Saturday, 12 March 2016

Knickerbocker Glories … and Rhubarb, Rhubarb, Rhubarb …



Knickerbocker Glories … what are they and where did they start … so many of you have asked or commented on Jenny’s Knickerbocker Glories … 


Jenny concentrating  on her caramel style
KGB - at The Starter Bar, Ilfracombe -
part 13 of our West Country Tour
I thought I’d better make sure your visit sends you away, after you’ve commented of course, salivating happily ….



Essentially it is a layered cream sundae that is served in a tall conical glass to be eaten with a distinctive long spoon … a speciality of 1920s Britain.




It can be made with ice-cream, meringue, cream … and flavoured appropriately … with jelly, fruit and fruit purees, or chocolate ice-cream topped with chocolate sauce, or nuts and topped with a honey sauce, or caramel sauce …


Chocolate or fruit

You name it – and a variety will be created specifically for you … especially today when we have so many flavours of ice-cream available.



A Sundae dish ... here a banana, icecream,
fruits and ... 



Their generic term seems to be Sundae … but certainly as kids we’d occasionally have a Knickerbocker Glory – to get the big chunky glass with the long spoon … or then the banana split-sundae glass …






Wiki link here


However this Wisconsin historical marker declares that the Ice Cream Sundae was invented here at Two Rivers … and who am I to disagree … but I’ll keep the Knickerbocker Glory here in little ol’ England …




Early season rhubarb ... so pink and pretty
- grown indoors in the dark!

The rhubarb season seemed to have come early this year … wonderful pink stems with light green leaves – they’re poisonous!  So only lightly cook the chopped stems with some dark sugar … serve with custard or cream …


Rhubarb is one of those very English plants – quite often found in gardens … and it provides stems for use all through the Spring, Summer and early autumn … a free food too …


A crown of rhubarb - growing outside

… then preserve it, or freeze it (once poached or cooked), ready for use in tarts, pies, pudding, crumbles (oh so delicious) – spice it up with mixed spice, or add some glacé ginger … it can be made into wine, chutney, jam, jelly, marmalade … and so on …



Mrs Beeton confirms some of these ideas! … she features in Wiki today … and advises that it is one of the most useful of all garden plants … I wish someone had told Mr TCP (my uncle) – when I asked if he’d got a rhubarb crown … back came the answer … oh no! – I buried it under the compost heap – I can’t stand the stuff … presumably my aunt concurred!  I looked longingly at the compost heap every time I passed!


Rhubarb and custard tart
Rhubarb is one of those plants that perhaps is synomous with school dinners – we had it at home … so were well used to having it for pudding (as we called it) … rhubarb fool a delicious mix of rhubarb with custard …


I have a few cookbooks as many of you will know ... and so searched for an interesting recipe – the Persian cookbook had one … “Rhubarb Stew” …



The book I used ... there was no picture of
Khoresht-e Reevâs
According to Margaret Shaida the Zoroastrian religion of ancient Iran, the human race was born of the rhubarb plant … this I can see will cause a few problems and questions … so I’ll move on … to other notes she gives us …


…. From ancient times rhubarb has been considered good for cleansing the blood and purifying the system.  When it arrived in England its medicinal properties were also highly valued … but only the last 100 years or so has it been consumed for pleasure ... when it was welcomed as the first fruit of summer – even though technically it is a vegetable.


... no photo - so I give you Rhubarb Crumble
So here the Persian dish “Khoresht-e Reevâs" is a pretty dish, the pink and red rhubarb affording a lovely contrast to the dark-green herbs.  Traditionally it is served in Iran to aid digestion - it is reassuring to know it is good for you!


I love Persian recipes … where there’s a hint of fruit in a meat stew as here … the dish consists of boned leg of lamb, chopped up, chopped onions, fresh parsley, fresh mint, some rhubarb and seasoning, which are added near the end – so the fruit doesn’t disintegrate …


Another KBG ... 


So here’s to a very pretty pink vegetable usually used as a dessert … and the ubiquitous Knickerbocker Glory or Sundae – depending on the style of dish … KBGs can be pink, white and creamy, chocolatey, toffee, caramel coloured … so many flavours now.




One always needs Cornish Clotted Cream with any dessert,
even with Knickerbocker Glories - this is a postcard

Well I shall at some stage try the rhubarb stew … I like the piquancy of the tart flavour with a rich lamb stew … 


... or how about oatmeal- coated mackerel with rhubarb sticks ... see link below ... 


... but for now I shall leave you drooling, or revolted at the thought of rhubarb per Mr TCP …



A very early post ... when I wrote about asparagus and rhubarb

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's new season rhubarb recipes ... per The Guardian


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

58 comments:

A Heron's View said...

You are extremely naughty in posting up these mouth watering delicious desserts, none of which I am allowed to officially eat and that unfortunately also means Cornish clotted cream ! However I also live with the premise that 'rules are meant to be broken' otherwise there would be no point in having them :)

You seem to have omitted from your list the Banana Split which I used to consume as a boy in a wonderful ice cream parlour at St. Ives in Cornwall.

Karen Walker said...

Yes, I agree, very naughty. That sundae looks so scrumptious. Not sure about rhubarb, though.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Mel - yes - I'm sorry if I'm serving up tempting treats that are disallowed - but the occasional taste is good. I'd sort of half thought about Banana Split .. but was concentrating on Jenny's Knickerbocker Glories - that seemed to amuse as the West Country Tour took place ... I shall have to address that error anon! Probably after the A-Z ... so May is not really that far away is it?!

@ Karen - oh rhubarb is just wonderful ... I love it! The KBGs or Sundaes are delicious .. but I usually avoid desserts if I can ...

Thought I'd better put a note in re the Banana Splits .. they are good too .. cheers to you both - Hilary

Anabel Marsh said...

Not a big pudding fan - but rhubarb crumble and custard is one I love. Can take or leave (probably leave, unless eating to keep others company*) the sundaes.

*See-through excuse.

The Glasgow Gallivanter

Botanist said...

I remember, as a kid, the Knickerbocker Glory or banana split being the ultimate luxury treat on those rare occasions when we went to a restaurant for a meal.

I guess rhubarb must have followed settlers over to Canada. We have some growing wild in the depths of the jungle we call a back yard. And I occasionally buy a rhubarb and strawberry pie from the store. It sounds an odd combination but it is delicious.

D.G. Hudson said...

I discovered rhubarb when I moved to Canada and met hubs. His parents had a rhubarb patch in their garden. I like it mixed with custard, or with strawberries. Haven't had it for a while now, now that you mention it. . .and those sundaes look yummy.

M Pax said...

My dad grew rubarb. My mom makes the best strawberry rubarb pie. Yum.

That would be a great filling for a Knickerwhatever glory. :) Mmm. Cream and rubarb pie.

Lowcarb team member said...

Oh this so reminds me of my Dear Mum ... she loved Knickerbocker Glories and she adored rhubarb - her rhubarb crumbles were legendary within the family!

Cornish Clotted Cream is simple amazing too...

... and I can remember my Mum's Mrs Beeton's cook book, it wouldn't be home without one!

Sorry to reminisce but words, pictures just sometimes start great thoughts and memories don't they?

Hope your weekend is going well

All the best Jan

Nilanjana Bose said...

The KBG's look out of this world! I remember the banana split and various other sundaes from childhood too, major treat during the summer holidays when at the grandparents and one of the relatives could be badgered to take us out to get them. Don't think I could tackle the three scoop one anymore in one sitting though.

I love Persian food, too - their recipes use a lot of sweet/tart fruits for flavouring. Another one is pomegranate - we use that at home as well. Didn't know that we started from a rhubarb plant though! :)

Enjoyed reading your post as always, ice cream, crumbles and fools, what's not to love? :)

Hope you're having an awesome weekend.

Patsy said...

I grow rhubarb and always enjoy the first few helpings of tender pink stems in the spring. By the time the strawberries start to ripen at the end of May I'll have had quite enough of it to last me until the following spring.

Shammickite said...

I had loads of rhubarb at my previous house and none here, boo hoo! And I love it, luckily I have a friend who gave me a lot last year, I hope she remembers to do the same this year.

Out on the prairie said...

When I first planted rhubarb I put in 3 crowns. My grandmother laughed and asked why so little.I make a pudding that has fruit on the bottom, a cake like batter , and butter and boiling water over the top that when baked is hard to stop eating.I love it in pie, with or without some strawberries. It will be a long time before we eat it here.

Karen Jones Gowen said...

Oh my but those ice cream knickerbocker glories look delicious!!! It's an interesting name but when I see the photos my head says ice cream sundae. Although I imagine there are slight differences. The rhubarb recipes make my mouth water too and remind me of my mother who always planted rhubarb and asparagus in every home she lived. Early spring those two would adorn our dinner tables, the asparagus with the meal the rhubarb as dessert. Love rhubarb in any way, shape or form!

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

We like to claim everything I guess. Sorry. But I do enjoy a good sundae.
We did invent the Chinese Fortune Cookie.
Never a fan of rhubarb. Of course, never had it that often.

Elephant's Child said...

I adore rhubarb (known in our family as thumb after a brother's mishap while chopping it). Thumb and custard was a much loved dessert. And I have rhubarb (as well as fairies) at the bottom of my garden.
Never warmed to the KBG. Love Persian food though.

Friko said...

You’ve covered rhubarb extensively in all its guises but one thing you have left out: the foolproof way of getting good rhubarb and what to put on the rhubarb bed to give you these succulent gems. Yes?, got it? Manure. Horse manure at that, or so I’ve been told.

Mike @ A Bit About Britain said...

I remember my mother banging on about knickerbocker glories - but they were/are pretty awesome. Didn't Wimpy Bars used to serve them? Your take on humans springing from rhubarb has left my head reeling; I need a bit of a lie-down now.

H.R. Sinclair, Southpaw said...

The Knickerbocker Glory looks so fantastic. I'm ready for one with rhubarb! A popular summer pie over her is strawberry and rhubarb. So tasty!

Susan said...

Hello Hilary. The sundaes look yummy. Guess they are a culinary sensation wherever they are served! We have rhubarb here only in the spring. It's delicious in pies, mixed with strawberries and, of course, sweetened. Susan

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Anabel – I too try and avoid desserts … but family lunches I’m happy to join in … especially if rhubarb features. I rarely eat ice-cream in any format … but yes * if there’s an excuse I’ll join in …

@ Ian – I think we probably did the same … the knickerbocker glory was a treat – and we didn’t eat out often …

If you look at Friko’s comment … you’ll see that rhubarb might well survive quite well on the journey over .. plenty of manure around! Rhubarb and strawberry pie seem to be the order of the day …

@ DG – well I’m glad rhubarb and custard impressed you when you and hubs met up … strawberries again I see … on occasion a KBG or sundae is really good …

@ Mary – wonderful to know your father grew rhubarb, and that strawberry and rhubarb pie again. Yes I agree for the KBG a good filling of rhubarb and cream etc …

@ Jan – no worries re reminiscing … I do too – our rhubarb at home and then Mr TCP (my uncle) and his long buried patch …

I’m so glad I gave you some happy memories … clotted cream, Mrs Beeton’s cook book … I got mine out for a quick look for this post. Lovely memories …

@ Nila – the KGBs and sundaes are a thing of our past … perhaps that’s what Jenny was fulfilling … her memories of her days growing up in England. They were her first choice!

I too love Persian food and exactly as you confirm their sweet/tart fruits for flavouring … I had a pomegranate tree in South Africa and used to occasionally make dishes using the jewel seeds …

The rhubarb start in life for humans – had to put that in .. and so pleased you had a happy read …

@ Patsy – I imagined you’d have rhubarb – those tender early shoots are delicious aren’t they – even if they’re not the ones grown in the dark and shipped down from Yorkshire. Fresh from the crown in the garden = perfect.

I have to say I wouldn’t eat strawberries with rhubarb – strawberries freshly picked are too delicious … but pie seems to abound …

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Shammickite – thanks for the visit. I hope your friend will give you lots of rhubarb this year … it does like being picked – so no worries there, new stems will appear ..

@ OOTP – I guess your grandmother used her rhubarb a lot and had a big family to feed up. Your upside down cake-pudding sounds delicious … and yes the mix of cake and a poached fruit under layer is especially good especially when freshly cooked and the aroma filling the kitchen – with custard?! I just love rhubarb … so am always glad when I’m given some …

@ Karen – the KBGs are always good to look at, tasty to eat – and something I try and avoid! I guess it’s just a mix of the names – the old country v the new.

How fantastic you had asparagus and rhubarb at all your homes as you were growing up – they’re such delicious vegetables – albeit we tend to eat rhubarb as a dessert. Good – delighted to read rhubarb is a favourite …

@ Alex – yes we do feel somewhat ‘downed’ when everything is Americanised .. but so be it … I’m happy to read you’ll enjoy a good sundae occasionally. Pity about the rhubarb … and I’m not keen on Fortune Cookies – no idea why – so I’ll match you with that …

@ EC – oh what fun … thumb and custard – yes I can see that … mine would be thumb cheese on toast – but that’s another story.

Thumb and custard with fairies sounds a very good mix for the bottom of the garden … I’m not that enamoured with KGBs – but they entice occasionally … but Persian food – I’d always go for.

@ Friko – well I sort of tried to cover rhubarb in all which ways – but failed with the horse manure aspect – I guess that’s why it’s survived for so long .. on the journey over from Siberia or Asia originally and over the Ocean waves to the States. I can’t remember what’s needed for asparagus … perhaps another post coming up after the A-Z for that …

@ Mike – I believe you might be right re KnickerBocker Glories and Wimpy Bars – our first fast food-burger ‘restaurants’ … ours was Waterloo Station! Funny how our memories are jogged … perhaps that’s where the Iranian thoughts on human creation came from … I just quoted from the book!! I hope your lie-down helped you recover from this major fact of life?!

@ Holly – the KBGs went down a storm as we travelled round … and yes the States does seem to love their summer pie of rhubarb and strawberries …

@ Susan – good to see you .. the sundaes do look good and they were a treat after the War when we were well and truly rationed for sweets etc. Definitely need to sweeten rhubarb, but as you mention it is oh so good … in pies …

As a general comment I can’t quite get my head round Rhubarb and Strawberry pies … fresh strawberries are just so delicious on their own … but the mixture of rhubarb and strawberries seems to be fairly common now … just not for me!! Sorry!

Cheers to you all – it is definitely getting lighter and warmer … and the plants are growing fast … which will be just amazing when the cold actually goes … chill is fine – it is fresh. Hilary

Vallypee said...

I love rhubarb too, Hilary, but didn't know it had half as many uses. Wonderful!! I shall have to grow some in pots!

A Heron's View said...

Raw rhubarb is excellent for cleaning the burnt bottoms of saucepans, just a few stalks and covered with a little water, bring to the boil and bingo your pan is as good as new.
The drawback is that you cannot eat the rhubarb afterwards.

Suzanne Furness said...

What a feast, Hilary! I do love a choc nut sundae. There is a little retro style cafe in Scarborough where my husband used to visit as a boy. The speciality was knickerbocker Glory and Peach Melba. We took our girls when they were much younger and found the same place still there. Of course we had to sample a few!
Rhubarb is delicious, you remind me I have some in the freezer, I must dig it out and use it before the new crop. We had lots in our garden last year and took to making rhubarb gin with some . . . another idea to add to your list of uses for rhubarb perhaps.

Elsie Amata said...

Is it wrong to want a sundae for breakfast? I mean no one is awake yet so no one will know...hmmm. I don't recall if I've ever had rhubarb although I remember my mom being a fan of rhubarb pie. Until today though, I 'd never heard of knickerbocker glory, I'd try it!

Joanne said...

I love the word Knickerbocker, but rhubarb is harsh sounding. My father liked the rhubarb pie his mother made for him. Me - not so keen. Maybe I need to revisit the taste after all of these years. Fun post!

Jo said...

As you know, I am a devotee of asparagus. The farm where I buy it also has wonderful rhubarb which I also buy sometimes. We had a rhubarb crown in our yard (garden) when we first came to Canada but Matt is like TCP and doesn't like the stuff and it mostly wasn't worth cooking it just for me so he dug the plant out.

Haven't had a KBG for many a long year. I think the last time was in Lyons in London. One of those big restaurants they opened - are they still there? The food used to be great. They had carveries too. I'm not sure I would even try one today. Too many calories

L.G. Smith said...

Hello Hilary! Never heard the term "knickerbocker glory." That sundae would about do me in, though. :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Val - oh that's good ... and as Suzanne mentions we could have rhubarb gin. Good idea to have a crown in a pot - a big pot, I suggest.

@ Mel - I remembered about cleaning saucepans and have used it for that - granted the rhubarb might need the compost heap ... but clean saucepan and more rhubarb to be found nearby ...

I wasn't sure if I put soap powder with the rhubarb for cleaning the saucepans .. but looks unlikely ...

@ Suzanne - it was a happy post to write up and I agree a few nuts on the top or honeycomb adds a little bite. That's great the two of you took your kids up to Scarborough to check out your hubby's old haunts - to find the cafe still there. Peach Melbas were favourites too ...

I bet you all enjoyed each and every sundae you tried ... fun memories .. and the kids know their Dad's cafe ...

Rhubarb gin sounds delicious ... and yes time for a rhubarb crumble to finish up 2015's crop ... and then on with the new batch ...

The rhubarb gin is on the list here ...

@ Elsie - no .. I don't think so ... just sometimes we need to indulge our food fantasies. Knickerbocker Glory and Sundae are much the same I think - but I love the glass and long spoon ...

Rhubarb is an acquired taste .. but perhaps try some with memory to your mother?

@ Joanne - yes Knickerbocker Glory is a good name isn't it .. but rhooobarb, rhooobarb, rhooobarb ... are some good chattery words! Give it a go .. it's really good and is good for you ...

@ Jo - I do know your devotion to asparagus - ah well, if you've no rhubarb now ... I guess you can get some when you go to your farm and indulge your memories for Rhubarb.

KBGs are not something I have ... and in fact didn't have one when we were travelling ... I was trying to avoid the puds! Lyons have all gone now ... Carveries in pubs are still around ... sometimes good, sometimes not so good - pile 'em high and hope for the best - but doesn't always taste brilliant. But good memories of those days gone by ...

@ LG - how lovely to see you again ... well you can swap the name ... but just had to write up the British v the American/Canadian ..

Cheers to you all - hope Sunday lunch comes along soon for some of you! Hilary

Ann Best said...

What delicious sundaes! And as usual, such an interesting history. And rhubarb...I've had a rhubarb pie once in my life, and loved it. Jen doesn't think she would :( but then if I could make it taste delicious. And the fact that you can freeze it....wish I had a garden but I'm sure I could find some in the local store.

Thank you as always for a wonderful post. And thanks for leaving a comment on my Joseph Benaly story. So glad you liked it.

Have a wonderful Sunday ((( ))) from your friends across the pond...

http://anncarbinebest.com

Liza said...

You have made me hungry. And I love the name Knickerbocker Glory!

L. Diane Wolfe said...

We grew rhubarb when I was a kid. I absolutely love rhubarb pies, but they are hard to find here.

Julie Flanders said...

Not a fan of rhubarb so I didn't get tempted there but I'm dying for a Knickerbocker Glory. And with clotted cream! That would have to be sinfully delicious.

A Cuban In London said...

Would you believe it? I had one the other day. I usually take my time with the sundae. I let the ice-cream melt till it mixes with the chocolate at the bottom... Blimey, I'm hungry now. Better go and rummage in the cupboard.

Greetings from London.

Pearson Report said...

Hi Hilary - what a scrumptious post - I was liking my chops all the way through. Those KBG's look amazing - can't imagine the calorie count - but, hey... in my dreams I'm having one tonight.

As to rhubarb - I grew up with it in our garden and on our table - I've had it in all the various ways you've described in your post. At present I don't have it in my garden due to my renovations - but it will be making a comeback soon.

Sending smiles and happy thoughts your way. xxoo

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Ann - I'm glad you enjoyed it .. and that perhaps you'll look out for some rhubarb to give it a try again ... with some delicious runny custard - is so good to pour over the poached 'fruit'. Jen might enjoy the lamb dish .. as it's got a green herby topping!

On the other hand KBGs or sundaes are delicious aren't they - your Joseph Benaly story was very interesting ..

@ Liza - thank you .. and Knickerbocker Glory is a good name isn't it ...

@ Diane - I expect rhubarb grows better in colder climates ... but at least you've tried it ... and love it ...

@ Julie - rhubarb is a bit like marmite - a decisive like or not flavour. Few people won't eat a KBG on occasion .. especially with Cornish cream ... I can't resist ... and is sinfully delicious

@ ACIL - well it is getting spring-like in the weather isn't it ... so I don't blame you for enjoying one. Sounds a great choice ... leaving the ice-cream to mix with the chocolate. Hope you found something satisfactory to guzzle ...

@ Jenny - good to see you - well we don't think about the calorie count do we - if we're having a treat. Yes often in my dreams too ...

That's good to know you'll be putting a crown into your revamped garden, once the renovations are finished off ... it's such an easy plant to have around and will always provide an easy dessert ...

Thanks for all your thoughts and smiles and wishes ...

The same to you all - see you soon .. cheers Hilary

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

Even though I just ate a *huge* breakfast...that looks so amazing! Feeling hungry again. :)

cleemckenzie said...

That desert made me salivate again! However, it's only nine in the morning my time, so I'll have to wait to satisfy my craving for anything with ice cream or meringue. Or not. My mom's not here to say no, so I might just have to indulge.

As to rhubarb...it's one of my all time favorite things to grow. Last year I planted some new plants, but no soon had they begun to grow than the deer came into the garden and demolished them. Poisonous! I didn't find any deer carcasses though, so I'm not sure what to make of the vanished rhubarb.

Sherry Ellis said...

Your post is appealing to my sweet tooth! It's been so long since I've had a ice cream sundae!

Silvia Villalobos said...

Oh, best post I've seen in some time. So much goodness in images and descriptions. So many different flavors, and such pretty colors to go with it. In addition ... interesting to learn the rhubarb plant has so many different uses .. indeed reassuring to know that beside being so yummy in various forms, it is also good for us. Thank you.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

We always had rhubarb growing up. I like it raw but my mother and aunts were great at making stew and pies. I used to grow it in my garden but I didn't take it with me when I moved 20 years ago.

beste barki said...

We used to eat ice cream sundaes in Istanbul when I was young. We knew that it was European but I had no ideae they were British. How wonderful Hilary.

Dianne K. Salerni said...

The Knickerbocker Glory looks like a massive sugar overload! Yikes! I know they are almost the same as an ice cream Sundae, but gosh they sound even more decadent, just from the name. :)

DMS said...

I am so happy to officially know what a Knickerbocker Glory is now. The name is so much more fun than sundae. :) They look so tasty and the long spoon is certainly a fun touch. I have had rhubarb pie before, but I had no idea just how tricky (and poisonous) parts of it are. Thanks for sharing! :)
~Jess

Susan J. Reinhardt said...

Hi, Hilary - I'll take a chocolate sundae! Anything chocolate sends me tearing through the cabinets. LOL!

Would you believe I've never tasted rhubarb? I'm not sure I'm that brave.

Truedessa said...

A banana split I haven't had one of those in so long. My grandparents used to take us to this little ice cream barn. It was always such a treat.

Guilie Castillo said...

I'm shamefully unfamiliar with rhubarb, HIllary—but after reading your post I'm going to find a recipe to try it... If, of course, I can find it here in the island :) I really enjoyed the sundae history, too!
Guilie @ Quiet Laughter

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

Oh my Lord! They look so good! I love rhubarb. I can still smell the kitchen soak in rhubarb scents when my mother would can it. We had wild patches in the back 40. She made the best rhubarb ketchup. So delicious!

Shannon Lawrence said...

I've only ever used rhubarb for strawberry rhubarb pie, but there's a rhubarb farm in Black Forest, about 20 minutes north of me, so I've been wanting to take the kids to harvest there. This is a timely post! I'm going to have to make the kids KBGs! I'm a chocolate girl all the way, though...

D Biswas said...

I think I've put on weight just reading your post! Yums!


www.damyantiwrites.com.

Lynn said...

Now I want one of those - oh my. Next visit to the UK I'll be asking everyone where I can get the KBG. :) I loved the clotted cream - you can get it in the US, but it just doesn't seem the same.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Elizabeth – sorry about the extra temptation …

@ Lee – salivation does give us away doesn’t it ... so easy to get those taste beds going! It’s early here … and I have to follow your leadership – no ice-cream at this time of day …

Rhubarb – that’s wonderful to see you’ve planted some new plants – oh dear, those deer! It’s the leaves .. but as so often some parts of plants are poisonous to us humans, animals and insects are much cleverer and just avoid, or adapt … clever beasties …

@ Sherry – thankfully I don’t have a sweet tooth .. but get tempted occasionally ..

@ Silvia – I’m happy you approve of the post and its contents. There are so many flavours … and rhubarb is a wonder plant I think … it has a constant growth and so will always provide stems through most of the year …

@ Susan – gosh I’ve never eaten it raw … new shoots perhaps yes, but ones I’d stew (quickly cook up with some water and a little sugar) – I think I’d cook not eat raw. Sorry you didn’t take the plant with you ... but I guess the farm shops stock it …

@ Beste – well I suspect ice-cream in various guises appeared in different countries at much the same time … just the names are slightly different – and the effect of the tall glass full of deliciousness …

@ Dianne – I’m sure it’s a sugar overload .. but yes Knickerbocker Glory is a well chosen name isn’t it – where it came from I’ve no idea!

@ Jess – yes it has a better ring to it … ordering a Knickerbocker Glory could give us lots of creative thoughts … you need a long spoon to get down to that last taste in the glass.
Only the leaves of rhubarb are not good for us … the rest is just wonderful …

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan – chocolate sundae – that would suit most of us now-a-days wouldn’t it … Rhubarb is delicious ... stewed fruit … with some custard or some cream is very good indeed …

@ Truedessa – I didn’t mention banana split – that would have sent us all off in different directions – but they’re good too. I’m glad it brought back happy memories for you with your grandparents and those treat visits …

@ Guilie – you might be able to find tinned (canned) rhubarb perhaps … but one day you’ll remember to try some rhubarb and perhaps even buy some. I had to satisfy the sundae history v knickerbocker glory history story …

@ Joylene – they do look good don’t they – thankfully .. the summer season is coming and perhaps the odd ice-cream is allowed …? Wonderful I helped you remember those aromas escaping from your mother's kitchen … bottled is what we’d call canned … a really good way of storing extra fruits. Rhubarb ketchup now that is a new one … interesting addition – I think I’d enjoy that …

@ Shannon – that’s excellent that I’ve stirred the memory bank for a trip with your kids to the farm and then to pick rhubarb. I hope you’ve got the tall glass for the KBGs – the kids will love them … chocolate is for me too usually …

@ Damyanti – sorry .. the calories go on fast don’t they …

@ Lynn – quite a few restaurants or ice-cream parlours will have KBGs – that’s where we found them in Devon and Cornwall …

I gather clotted cream in the States and Canada is different from our Cornish clotted cream … different cows, and pastures and probably way of making it …

Cheers to you all – I didn’t think this post would have you all salivating quite so much! - Hilary

Deniz Bevan said...

I've only ever read about Knickerbocker Glories in books - I should definitely have one next time we visit the UK!

Aww, Mrs Beeton! I first heard about her from Jeeves and Wooster :-)

Karen Lange said...

Well, you are right, I am now hungry for something sweet. Perhaps the next time I have company over, we'll have to make some Knickerbocker Glories. :) As for rhubarb, haven't had it since I was young. My grandmother grew it, and of course cooked it for us. At the time I didn't care for it, but I suspect I might enjoy it more now as an adult. Thanks for all the lovely and delicious details! Enjoy your weekend!

Jeffrey Scott said...

Thanks for the info on the Knickerbocker. Nice to see Wisconsin get a shout out. I shall have to visit Two River sometime this year. I usually pass it on my way to Egg Harbour.

Back when I was a kid, I used to see Rhubarb grow wild all over the neighbourhood. I never developed much of a taste for it, but everyone rounded it up and made rhubarb pie in the summer.

Denise Covey said...

I'm salivating! Knickerbocker Glory! What a name! I used to love fruity sundaes as a kid. Now I drink iced coffee at times, which looks a bit like a Knickerbocker Glory the way my barista makes it. Scoops of house made vanilla icecream over ice with espresso drizzled over it. Yummo! And I do love rhubarb, especially in a crumble in winter.

I just caught your post at Karen Lange's. Glad I did!

Denise :-)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Deniz - ah .. that's good - KBGs seem to be on many menus - I was quite surprised: but sure hope you enjoy your tastings thereof.

Mrs Beeton is a stalwart ... she was amazing at what she accomplished in her short life. I'm sure I noted the Mrs Beeton reference .. but as it was 'normal' for me ... I didn't take much notice I guess - just enjoyed the stories of Jeeves and Wooster ...

@ Karen - yes .. it's difficult reading about others' recipes and dishes - without wishing it was another time of day - so I could eat!

I'm sure you'd enjoy rhubarb now ... it's such a versatile fruit .. and mixes well. But am glad I brought back memories of your grandmother and the times you shared with her ...

@ Jeffrey - oh that's great .. you'll go and visit Two Rivers and then you can tell us about the plaque and its content re Sundaes. I now see where Egg Harbor and Two Rivers 'sit' in Wisconsin ... good for my geography!

Interesting about rhubarb growing wild ... it's not something we see here in the UK - that I'm aware of. Brilliant that people took advantage of the wild bounty for some pies.

@ Denise - yes, just the thought of KBGs gladdens the soul - we had ice-cream for dessert last night ... and it was too cold for me! I had cold fruit salad instead! But summer days ... a lovely KBG is good once in a while ...

Iced coffee - we had that as kids .. and yes I've seen the 'posh' iced coffees they serve up now - your barista- made one .. sounds delicious.

Rhubarb crumble is delicious ... Thanks re the thumbs up for Karen's interview post .. cheers Hilary