Tuesday, 1 March 2016

West Country Tour – Wrap up and Summary … part 23 …



The wrap up … some things I forgot … and some reminders of things we came across …
 
Emily in 1920


… the most important person is Emily Hobhouse (1860 – 1926) who inspired her great niece, Jenny, to want to travel some of the routes that Emily would have trod, or more likely ridden.






Emily - aged about 5 on the left
With her sister Maud





From this journey … we have seen a little of Emily’s work – her early life in north Cornwall, then her brief visit to America, her involvement with the Boer War in South Africa …






… then the way she endeavoured to bring peace in World War One, a founding influencer of The Save the Children Fund and her final years, including that recognition by the peoples of South Africa for all she had done – yet was still unacknowledged by the British Government …


This my 'famous' map for you all!

 Jenny set the route … I fixed various hotels – so we encountered a very interesting set of nightly accommodations … definitely not your basic square box … one or two definitely ‘odd’ – and one or two wonderful, especially with friends and family.


A stylised representation of the Spanish Armada -
'our' Admirals, explorers and navigators encountered
in the fishing harbours of the west country, almost certainly
travelled the ocean ways

Through the series' posts I’ve introduced you to many a subject … covering social history, geology, history, people (writers, poets, artists), myths and legends, customs and traditions, trade routes, local peoples – fishermen, pirates, explorers and navigators, lots of visitors from Princes to Admirals, and now walkers or tourists galore …


Bodmin Moor


Devon fields in the snow

Each part covers a different aspect of our journey … landscape, food, friends and family, stories and history … the surroundings and coastline set the scene …



Badgworthy Water,  Malmsmead - a pack horse
bridge alongside a ford
… tiny inlets, rough misty Moors, bubbling rushing streams, hanging valleys, ancient churches, even older Neolithic settlements, tracks and paths establishing routes in all directions across the fragile countryside and fracturing coasts …




Drizzlecombe Menhir
Two things that spring to mind from the comments are your love of menhirs or dolmen, or standing stones … 

... and the range of the tides … which we take so much for granted here … but I reassure you – you are in good company … our tidal range, two thousand years ago, stumped Julius Caesar for a while … til he once again came, saw and conquered … and here we all are today …



… oh yes and food, glorious food!


The icing sugar model
So to start with … the icing sugar model of HMS Rhododendron in Liskeard Museum (part 7) – Mel from A Heron’s View gave me the low-down:

… she was built by Harland & Wolfe finished in 1940  then HMS RHODODENDRON Paid-off after VJapan Day and was placed in Reserve after de-storing. The ship was placed on the Disposal List and sold in 1950 to a shipping company. She traded under the name MAJ FINKE and was sold for demolition in South Africa in 1968.


The welcoming site of the Old Inn, Drewsteignton

I am a savoury-loving ‘lady’ … so the two dishes I forgot to post from our first night at the Old Inn Drewsteignton were:




Saffron Lasagne



Saffron Lasagne of crab and red peppers, served with a roasted shellfish veloute



The Sea Bass


Grilled fillet of sea bass with scallops, caramelised endive and vanilla sauce






Shelley’s Bridal Song … I’d snapped the original in the bar at the Rising Sun Hotel, Lynmouth … but didn’t post because I wanted to put up the poem itself:

The golden gates of Sleep unbar
Where Strength and Beauty, met together,
Kindle their image like a star
In a sea of glassy weather!


Shelley's Bridal Song
Night, with all thy stars look down,--
Darkness, weep thy holiest dew,--
Never smiled the inconstant moon
On a pair so true.
Let eyes not see their own delight;--
Haste, swift Hour, and thy flight
Oft renew.


Fairies, sprites, and angels, keep her!
Holy stars, permit no wrong!
And return to wake the sleeper,
Dawn,—ere it be long!
O joy! O fear! what will be done
In the absence of the sun!
Come along! 


Lover of Words at Castlepinesnorth Blogspot directs us to art … but inadvertently took us, via the Wyeth family, to an explanation of tides …


Andrew Wyeth’s quote: “I’m not interested in quiet, placid landscapes. Nature is not lyrical and nice.  In Maine I’d lie on my belly for an hour watching the tide rising, creeping slowly over everything … Nothing can stop it – amazing – sad.”

On the way to the Downs - looking over the low tide
at Eastbourne ... see link below



We here in England, when the tide is never far away, are ruled by it … if we want to experience our coast … it rushes in changing, over time, the shape of Britain … 





... or just gently, but inexorably, always appears every six hours or so … fairly clearly explained in my T for Tides, Trades of the tide, Tourism … of our A-Z in 2014.


The Sailor’s Prayer is to be found in Minehead at St Peter’s Mission Chapel at the Quay …


at St Peter's Mission Chapel
Pray God, Lead us
Pray God, speed us,
From all evil defend us,
Well to fish and well to haul
And what he pleases to give us all
A fine night to land our nets
And may we do well with all we gets,
Pray God, keep us from sand and shoal
And grant that each may have fair dole.
Pray God, hear our prayer.





So to finish this last post on our tour around the West Country – which opened so many doors of interest … I give you our guide with a final dessert … Jenny and one of her Knickerbockerglory desserts …


Some links: 


Z is for Tidal Zones from the A-Z in April 2014


West Country Tour part 7: - Liskeard

Emily's Story - my post on her life: 


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

60 comments:

Carole Anne Carr said...

What an amazing summary. I can rarely travel, have to arrange so much for my husband to cope, and it is great to travel with you.

Annalisa Crawford said...

So much that you didn't have room for! Oh wow, I want to try that Knickerbockerglory - it's huge!

Nilanjana Bose said...

Love, love, love the poetry. So cool.

The knickerbockerglory looks seriously, massively yum. Though the seafood doesn't look too bad either.

What an awesome experience to be able to trace your ancestor's journeys!

Happy March, Hilary.

Joanne said...

the lyrical poetry of your post tided me over from week to week. And that dessert looks glorious. You fed our eyes with fabulous pictures. Thanks so much for the journey. I learned and appreciated a lot. Cheers to you and Jenny (and Emily too)

Paula Kaye said...

Thank you for taking me along on your journey. I loved the pictures and all the wonderful descriptions. Especially the food!!

Out on the prairie said...

It has been a wonderful journey, I enjoyed all of this trip. The foods were fantastic and I would have enjoyed watching her eat that dessert.

Patsy said...

What a great tour. Thanks for sharing it with us, Hilary.

Drizzlecombe is a wonderful name and I'm fondof standing stones, so that's another one for my list! The place which served that massive Knickerbocker glory should really go on their too, although we might need to order one with two spoons to stand a chance of geting through it.

A Heron's View said...

Hilary,
I thoroughly enjoyed your tour that covered some of boyhood haunts and the delicious sea food meals, must not forget the Knickerbocker Glory which made me quite envious.
Where are we going next ? :)

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

That dessert is huge! All of the food looks good. I'd eat crab lasagne.

Elephant's Child said...

You have taken us on some incredible journeys. Thank you.
Mind you, I suspect if I consumed that knickerbockerglory, the size of my knickers would have to increase to inglorious levels.

Suzanne Furness said...

That Knickerbocker glory is a dessert and a half!
What a wonderful tour you have taken, so many memories to reflect upon.

Anabel Marsh said...

Tremendous, Hilary, a series to be proud of but you haven't disclosed whether Jenny actually ate that dessert. It's almost as big as she is!
The Glasgow Gallivanter

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Carole Anne – I know you are doing a tremendous job looking after your husband and travelling will be so difficult … but I’m so glad you’re happy to be here vicariously travelling …

@ Annalisa – oh! I had lots more I didn’t put in … but enough is enough … and then there’s more to find out. The Knickerbockerglories Jenny enjoyed were a sight to behold!

@ Nila – so glad I put the song and the prayer in … I wanted to include those … but decided my summary would do ..

Seafood to start with and knickerbockerglory to finish with – sounds good to me!

This is all Jenny’s doing and her family … I’m an in-law x times removed … still I can appreciate the history ..

@ Joanne – I so appreciate you enjoying my posts and am so happy the posts have tided you over during the last three months or so …

It’s been fun putting up the pictures to match each post … and then to add the scripts to match – delighted you learnt lots … so good to hear – and Jenny and I are both pleased – I’m sure Emily so too …

@ Paula – delighted to have you along … and I’m glad the pictures embellish the story line of the West Country .. and the food – well what else can one say …

@ Steve – thanks so much … so delighted you’ve enjoyed my writing and the photos … and yes I did enjoy Jenny enjoying herself ..

@ Patsy – so pleased you’ve added places in to your list to visit … and isn’t Drizzlecombe a wonderful name – so had to put it in .. albeit we didn’t visit – the standing stone is appropriate though.

I need to find out the name of the pub we visited on Bodmin Moor – remiss of me to forget, and not to ask .. I will!

@ Mel – isn’t it wonderful to see old haunts and remind ourselves of our old stomping grounds. I’ve always loved seafood … and in the old days the Knickerbockerglories!

We’re off to Greenwich … mi’ thought!

@ Alex – yes some of the knickerbockerglories were huge – probably this one is the best …

That’s great we can enjoy crab lasagne sometime together …??!!

@ EC – it amazes me the journey was only 8 nights and six at hotels … but I extrapolated our journey adding in some extra snippets …

I have to say at the end of the trip I was desperate for less food! And I didn’t eat desserts (usually – along the way!) …

@ Suzanne – that Knickerbockerglory is available in Cornwall – I just need to find out the pub’s name – which I will. The memories are amazing … and we had so much fun …

@ Anabel – I’ve enjoyed writing out the series .. and have been surprised how interested and happy everyone has been in reading and commenting on the posts …

Jenny ate every single one of her knickerbocker glories … not sure how many I featured, but she ate a few during our relatively short trip: nearly one a day?!

The main thing is Jenny enjoyed herself … and we had a wonderful trip .. I’m so pleased you’ve all enjoyed my tales – cheers Hilary

Karen Walker said...

What an amazing trip and what a fabulous chronicle of it. Oh my God, that dessert looks scrumptious and Jenny is lovely.

Lowcarb team member said...

What an amazing journey and the way you have shared it, I applaud you.

As always there is some lovely looking food and what a fantastic ending with Jenny and one of her Knickerbockerglory desserts!

All the best Jan

DMS said...

Holy cow- look at that dessert! Wow! That is one treat for sure. :)

I loved this post wrapping up your amazing journey that you let us join you on from afar. I have learned so much and it was fun to read how the route was picked. It sounds like the sleeping arrangements were memorable- and sometimes when we try new places we like them and sometimes we don't. Glad you had a good mix of great places to rest your head each night.

Lovely!
~Jess

Jo said...

I've missed a few of your later posts but glad I got to see the summary. Having lived on a boat for many years, tides were a part of my life, tide tables were our bible. But unless you live near the coast or on a river, tides would be a mystery to most.

Loved your savoury dishes, so nice to get crab anything. Been watching Food Unwrapped and was surprised to find that duck, which is so expensive here, is comparatively cheap in the UK.

That's one hell of a Knickerbocker Glory isn't it? Did she eat many of those?

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

Those posts went by so quickly because they were so interesting. That last picture of Jenny and that massive dessert made my jaw drop.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Karen - it's been fun to write ... and record some of the snippets - and Jenny did enjoy her desserts.

@ Jan - thank you .. it's good to have you here reading and sharing with our trip round. Some of the food was brilliant ... but Knickerbockerglories were always asked for if they were on the menu!

@ Jess - yes Jenny enjoyed her treats. Selecting the hotels was a little daunting from afar ... also the places to visit were unknown, so again it was fun to find out about them. I've learnt a great deal - on a range of subjects ...

@ Jo - you've had some other frustrating things going on - so no wonder you haven't had time to read all the posts. You would know tides after your time on a barge.

I agree - crab anything is wonderful ... I think we've mentioned duck before - but it is delicious and can be a treat at times.

Jenny had a fair number of Knickerbockerglories ... but she enjoyed them a lot!

@ Susan - thanks so much ... I seem to have been writing them for ages ... but I'm glad I completed recording the journey.

I put that picture in .. as it certainly shows a very happy Jenny with her dessert!

Cheers to you all - so glad this wrap-up has met with approval ... Hilary

Diana Wilder said...

What a delicious smorgasbord of images, thoughts and well-put words. Stirring, humorous, smile-making... I will go back and read all the posts in this series, and put my name in for the book... I want the recipe to that last dessert. It looks like a combination of trifle and milkshake! (and your guide looks delightful) Diana

Rhodesia said...

I have thoroughly enjoyed the virtual trip with you. A great summery, but I don't think I could have finished off on the knickerbocker glory!!!! Wow. Hope all is well Diane

Christine Rains said...

Wonderful summary! I loved going on this trip with you. And yes, the menhirs and food did attract me, but all the marvelous little details you gave us were priceless. Thank you. Now I want some ice cream! :)

L. Diane Wolfe said...

What a wonderful adventure you went on with Jenny. You learned so much along the way and we are glad you shared it with us.

beste barki said...

Hilary, you did indeed introduce us to social history, geology, history, people, myths,customs.......and food. Traveling with you was enlightening.

Lisa said...

OMG on that dessert at the end!! What an amazing journey you had. Now I have to go back and read what I missed. Love that about blogs. If you miss something it's still there to go back and read! Thanks for dropping by Hilary!

Lisa said...

Can you add an application to your blog so we can sign up to receive emails every time you post? I know blogspot has that capability...

Bish Denham said...

Thanks for the tour! What a dessert, how can one person possibly finish the whole thing?

H.R. Sinclair, Southpaw said...

The tour was fantastic and this is a nice little bit at the end. But the end, end with that giant dessert! Holy Moly?

Murees Dupé said...

A fantastic journey indeed. I enjoyed reading about each one of your stops. What a lovely dessert. I hope Jenny didn't have a stomach ache afterwards.

Stephen Tremp said...

Hilary, I bet sailors had some of the most passionate prayers as that was a dangerous way to make a living. Better to be at the mercy of God than at the mercy of the elements.

Crystal Collier said...

Other than the sea food aspects of it, I enjoyed every bit of the journey. (I'm convinced I could never live on an island for that one reason.) I especially loved seeing all the old architecture.

Chrys Fey said...

That Knickerbockerglory dessert could feed five! Yum. I want some! ;)

Thanks for the tour!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Diana – many thanks .. so pleased you were drawn in and so much so .. as to go back and read the posts. The Knickerbockerglory varies … mostly icecream, cream and something tasty .. chocolate, caramel etc … what’s available or what you will. You are a star .. re the book, which will come along!

@ Diane – thanks so much – delighted you’ve enjoyed the tour around places in the west country that you used to know quite well. Many wondered about the knickerbockerglory .. and two spoons seemed a good idea … but Jenny always enjoyed hers!

@ Christine – thanks so much … I’m just still amazed that the standing stones attracted so many of you … but I’m delighted to read you enjoyed the extra snippets. Food – I know for you it’d be the desserts …

@ Diane – yes it was such an interesting visit and I’m so happy Jenny asked if I’d drive her around … we had fun …

@ Beste – well I’m glad I got my subjects right … but it’s good to learn, which I love .. and food too!

@ Lisa – yes that particular Knickerbockerglory was large but it was eaten with delight! It was a really good trip – I was lucky to be able to tag along. Blogs are good for that reason aren’t they – always there.

Re the email sign-up – yes I must look at that before the A-Z … I need some help with it. I seem to have a blank on reading the instructions! Sad, but true …

@ Bish – well Jenny did finish her knockerbockerglories – all of them! Thanks for reading …

@ Holly – so glad you enjoyed the tour … and this wrap up; Jenny certainly was kept fed with her desserts!

@ Murees – so happy you enjoyed touring round with us … I think Jenny survived her desserts without suffering too much.

@ Stephen – the Sailor’s Prayer was an appropriate find and to be able to put it up here for many to read …

@ Crystal – some of us love sea food … sorry you don’t … I suspect if you ended up on an island you’d eat sea food quite soon?! I’m glad you enjoyed the buildings I posted about …

@ Chrys – it’d probably could feed five –but I suspect all five would want more! It does look good doesn’t it …

Thanks so much to you all – it’s a pleasure writing these, when you leave me such wonderful comments … cheers Hilary

Lynn said...

I enjoyed your tour so much, Hilary - I'm glad to see this summary this morning. I smiled again at Jenny and her glorious dessert!

Susan Scott said...

A smorgasbord indeed Hilary! That knickerbockerglory desert? I've never seen such a thing!!! It's been such a pleasure being on this journey with you and Jenny, thank you for sharing it with us. Places, poems, prayers, pirates - as you and she traversed these lands that Emily Hobhouse took ...

Jeffrey Scott said...

Great wrap up. What more can be said? :)
What's in the dessert? You know I love desserts.

cleemckenzie said...

Ms. Hobson was a lovely child who became a very handsome lady from her picture. What in interesting life she led and among such beauty.

You made me hungry describing the crab and red peppers, served with a roasted shellfish veloute! Yum. I wouldn't have an inch of room for that gigantic dessert.

Romance Reader said...

Amazing journey and I loved the photo summary!

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

My comments never do justice to your posts, Hilary. And I've discovered how to fix that. I make notes as I'm reading. For instance, the photos are fabulous. The standing stones are fabulous. One of the highlights of my trip was seeing Stonehenge. I was moved by the rocks. I also loved seeing the coast from the air, and wish I'd seen it in person. I like quiet placid landscapes, but they would be out of place in the UK. My father was there during the war, and I'm so happy I was able to see a small part of what he saw.

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

ps. the dessert looks W O N D E R F U L!!!

Julie Flanders said...

Oh my, I want Jenny's dessert!!
I'm sad this journey has come to an end. Thanks for taking us on such a wonderful tour. :)

Shannon Lawrence said...

That is a dessert with a capital D! Thanks for the great tour.

mail4rosey said...

Oh that's your travel mate (and family, yes?) Jennyy!! How exciting!! I know you travel together from your writings here, and I love the story. :)

loverofwords said...

Waiting for your book, Hilary, where all your wonderful posts/stories are together to savor at our leisure.

A Cuban In London said...

I look at that map you included in your post with envy. Brilliant summary. I loved the look of that crab by the way. :-)

Greetings from London.

Cindy Saul said...

I admire your love for learning about history! I really do! I wish it would rub off on me!

Cindy Saul said...

I admire your love for learning about history! I really do! I wish it would rub off on me!

dolorah said...

So much to see, do, take in. I'll bet you could write several more posts about the journey. Awesome trip. Emily was such a heroine.

Have a good weekend Hilary :)

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

Once again, here I am, beyond fashionably late.

I'm a great admirer of your writing, Hilary. Your wrap up post, just like all your posts, is informative, thorough and highly interesting. Jenny and your good self are quite the team.

Speaking of wrap up, wrap up warmly over the weekend, my kind friend.

Gary

Marja said...

OMG that dessert from Jenny is sure a proper one. Wow. The other food looks delicious as well. I love the poem and also the tide. like England we are surrounded by water here on this big island and I love the coast. I would love to explore England one day. Thanks for giving us so much interesting amazing knowledge about the land and the people, the history---and the food :)

M Pax said...

What an amazing trip! Did you meet Mr. Pratt in Plymouth? :) Sorry, that was a Sense and Sensibility reference. I couldn't help myself.

A Cuban In London said...

I just came back because I did not realise that it was St Piran's Day today, so your post is really fitting! :-)

Greetings from London.

Elsie Amata said...

I love that Sailors Prayer. Reminds me of being around Navy folk. I've never heard of Saffron Lasagne, very interesting.

Manzanita said...

So much to see, so much to do, so many marvelous ideas to ponder. Thanks for the travel scenes when I can stay home but yet see it all through your eyes. I'm so happy that I've lived long enough to see all the exciting places through the wonder of electronics.
You are so right about readers loving the tall rocks that are still a mystery. The permanency of rocks is a connection with the earth for most of us.

J.L. Campbell said...

Hilary,
Your posts are always chock full of interesting factoids that makes interesting reading.

Sherry Ellis said...

The saffron lasagna dish sounds good - interesting combination of flavors!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lynn – Thanks so much .. and yes it needed a brief summary .. and this photo of Jenny I just love …

@ Susan – they were really common when I was growing up –as treats! They are still on the menus in various formats – I’ll have to do a write up. I really enjoyed the tour round finding out more about Emily Hobhouse … so gathering snippets and writing up all the interesting historical data … we did traverse Emily’s west country land didn’t we …

@ Jeffrey – thanks so much. The knickerbocker glory seems to have piqued everyone’s interest … I’ll have to do a post …

@ Lee – I’m glad I had photos of Emily to post up … and that photo of Maud with her sister, Emily, is lovely isn’t it … and she did photograph well later in life.

The lasagne was delicious … nor did I often have room for a dessert …

@ Nas – thanks so much .. it’s been fun.

@ Joylene – I just love comments and the additions they make to the post … and it’s wonderful having them from you. Amazing you’re making notes as you read my posts …

Stonehenge is an extraordinary structure ... and these local ones on Dartmoor or in Cornwall just add to the mystery of early communities. The coast has its moments of wonderful calm, with clear colours … but we do have amazing coastal landscapes with crashing waves …

I’m glad you were able to see some parts of the UK where your father served during the War and to relate to his stories.

… and desserts! Yes – the knickerbocker glory became famous during this trip …

@ Julie – Jenny and her desserts … she did love them. Thanks so much … I’m just so delighted everyone enjoyed the tour … it’s reminded me of much of our journey …

@ Shannon – yes the D for desserts deserves that capital. I’m happy you enjoyed the tour around …

@ Rosey – yes .. Jenny is my mother’s cousin … so there’s quite a bit of a wide family link … as you get at cousin level – be they removed or normal .. I’ve enjoyed meeting so many relatives. I’m just grateful I was able to help Jenny by driving her around …

@ Nat – thank you so much re the book … yes I will get to it this year …

@ ACIL – my map is a classic isn’t it … so amateur – but at least it’s possible to see where we went. So pleased the summary matched up –and that crab lasagne was delicious …

part 2 to follow ...

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Cindy – I just started writing the blog and it developed from there … I’ve never enjoyed history before … but now it’s fascinating …

@ Donna – there was a lot to take in and to see … and certainly I could have added in some other posts or snippets – but I tried to restrain myself. I’m just glad I’ve opened the door for more people to read about Emily …

@ Gary – thanks for visiting – it’s good to know you’re here. Thank you so much re your comments … yes Jenny was a wonderful leader of this journey, and I was really pleased I could travel with her and see family and friends …

@ Marja – yes the desserts were pretty amazing and more importantly she enjoyed them! All the food was good. So pleased the poems and letter were good additions … I hope you get over, so you can our tides and coastline: it’s good the posts stimulate you to want to visit …

@ Mary – it was an amazing trip … sadly we didn’t get to Plymouth … dashed past. Interesting about Mr Pratt and Sense and Sensibility .. but no we didn’t ‘meet up’ …

@ ACIL – thanks it was St Piran’s Day … but I was away … and yes I remembered, but couldn’t really fit that in – it’s in my A-Zs last year when I wrote about Cornwall … under P for St Piran and Pixies …

@ Elsie – I wanted to post the Sailor’s Prayer … such a good one – and I’m sure you thought about your Navy connections. Saffron I relate more to Cornwall … but this was a delicious dish.

@ Manzanita – yes there was lots to do, to see and to ponder .. and I could have added lots more stories. The advantage of writing blog posts, which allow friends around the world see into our journeys is a wonderful new technological development. Yet – the permanence of rocks are not permanent … for us yes, … but for aeons they’ve have changed over time and will continue to do so …

@ Joy – thanks so much .. appreciate your thoughts and this comment …

@ Sherry – the saffron lasagne was very delicious … and the flavours worked so well …

Thanks everyone for your lovely comments and appreciation of our journey – and I know Jenny will be happy that so many of you have enjoyed our ‘Emily Hobhouse story’ … cheers Hilary

Dianne K. Salerni said...

What an amazing trip this was! So many learning opportunities, so many beautiful places, personal history, friends & family, and of course, amazing food!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Dianne - it was a wonderful trip ... I did enjoy all parts of it ... loved the family aspects, the personal history as you mention, and then the history of each place ... and the food - oh yes! Cheers Hilary