Saturday, 3 September 2016

Bran Tub # 3: Wayzgoose, Printers, Hay and Meadows ...



Once I’d come across the word “Wayzgoose” – I felt it ‘necessary’ to write about it … this, if you can believe it, is an annual dinner, picnic or ‘BEANFEAST’ given to those employed in a printing house!  That is Brewer’s definition … and continues …

in Grimsby, Ontario

Wayz is an obsolete word for a bundle of hay, straw, stubble; hence a “STUBBLE GOOSE”, a harvest goose or fat goose, which is the crowning dish of the entertainment.


Jan Steen: The Bean Feast - 1668




I knowz no more!!








Scything, making a windrow,
before the hay is gathered up



But it is hay time … and they are out scything – using the old method … hand scything … this is in celebration of Lammastide, which marks the beginning of the grain harvest (it was the end of July) … but I could not pass up Wayzgoose!







Traditional Wooden
Scythe




I’ve posted the link at the end to Spitalfields Life “Haymaking on Walthamstow Marshes” … it’s a Site of Special Scientific Interest, and was originally drained for agriculture in ancient times.


Conjectural map of a Medieval
Manor c/o Wikipedia




The post links to William Morris and what we term Common Land … for that extra history lesson!






We are being treated to a fair number of articles on our meadows … and how we must protect them.





Coronation Meadows china - by Burleigh
In 2013 – the Prince of Wales set up a project for sixty “Coronation Meadows” commemorating the 60th anniversary of the Queen’s Coronation.  Again – more can be read in the link at the end of the post …




Meadow plants in situ


Variety is the spice of life for us … for meadows too – insect population increases: nourished by lots of nectar rich flowers, extra seeds produced – which can be garnered and spread around … then these plant varieties offer us salves, oils, vinegars … a meadow is nature’s healing …




Scythed hay with windrows

Meadows thrive on poor soil and now the seeds have set – the pastures need cutting – while we need to ensure that the cut grass is raked off … creating a windrow … which can be seen in the Spitalfields Life post … also, an essential, the cut grass should be removed, so the soil is not enriched.





Achillea: Sneezewort

The variety of names for these ancient plants are like a gateway to how the plants could be used in other ways ... ancient remedies and healing properties … eg: Sneezewort, or how about Granny’s Toenails





1778 Notice ... re the annual Bean Feast and its
cancellation ...
 in the village of Litcham in Norfolk
Before the Wayzgeese get out of hand and demand more ‘beanz’ … I’ll wrap this up – and send us on our way to Ontario perhaps to the Grimsby Annual Bookarts Fair in April … or just let our imaginations wander as to a feast of our making … or what plants we might find as we look for our picnic spot …





Here’s to Wayzgoose … last weekend was a bank holiday and party time for British families, while this weekend is Labour Day in the States … so enjoy your goose …


Spitalfields Life - Haymaking on Walthamstow Marshes  

Coronation Meadows - BBC Nature News


We have been having the most incredible weather recently - particularly here in the south-east ... very much Wayzgoose picnic times!

Have good Labor Day weekends ... the rest of us will get on with life!  Our Bank Holiday was last weekend ... I have written about them.

Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

67 comments:

A Heron's View said...

Let us not get caught up by wrong terminology and describing straw as hay. For the stalks of the grain bearing grasses are tubular in structure known as straw and is harvested July to no later than early September.
Hay is made from grass leaves generally cut in early June and sometimes a second or even a third cut is made. The one important difference is between Hay and Straw is that the grass for hay is cut before it makes seed.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Ooh dear ... I guess I wobbled here - but you've clarified it for us ...

Thanks Mel - I expect I was trying not to use the same word too often - but Wayzgoose was 'my' word ... I did quote Brewers - sadly I muddled the timing of hay gathering, re straw garnering ...

Well the 'story' still stands - though, I agree I really should know more about country life ... and perhaps should involve myself in a year of farm life to get a better grip of things.

Thanks so much for alerting me and other readers to the mix up .. cheers Hilary

A Heron's View said...

Ah, Hilary you are not the only one who gets the two mixed up, that I do know.
Incidentally: straw is used for bedding the cattle on and also today is manufactured into fuel as well as boarding. There are a number of interesting folk traditions concerning the harvest. One here in Ireland was to leave a corner of the field uncut it was known as the Hare's Corner.

Elephant's Child said...

The Coronation Meadows is a wonderful idea.
Spitalfields Life frequently showcases lost (or nearly lost) skills and is often a delight.
While strength may not be involved I suspect that many of the amateur scythers knew they had been working the next day.
Another quirky and fascinating post - thank you.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks ... me too - just glad to know it's not only me.

The 'Hare's Corner' is interesting .. I've a snippet to use with a Hare Statue ... but on looking - could you clarify please! Was it for the hare?

Cheers Hilary

A Heron's View said...

Yes indeed Hilary the Hares Corner was left as a refuge for the Hare.
ref: http://theeverlivingones.blogspot.ie/2014/09/travelling-to-otherworld.html

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi EC - I'm glad you know Spitalfields Life - amazing blog. The Coronation Meadows were/are a brilliant idea.

I suspect those amateur scythers knew within a few minutes they'd be feeling very achy later on, and definitely the next day. It's learning the knack ... and that is always difficult at first ... I'd fail and flail!

@ Mel - thanks for enlightening me ... I thought it might be linked to Colm's music - but hadn't got to look further ... so the link really helps.

Great to see you both here - and thanks for all the thoughts - cheers Hilary

jabblog said...

'Wayzgoose' - I shall have to find a way to include that in a conversation! I love archaic language . . .

Out on the prairie said...

A hand scythe is a tough tool to use. I have one and it is sure to give one blisters.Today is a hay auction, I will ask if anyone has heard of this.

Mike@Bit About Britain said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mike@Bit About Britain said...

Fascinating! You certainly come up with some interesting stuff. Coincidentally, I was talking to chap just yesterday who supplies scythes - including to well-known TV productions. Me, I'm happier going into battle armed with my trusty Honda petrol strimmer; but you certainly have to rake up the debris. Alas, Hilary, I can advise you from first-hand experience that the recent good weather enjoyed in the south east has not been universal! But a trip to the east looms next week - fingers crossed...

Suzanne Furness said...

Wayzgoose . . . now that is a word I have never come across before. Always interesting to learn how words and language evolved. Thanks, Hilary.

Truedessa said...

Wayzgoose - I like that word, how can I use that today to my amusement. I do enjoy a meadow of flowers and yes, many have healing properties.

Have a lovely weekend! I will def enjoy the extra day off here.

Botanist said...

It's Labor Day weekend here in Canada, too. Last weekend before school starts, and right on cue the Autumn weather has kicked in all of a sudden. This is the weekend of the local agricultural fair, and we're on our way out there shortly. Lots of traditional crafts on display.

Kathleen Valentine said...

Wayzgoose is a wonderful word! I love peculiar words like that. I have long been an advocate for turning lawns into meadows. This summer for the first time in 20 years no one has mowed the cemetery out back and I love it this way--like a beautiful meadow growing ancient headstones.

Rhodesia said...

You are very good at coming up with interesting blogs and this time a word that has never crossed my lips. Well done. Have a good weekend Dane

Inger said...

There are few places on this earth as lovely as a meadow. We have them in Sweden too, but here they may appear in the spring and then dry out completely, so not true meadows. I'm so glad you are protecting them and the meadow teapot is lovely too.

D.G. Hudson said...

An interesting post, Hilary, and a new word. I know next to nothing about farming but I love to hear about old folk traditions. How neat to leave a corner in the field for the hares (in Ireland). But I wonder, did they then capture the hares to have for dinner?

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Wayzgoose. I did indeed learn something today.

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

I think you will understand my absence. Thankfully, I can now attempt to focusing on commenting.

You knowz more than I do. Always an insightful post by your good self. I reckon you could make the most quotidian of subjects seem exciting. But, "hay", what do I know.

It's "Labor" Day in the States on Monday. And in Canada, it's Labour Day on Monday.

Enjoy the rest of our two day weekend. Thank you for your supportive comments on my blog, my kind friend.

Cheers,

Gary

Rhonda Albom said...

'Wayzgoose' is a word I hadn't heard before, and one which I never would have given this much thought, but now that I have, I am fascinated.

T. Powell Coltrin said...

This is a great post. LOVE the word Wayzgoose. I may have to use it in my real life. Oh and many mix up straw and hay meanings. Big deal.

T

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Janice – it was such a fun word to spot … and then write about …

@ Steve – I bet a hand scythe is tough to use … I’m sure we had one years ago. I wonder if Wayzgoose has been heard in your neck of the Prairies … perhaps you’ll tell us …

@ Mike – well I try and make my posts different. I’m glad scythes are still being made and that craft of making them and of use hasn’t died out. Strimmers certainly have advantages – but I do not like seeing them used – slash and slash!

Sorry about the weather – I realise being down here … we’re mostly lucky with the weather – enjoy your easterly trip, which looks like the better weather will accompany it …

@ Suzanne – words amuse me … but I’m so glad Wayzgoose is being enjoyed by everyone here …

@ Truedessa – perhaps some poetry can come from it … and plants have some extraordinary properties. You enjoy your day off tomorrow …

@ Ian – I hadn’t really realised Canada has Labor Day too – I hope the agricultural fair was fun and not too ‘rained’ on … fascinating to see the traditional crafts on display …

@ Kathleen – I couldn’t resist posting about it. More is being done here for wildlife, yet sadly more is not being done – people don’t seem to realise the necessity for good husbandry. So glad you’re cemetery is being left to grow and the ancient headstones can rest amongst the grasses …

@ Diane – I spot something interesting and just want to write about it – this is just one of those! Thanks though.

@ Inger – yes the meadows in the valleys and on the low slopes of the mountains of Europe and Scandinavia always look wonderful … we get to see the tv programmes on them. As you say – areas will be colonised with plant life if it is allowed … and even with drying out – it’s amazing what comes back.

Isn’t the teapot lovely … that design is quite special ...

@ DG – good to see you … I too know ‘just about nothing’ of farm life … but like to see craft traditions kept up. I expect the hare corner was just for letting the hares have somewhere to hide - good husbandry back then … so I’m sure a couple were used for dinner … but the rest would have free rein – now I suspect some thieving would happen sadly.

@ Alex – well that’s good news!

@ Gary – I do completely understand why you haven’t been around, which I’m glad has been sorted. I do enjoy writing about odd subjects – but need that hook … to hang my posts from. “hay” or “hey” … is too commonly used in the wrong way! Now I hope all goes really well for you …

@ Rhonda – I just looked up the meaning … it’s such an odd word – so a post was formed! Glad you enjoyed it …

@ Teresa – isn’t it fun … and I hope you can get to use it in conversation somewhere along the line … Hay and Stray – I’m just glad I’m not the only one muddling things up … I must remember the difference now:

Hay from grass in early part of June … dried, baled and stacked … and is used for cattle feed

Silage is where grass, moist, is turned into food value – it is baled and covered in plastic, or taken back to the farm yard and then covered. Food for cattle.

Straw is a by-product of grain producing grasses (wheat, barley, rye and oats. Round bales or square blocks are made – then taken to factories and made into other products … some is still used for over-wintering the animals in their barns/stalls.

Cheers to you all – this has helped me understand the difference between Hay and Straw … enjoy the Labor Day Weekend … and everyone else look forward to a happy September week! Hilary

diedre Knight said...

A potpourri of delightful information! We're at our mountain retreat just now and there are gorgeous yellow meadows in every space without a tree. Hubs got the weed-eater out soon after we arrived on Thursday but I asked him to leave a couple of patches of those tiny blue flowers to gaze (and sneeze) at :-)

Denise Covey said...

Hillary, I love your style! When I get caught by a new word, I like to play with it. Wayzgoose. Cool word. Who would have thought it had anything to do with haymaking? Thanks for the drum! Sounds like you're in the grip of good weather if they're out in the fields with a scythe. In Morocco, this is still the way it is always done. :-)

TexWisGirl said...

what a fun word. :)

Liz A. said...

I love bizarre words like that. They're more fun if I can work them into my remarks to a class. I love the looks they give me when I use a word that they don't know and are sure I've made up.

Juliet Batten said...

I love these new and odd words. Trust you to ferret them out Hilary! The wild flowers are good to see too.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Diedre - so glad you enjoyed it ... and can relate it to your mountain retreat ... sounds wonderful. I have to admit I love fields of blue ... we have flax fields here ... they are so comforting to see ... thankfully I don't sneeze ...

@ Denise - I was surprised to learn what Wayzgoose meant ... certainly not a picnic for printers in the meadows of our harvest time. So I guess the haymaking came from the stubble goose.

What was meant to be a brief spell of unsettled weather ... has left us with a lot of moist air ... not cold, but not dry! It is expected to return ... let's hope.

I'm sure the non-first world countries still use the scythe and their traditional ways ... Morocco falls into that category ...

@ Teresa - excellent!

@ Liz - it is certainly a bizarre word ... I do hope you have fun with the kids in class ... it'll provide much amusement - or should do and lots of creative ideas for an essay?!

@ Juliet - thanks ... I do too - and if I see one - they're out into the blog for some fun reading ... Wild flowers are wonderful aren't they ...

Thanks so much ... as I said to Denise - I'm now waiting for the warm air to blow our thick sea mist away! Cheers Hilary

Robert Bennett said...

One of those facts that you learn and just go "...huh."

This was followed by me playing with the prefix and finding the Wayzgoose sounded the best and the Wayzturkey just seemed strange.

Bish Denham said...

Oh my, I suppose I could say, only the English could come up with a Wayzgoose! Sounds absolutely delightful. I picture an all day picnic in a field of flowers with the participants sharing books they're reading.

Chrys Fey said...

Wayzgoose is a fun word. I like the sound of it. :) Odd words make me happy. I've shared quite a few myself, but these were great.

Dianne K. Salerni said...

Wayzgoose and Beanfest. What delightful traditions!

cleemckenzie said...

I will be saying Wayzgoose all day. And I may even break out the bean recipe for dinner. The woman in the Jan Steen painting makes me want to gorge myself on beans.

I guess those Coronation Meadows are open land without possibility of development? Wonderful. I love looking out over a meadow.

Thanks Hilary!

Summer said...

Quite interesting... Nice to learn about this new word ♥

summerdaisycottage.blogspot.com

Sai Charan said...

Thank you Hilary for another interesting post!! :) Informative as usual :) Every time I visit your blog, I always get the happy feeling cause I learn a lot of new things :) English countryside is very beautiful and learning more about it is exciting :)

Thank you,
Sai :)

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

That is a cool name and I'll take any excuse for a holiday. My dad owned an old wooden handle sickle (as he called it) and used it to clear out weedy areas.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Robert – exactly what I thought … so had to look further and see what it was all about. Wayzturkey, or Wayzduck ... isn’t quite the same is it … fun thoughts though …

@ Bish – I’ve no idea where the word came from … and certainly if the derivation was easy – I’d probably have put it in – which it isn’t … so I didn’t! What a wonderful idea … and picture you’ve painted for us … a harvest picnic with readings …

@ Chrys – I agree, I love hearing and learning new words – then the stories behind them ..

@ Lee – it’s a fun word isn’t it … while a bean recipe sounds good. The woman is very replete isn’t she … full to the gunwales.

I note I didn’t write about the Coronation Meadows – perhaps now is a good time to do a post … coming up. The countryside at the moment is glorious as too – walking through the meadows …

@ Summer – thank you …

@ Sai – pleasure ... it’s lovely having comments when people have enjoyed the post. That’s great – thank you … I’m just glad you feel you’re learning and are happy to be here. England is stunning at the moment …

@ Susan - oh yes I'd have a holiday in the summer countryside any time too.

You've highlighted something I didn't mention ... the sickle -

Sickle v Scythe:

Sickle = is used with one hand, short handle, blade - sharp on the inside curve. Used for cutting grains or hay

Scythe - as shown in post = Two-handled tool used standing up instead of stooped over; longer blade and longer handle. Evolved after the sickle - when a longer reach was required.

Cheers to you all – thanks so much - Hilary

Gattina said...

What a strange word ! When I hear meadows and hay, it makes me think of autumn, and that's a season I don't like at all !

Lynn said...

Love that word! And isn't it nice that the Prince of Wales started that project? I love wildflowers.

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

Wayzgoose... that's interesting. Makes me think of wagzoogle, something I loved to say when I was a kid. I knowz not why. Did I mention we used to help my dad bring in the hay? Fun times. Thanks for bringing back memories, Hilary.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Gattina - it's fun isn't it ... I love the meadows and hay ... but we live in a seasonal world ... so Autumn will come around.

@ Lynn - Wayzgoose - couldn't miss not blogging it. Yes - the Prince loves his natural spaces and looks to protect wildlife ...

@ Joylene - that's a great word ... I think I'd have kept using it - to see if I could get it into the outer world ... Wagzoogle .. fun!

So glad this brought back memories of your time with your father bringing in the hay ...

Thanks to you three ... lovely to see you - cheers Hilary

Liza said...

I'm not sure where I learned more...in your post, or in all the comments! Love the word, and the idea of coronation meadows is a delightful.

Mason Canyon said...

Hilary, I always learn so much from your post. Now Wayzgoose will running through my mind all day. :)

Thoughts in Progress
and MC Book Tours

Christine Rains said...

Here's to Wayzgoose! Love those names for plants. My brother and his family live in Grimsby, Ontario. Such a wonderful town. I went to university nearby in St. Catherines.

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Wayzgoose is an awesome word! Some words just grab your imagination by the coattails, or sound too good rolling off your tongue to be contented with saying it only once, and that word is definitely one of them.

But, if you please, I'd much rather have Wayzcrabs. :)

Michael Di Gesu said...

HI, Hilary,

Never new that meadows grew on poor soil. Interesting. Especially since the grass needs to be cleared away.

Always learn something new with your posts! Thanks!

Crystal Collier said...

For me that would be headache/runny nose season. There's a year round affect of that in Florida too, but fall was always the killer when it came to allergies. At least now they're consistent. ;)

N. R. Williams said...

Hi Hilary
Another historically interesting post. May I make a suggestion as a totally uninformed American. I don't understand as much as I should about titles. Why is Charles the Prince of Wales and William is not? What is the difference between an Earl and Duke? What's the order of importance of titles? What is a steward? In my books the steward investigates things and handles disturbances for the king. I hope I'm not way off, but of course it's fantasy and I invented another title of 'Friend-Brother.'

If you decide to do this let me know. I'd love to read what you have to say.
Nancy

Gail M Baugniet - Author said...

Just popping over from Karen Walker's site today during #IWSG day. I always enjoy learning new words, Hilary, and Wayzgoose is the most fun word I've learned this year. All your photographs are so colorful.

Lisa said...

Wayzgoose! What a word and so sad they ended it. I love meadows and their place in the life cycle. Love this post, as usual. Sorry I haven't visited in awhile, but I hope to be more regular now as life seems to have settled down a little!

Elsie Amata said...

Wayzgoose? I never heard of the word before today and I wonder if I'll ever hear it again. But if I do, you know I'll think of you :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Liza – yes it’s great when everyone gets involved and we all learn something new or add to the post – I’m delighted. I’ll be doing something on Coronation Meadows … not sure how soon – but they’ll pop up …

@ Mason – thanks so much … it’s such a fun word … I don’t think I’ll forget it …

@ Christine – yes the Sneezewort and Granny’s Toenails are wonderful descriptive names for wild flowers. How extraordinary your brother and his family live in Grimsby – have they heard of the book shop? Lucky you … St Catherines looks to be a wonderful seat of learning and city …

@ Susan – tickles your fancy doesn’t it – totally bemuses me ... but I rather like Wayzcrabs … I’d have both though! It’s not a word to be said once – no-one ever hears first time! Still wayzcrabs is better than Robert’s wayzturkey!

@ Michael – yes it’s interesting about meadows and poor soil – meadows you can’t cultivate … they just need to be their natural selves. I’ll be writing about them in a little more detail sometime soonish … glad you enjoyed the visit ..

@ Crystal – oh sorry … I’m so lucky I don’t suffer from allergies – I feel for those who do struggle with them …

@ Nancy – I will endeavour to do something light and easy to understand re Dukes and Earls …

Prince Charles – is easy: the heir to the throne is always the Prince of Wales … William is not heir to the throne … he is 2nd in line and gets the title of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge … that all swaps around once the monarchy changes …

It won’t be an easy reply … it be complicated!! If it’s fantasy … don’t worry too much …

@ Gail – great to see you from Karen’s IWSG post – I’m working on my input.

Great you enjoyed Wayzgoose … and I like to add photos in to the posts – brings things to life …

@ Lisa – I’m not sure they’ve ended it – well that particular one, but it was 1778 … this is the kind of tradition that gets taken up again. But I just loved the word and wanted to bring it out into the open.

Meadows will come to the fore fairly soon. No worries re the visiting – you’ve had lots going on …

@ Elsie – that’s great you’ll remember where you heard Wayzgoose first …

Thanks so much everyone … looks like we gave Liza some more information via the comments – take care and cheers Hilary

M Pax said...

Love the word Wayzgoose. It's just wonderful. They mostly grow alfalfa out this way. Even in the dry, high desert they get 2 cuttings a year. The valley can get 3 or more.

Lynda R Young said...

I've learned a new word! And I've learned more about meadows and haymaking :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Mary - it's fun isn't it .. It's wonderful they can get two cuttings or three in valley from the alfalfa fields .. I bet there are meadows in the desert though ...

@ Lynda - thank you ... and I'm glad I brought meadows and haymaking to life ..


Re Christine Rains and her brother who lives in Grimsby, Ontario .. says:

"My sister-in-law says she has heard of it. They love living in Grimsby. Each year when we visit family in Canada, we stay with them in Grimsby for a couple of days. This year when we walked to the lake, we passed one of these lovely mini libraries. There are some charming places tucked away in southern Ontario."

It's good to know a little more about the Grimsby area too ...

Cheers to you all - Hilary

Nick Wilford said...

I love the word Wayzgoose. I have heard it before - I believe Terry Pratchett named a wizard Wayzygoose in one of the early Discworld books, no doubt he picked it up from Brewer's Dictionary as well as that was one of his major inspirations. Didn't know it meant beanfeast - sounds like fun to attend!

Julie Flanders said...

Now I want to use the word Wayzgoose. How funny! I wish it would come back into fashion. :)

Enjoy the upcoming weekend, Hilary.

beste barki said...

Talking about meadows is my kind of conversation, Hilary. This was a fun and educational post, as always.

Sherry Ellis said...

Wayzgoose is a word I had never heard of. I wonder if they have wayzducks and wayzpigeons. ;)

L. Diane Wolfe said...

I hope you enjoyed your holiday.

I'd be sneaking in trying to free the Wayzgoose.

Murees Dupé said...

Granny's Toenails? That's sounds like a scary one:) I hope you are doing well, Hilary. Once again thank you so much for your comment and support on my blog. I am very grateful.

DMS said...

What a fun work- Wayzgoose. I have never encountered it before. Glad you are having such wonderful weather! :)
~Jess

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nick – fascinating … on googling nothing came up to clear Wayzgoose’s air! So I was none the wiser … but perhaps Terry Pratchett did use it … and good to know he used Webster’s. Yes – especially with the weather we’ve been having down here … a beanfeast picnic would be great fun …

@Julie – I think we can make it come back into fashion! It’s a fun word to ‘throw’ around … and someone asked me if I could let them have a copy of this write up!

@ Beste – meadows are just lovely aren’t they … I was listening to the radio on a programme on Seamus Heaney … where his poems gave us a flavour of an earlier life (not so long ago though) …

@ Sherry – I think pronouncing Wayzgoose is bad enough … but to add ducks and pigeons … would be a little much?!

@ Diane – that holiday time was lovely … and I know you’d be trying to release the goose.

@ Murees – I know ... fun names things get called! I’m glad to see you Murees …

@ Jess – it is a fun word … I don’t think I’ll forget it now … today the good weather has returned!

Thanks so much – lovely to see you all … cheers - Hilary

Ann Best said...

Obsolete words are so interesting. And variety is indeed "the spice of life" ... which you do so marvelously. I love "strolling" through the photographs that take me out of my small duplex world into our wonderful diverse earth-world. :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Ann - thanks so much ... I'm just glad you enjoy your stroll around my posts - via the photos and those 'obsolete words' ... which can enlighten us to old crafts etc ...

Cheers Hilary

Kali Delamagente said...

That was fun. Love words, Hilary.BTW--this is Jacqui. I'm in a different account!