saying I only wanted to see the antiquarian exhibits – they were very polite and really helpful …




Much mirrored toilet - and thus at least two of me
… I was taken to the top and allowed to wander around and down looking at the prints and peering around … an interesting experience.





Individual prints were to
be found ... a boa
constrictor

So a few images and some links … I could have spent (a lot) longer there … and could, but didn’t, have lunch – as they have a café on the top floor overlooking the local rooves …




Described as a monumental map of New York (1874)
by Egbert Ludovico Viele (1825 - 1902) - he became the
Chief Engineer of Central Park; his main claim to fame was
this map ... which took two decades of intensive research
 ... and is still consulted for developments in the city!
… it was elegantly furnished, but there were no clients … which was a pity – as that would have been interesting though I probably wouldn't have had a free rein.



Andreas Cellarius' 17th century chart explaining
the phases of the moon
My photos aren’t great - the lighting wasn’t easy … but there’s some highly recommended links – should you wish to find out more.



The Map House – exquisite art works: see what I saw here …

Illustrations of the Copernican
System - see Wiki

Cartographic  heavenly’ charts by Andreas Cellarius (1596 - 1665) dating to 1661;





Brodtmann's majestic beasts


Antique Lithographs of majestic tigers, jaguars and lions by Karl Joseph Brodtmann (1787 – 1862). 

Swiss artist, lithographer, as well as printmaker, publisher and bookseller.




Ernst Haeckel's Sea Anemones
c/o Wiki
Ernst Haeckl (1834 – 1919)– the German scientist, philosopher and artist – he was one of the most prominent men of the Belle Epoque (1870 – 1914) – championing both early Evolutionary Theory and profoundly influencing the Art Nouveau style.



Tulips by Robert Thornton - to be found in his
"The Temple of Flora" illustrated botanical works



Robert John Thornton (1768 – 1837) – English physician and botanical writer  - prints from “The Temple of Flora” …






James Sowerby by Heaphy (1816)
James Sowerby (1757 – 1822) – English naturalist, illustrator and mineralogist – his studies quickly became the main source of information at the time, when geology and mineralogy were extremely fashionable.



Geological Chart by Yaggy
All the geological rock periods are name
Levi Walter Yaggy (1848 – 1912):  American illustrator and innovative publisher of educational maps and charts, explaining the Earth’s physical features. 



Nature in Descending order

These are amazing … as the ‘This is Colossal.com’ site shows them in their full glory …




Sowerby's miniatures - hand coloured copper-
engravings from his British Mineralogy (1817)


There were other cartographic works on show … from the 1600s to the 20th century … maps, the moon, city plans – eg London, New York …




A map of the world
on the top landing


The exhibits came from The Map House, established in Beauchamp Place, Kensington … while their site also has an incredible range of works available for sale and to see: I recommend a digital visit.





This links to some of the pieces that were on display at Carlos Place … and is definitely worth looking at …

Thornton's Lilies - also in
"The Temple of Flora"

National Geographic has a site on Yaggy too ...


I really could have spent ages here ... but my schedule was 'pretty tight' ... I'd be off to the South Bank and Tate Modern once I'd left Carlos Place.


I hope you'll get a chance to look at the links - absolutely staggering what could be produced in earlier centuries ... and how much they could piece together ... we're lucky we can 'see' it so easily today.


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

43 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

As long as you have your memory you don't need great photos. Nice you got the place mostly to yourself.

Elephant's Child said...

Ooooh.
That would have been right up my alley. I adore old maps and am often fascinated by the incredible accuracy. I love the inaccuracies too - and have a particular weakness for the early maps with 'here be dragons' on uncharted waters.
Huge thanks for the links too.

Chatty Crone said...

I am surprised you had that place almost to yourself - the history there was amazing. I like maps too. It is amazing how they did mapping so long ago.

L. Diane Wolfe said...

What an opportunity to wander around by yourself.

Liz A. said...

That must have been fun to wander about by yourself.

Joanne said...

wow. I would have loved to join you on this jaunt. I love maps and such. I shall explore your links. Quite fabulous and glad you were out safely but pre-lockdown. Crazy times as you said - and who knows when will it settle into a "new" normal. Meanwhile - we can explore as blog friends and keep the brain churning. Take care

Botanist said...

Those old illustrations by cartographers, zoologists and botanists are true works of art. Since photography, nobody bothers with those skills any longer :(

Hels said...

Most of us are lucky to have talent in one area in our lives ...Ernest Haeckel was talented in heaps of areas, being an artist, illustrator, zoologist, anatomist, doctor of medicine and religious leader. Carlos Place seems to have a great collection!!

Denise Covey said...

This must have been a wonderful visit, Hilary. I especially liked the Cartographic ‘heavenly’ charts by Andreas Cellarius. So detailed.
Have a great week!

Susan Scott said...

Ooooh what a wonderful time you clearly had Hilary! Just up your street. I’ll check out your links thanks - best, susan

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
Yup, I'm on the map hound list too! I can spend many a happy hour poring over them... that link to the map house is dangerous!!! Some great images - love the temple of flora/lilies... YAM xx

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Alex – yes I do have those memories, which are enhanced via the blog posts. At least I wasn’t interrupted as I wandered around.

@ EC – I know … it was amazing … I’m so pleased I went to a Fashion House – where the exhibition of these antiquarian prints were on show. Excellent you’ll explore the links …

@ Sandie – I’m just glad I was on my own. I was only looking and anyone else would have been a client – much more important.

@ Diane – yes … actually having the opportunity to visit was special …

@ Liz – thanks at least I was free to do what I wanted …

@ Joanne – I’d have loved to have had you join me! Great you’ll explore the links … such fun to see more. Yes it was pre-lockdown, so I’m so glad I made the effort. As you say blogging can stimulate us … and definitely does for me …

@ Ian – I know it was amazing what those early illustrators and artists were able to portray for us … I think there are artists out there – it’s just different now and perhaps not necessary as the digital age seems to give us so many other approaches to visualising the world – that’s the talent now-a-days – I guess!

@ Hels – wish I had talent in one area … I’d love to be able to draw … so I really admire these early entrepreneurs and people who were polymaths with their arts. The Map House is the place to visit – Carlos Place is a marketing place … the fashion houses – Vogue etc

@ Denise – it was the first of many great visits that day … I agree looking at Andreas Cellarius’ cartographic charts are fascinating … I’d love to see more.

@ Susan – yes … suited me down to the ground – and I’m so glad you’ll check out the links. One day I’ll get to visit the Map House ..

@ Yam – great that you’ll also be looking at the Map House … save up some cash!! Like you I love botanical prints … Thornton’s ‘The Temple of Flora’ must be amazing to see in full.

Thanks so much for visiting and coming along with me on this journey … take care and stay safe - Hilary

Patsy said...

I do like an old mad – particularly if it's of somewhere I know and I'm able to see what has or hasn't changed. Even better though are ones which say 'here be dragons' or have other similarly helpful warnings.

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

You find the most interesting places and then share them with us with your great delivery! Loved seeing the beautiful old map and the pictures of the sea anemones and flowers, especially.

Jemi Fraser said...

Fascinating! I've always thought it takes a special type of brain (which I don't have) to travel on the surface and be able to draw the terrain from a bird's eye view. Wonderful photos!

Rachna Chhabria said...

Looks like you had a wonderful visit. The pictures are lovely!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi - Sheri Larsen also commented over on the previous post ... so I'll just put it up here for her:
You always have the most interesting posts, Hilary! Thank you for sharing all of this. Love, love the maps you showed us. I love anything from the past, history and the way it was.
https://writersally.blogspot.com/2020/08/coming-to-you-from-northern-new-england.html

@ Patsy ... I know old maps are always fun to look at, especially if they tell us about 'here be dragons!' ...which make them entertaining ...

@ Elizabeth - thank you - I can't go with others ... so tread my own path. Thank you re the 'delivery' of the post compliment - appreciate that. I love botanical prints of all the flora and fauna - especially those early ones - so meticulous.

@ Jemi - oh I could never draw like these early illustrators - and often pretty close to the way we'd recognise the area ... and bird's eye view - how they do it ... a different brain as you mention. Thank you ...

@ Rachna - this was the first of a few places I visited that day ... but I really wanted to go - so thank you re the images.

Take care all of you ... so pleased to see you here - Hilary

Chrys Fey said...

Being able to wander around by yourself is awesome. Seeing those things would've been neat. I appreciate the images you did get and shared with us. :)

Jacqui Murray said...

With your inquisitiveness, I think they were thrilled to have you there. What a joy.

Sandra Cox said...

What a wonderful place for a cafe. Notice where my first thoughts go. Heh. Those prints are magnificent.
Take special care.

cleemckenzie said...

That was a lovely adventure, Hilary, and a private one as well. Loved the art and those maps are art pieces in and of themselves. I understand your fascination with them.

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

Photos of any degree great or blurry can help keep a memory fresh. I liked this post

Lynda R Young as Elle Cardy said...

Oh my gosh, I love maps too. What a great experience!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Chrys - thanks at least I could take my time and not worry too much. The works of art are amazing - so I'm delighted you enjoyed the images I was able to capture, or find in Wiki ...

@ Jacqui - thanks ... I didn't do much enquiring! But I find it better to take my own approach to things and learn that way ...

@ Sandra - yes it'd have been lovely to have had some time to sit and linger ... but other exhibitions awaited me. The prints on show were beautiful ...

@ Lee - this first part was tempting to stay and spend some time ... but I needed to get on. I love botanical prints, as well as maps -especially those of the heavens ... but obviously earth too ...

@ Jo-Anne - thanks I was glad I was able to capture some reasonable photos reminding me of my visit ...

@ Lynda - yes ... at least it was a specialised small exhibit, which wasn't swamped with people ... always inhibits me when I look round.

Thanks to you all for visiting and commenting ... and enjoying the tour around Fashion with Antique prints ... a strange but true one ... stay safe - Hilary

Keith's Ramblings said...

Although I often visit the South Bank and the Tate Modern, I had no idea about Carlos Place. It's now on my must-visit list!

Deniz Bevan said...

Old maps! my favourite! I reeeally wish I could have travelled with you!

Inger said...

What a fantastic place, I wish I could have been there with you. I didn't know what rooves were, so I looked it up and thought I should have known. When I lived in London, there wasn't much on the south side. Modern things, like an embassy, as far as I remember. Of course there wasn't a single tall building either anywhere in London.

Sandra Cox said...

So many goodies. Isn't that heavenly charts breathtaking?

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Keith - Carlos Place is up off Grosvenor Square ... and you'll need to check if they've got a range of exhibits hanging up - it is a fashion house first and foremost ... but the Map House down in Kensington would make a fascinating place to visit.

@ Deniz - oh yes ... lots of them ... and the Map House in Beauchamp Place would be well worth a visit ... and I'd love you to join me sometime!

@ Inger - it was lovely and you'd have had so much fun here - sorry the Brit is here! You're right the South Side has really developed in the last 50 - 60 years and is a thrive of activity now - well was ... I hope it recovers once we're rid of the pandemic. Oh the tall buildings are another story ... and also what will happen to all that office space - who knows ...

We could have chewed the cud up in the cafe!!

@ Sandra - yes lots of things to look at and think about - those charts the ancient ones and the 20th ones are quite extraordinary ...

Thanks for being here - stay safe ... we're in for a hot weekend ... Hilary

Anabel Marsh said...

Much more interesting than fashion! Not my thing either, surprise, surprise…

retirementreflections said...

What an incredible visit, Hilary.
I agree with Anabel -- much more interesting than fashion.
And what a bonus to have the place (almost entirely) to yourself! Thank you for the links.

Linda said...

So nice that you could wander around freely at your own pace.

dolorah said...

I loved wandering around museums of any sort. Ah, remember the days we were able to go places and enjoy the world, lol.

Vallypee said...

Ooh, I'll have to take a look at those links, Hilary. I love maps too! I'm currently reading Laura Maiklem's Mudlarking book and she talks about panoramic maps that were drawn in the 17th century and which she uses to choose locations for her mudlarking. I'm finding it a fascinating book, and I'd love to see examples of those maps. Maybe your links will have som!

Erica/Erika said...

Did you get ‘special’ treatment because you used to work near that area? I am always in awe how ‘heavenly’ charts were created in the first place. It is incredible to see the effort, beauty and knowledge shared from past centuries. The Map House website is overwhelming. Yet, a great resource. Thank you for sharing helpful photos. A fascinating post, Hilary!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Anabel – yes I know … definitely I’d have walked away if they’d pressurised me … but they were impeccably polite.

@ Donna – I was so pleased I went and equally pleased I was able to wander around without a chaperone checking up on me …

@ Linda – yes I couldn’t spend long as I had lots of other visits planned …

@ Donna – I do too … yet I prefer to have a good look, get some information or some pictures and then do the other things I’d set out to do … and get home. The museums are opening … but I won’t be going to London any time soon … but it’ll be nice when we all feel comfortable with moving around again …

@ Val – the links are interesting … I particularly loved the Yaggy ones – he really must have helped kids and adults in America understand the world a bit better. But the prints and those maps – such works of art.

I remember Laura Maiklem’s Mudlarking book is much recommended – one day I’ll get to read it … but I won’t be wandering along the Thames mud flats either at the moment!

The Dutch were really clever at cartography and setting out their towns from a bird’s eye point of view in those early days – well I hope the links help with your research.

@ Erica – no I used to work there in the 1970s … so the organisation has long gone … I was intrigued to go back – but didn’t have enough time on this journey up to London.

I’m amazed at the moon charts, heavenly charts etc – as you say … so incredible to be able to reproduce them almost accurately all those years ago. Cellarius’ works are just stunning … so I agree with you about the ‘awe’ in their creation. I’m glad you had a look at the links …

Thanks so much – lovely having you here commenting – and obviously enjoying the content – stay safe … it’s hot here in a muggy Eastbourne!! All the best - Hilary

Sandra Cox said...

The majestic beasts print truly is majestic. So many wonders here.
Stay cool.

Empty Nest Insider said...

Hi Hilary, You are a great explorer whom always finds fascinating things to see and learn about. Thanks for taking us along on your private tour of interesting maps and artwork. Stay safe, healthy and curious, my friend!

Julie

Jz said...

I would have been tempted to see if I couldn't at least get a cup of tea out of them before I 'fessed up to only wanting to see the antiquarian exhibit. ;-p

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sandra - good to see you ... and yes 'the beasts' are just majestic.

@ Julie - well I wander along - looking at perhaps the unusual, rather than the more popular. It wasn't easy to see ... but one can always explore via the websites elsewhere ... that's what I love ... so good to see you ...

@ Jz - well I was tempted re lunch ... but I had a ticket for an exhibition at 4.30 and I was determined to achieve all I wanted to see ... so I skipped off - sadly. They were happy for me only to look round - the print exhibition had been promoted that way ...

Thanks for being here ... gosh is it hot here! I'm wilting ... and I'm by the sea ... stay safe - Hilary

DMS said...

Amazing that you had the place mostly to yourself. So many interesting pieces. It is astounding what people were able to piece together way back when. So many bit to take in and absorb. Thanks for sharing. :)
~Jess

Lynda Dietz said...

I've always been amazed at cartographers from centuries ago. Granted, some of the ancient maps were creative, to say the least, but many were so incredibly accurate for the limited resources of the time. We have it so easy now with satellite imagery to assist us.

What an interesting exhibition! Glad you had such a nice tour.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Jess - well it was a specialist fashion house - and I'm not sure how often it'd be overflowing - I guess their clients are very select and therefore few and far between - but with sufficient $$$ to buy some of the Map House's prints ...!!

@ Lynda - I agree ... to be able 'to see the mapped area' and then be able to translate it to paper or print - totally amazing. Wonderful they've stayed around all these centuries for us to see them - then the celestial ones too - the cartographers must have wonderful imaginations to be able to layer on what they could see.

We lose something by not looking at our surrounds now-a-days ... and just being directed, without thought ... it's easy - but perhaps over time may be a downfall.

I enjoyed the look around ... and once we're out of this 'mess' I'll check whether they've got something else on.

Thanks so much the two of you ... take care - Hilary