Friday, 30 September 2016

Trains: Films with Railway Connections, Exbury Gardens and Britain’s Great Little Railways …



Our Under Ground Theatre puts on a season of 4 films with railway connections presented by a railway enthusiast … we are lucky in Eastbourne … 

The Underground's poster for these films



... the town is relatively small yet large enough to accommodate people with lots of interesting ideas.  We have other theatres, cinemas and event arenas … The Under Ground puts on a variety of smaller and select events …






We were also probably the first ‘seaside town’ … in June 1780, the children of George III (1738 – 1820) spent their summer holiday at the Round House, near where the pier is today … the sea encroached and ‘pinched it back’!  One of those children would become father to Queen Victoria.  I’ll publish a post fairly soon on Eastbourne’s beginnings …


Brief Encounter (1946) B/W 86 minutes:



David Lean’s magnificent film version of a short story by Noel Coward, starring Celia Johnson and Trevor Howard … being filmed just north of Lancaster in north-west England.


Mike at a Bit About Britain – wrote a post on Carnforth Station – the locals and public insisted the iconic stop be refurbished: now a wonderful Heritage Centre for the film.  See links to his ‘Brief Encounter’ post, and to the main Heritage Centre’s site …




I had never seen the whole film … but was delighted to enjoy a 30 minute portion of the film - the romantic weepie bit made in 1945 … when necessity was the mother of invention … and when filming  no-one yet had invented the term ‘health and safety’ … somewhat superfluous just after the War.




The Titfield Thunderbolt (1952) Colour 84 minutes:


Why didn’t or haven’t they changed the name of this film … like Titty in Swallows and Amazons?!



London and Manchester Railway 57
Lion    (LMR 57 Lion)  in 1980
A wonderful very British Ealing Comedy Film about the community of Titfield trying to save their railway by running it themselves, but the rival bus company sets out to sabotage the venture.


Filmed near Bath, but was inspired after the restoration of the narrow gauge Talylyn Railway in Wales – the world’s first heritage railway run by volunteers.


The train featured in the film is ‘LMR 57 Lion’, an engine built in 1838 – the year of Queen Victoria’s Coronation.




Oh Mr Porter! (1937) 85 minutes B/W: 

This pre-War film stars Will Hay and is regarded as one of his best and funniest films.  It was mainly set in Ireland (but filmed here in Hampshire).




William Porter, an inept railway worker, who due to family connections – is given the job of stationmaster at a remote and ramshackle rural Northern Irish railway station in the (fictitious) town of Buggleskelly, situated on the border with the then Irish Free State.




He is inept … yet manages to discover all sorts of strange railway practices and a gang of gun-runners – beats them all … much to the staggered amazement of the powers that be and his family.


The Great St Trinian’s Train Robbery (1966) Colour 93 minutes.


Ronald Searle drew the first St Trinian cartoons … but in 1941 had to fulfil his military career.  I hadn’t realised Searle started off his satirical school drawings to ‘amuse’ two daughters of some friends he visited … he also couldn’t understand their desire to return to a boarding school!


The film was made after the actual Great Train Robbery of 1963 and parodied the technocratic ideas of the Harold Wilson government and its support of the comprehensive school system.  This is the fourth film in a series of five St Trinian’s films.



It is a hair-raising fast-moving series of events … totally off- the planet in comedic terms … just so much hilarity – one is ‘bursting one’s seams’ with joy …


The book issued with some
of Searle's St Trinian's illustrations
There are three trains involved – with all the farce that could be mustered when three trains starred in a film – the line used was the Longmoor Military Railway … which was a British Military Railway in Hampshire, built by the Royal Engineers in 1903 in order to train soldiers on railway construction and operations.


When they were filming these farcical scenes – there were the odd ‘disasters’ … including one when an engine derailed – the actors, film crew etc had ‘heart attacks’ – the Army, who had been fully co-operating, said ‘no worries’ … just lifted the engine back into place – common practise in the theatre of war.






Change of size now … to Little Railways … Sherry Ellis from GoneGarden.blogspot … writes about gardens and up pops Exbury Gardens with its miniature railway … with connections to the Rothschilds who have and had much influence on British culture … their bequests to the British Museum, the Natural History Museum at Tring, now part of the main London NHM, other estates and gardens … 




"Naomi" with three carriages
at Exbury Gardens central


TheExbury Steam Railway (at the gardens) that goes on a journey across the pond in Summer Lane Garden, along the top of the rock gardens and into the American Garden.  It was built in 2000 – 2001 as an additional attraction to the gardens. 




The narrow gauge tender tank locos were built specially by the Exmoor Steam Railway in Somerset.  Both are members of Britain’s Great Little Railways organisation.

It does look as though it has been
set up beautifully ... I really wouldn't mind
being the train driver here!



Four films … links to railways, renovated stations, interesting challenging links – the Great Train Robbery in 1963, when over pounds 2.6 million (equivalent to about pounds 49 million today) was stolen from the train.





Britain's Great Little Railways … sound fun to know about and at some stage travel on … while Exbury Gardens looks to be beautiful with a fascinating history …


Exbury Gardens

Perhaps you’ll be inspired to check out one or two or more of the films, visit Exbury or one of Britain's Great Little Railways … miniature versions ... and  I hope have time to visit Sherryover at her blog ... 


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

63 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

There is a romance to train travel (particularly steam) which is absent from anything else I can think of. Except sailing ships.
And yes Exbury Gardens look lovely. Thank you so much. Off to visit Sherry now.

Suzanne Furness said...

Travelling by train is something special isn't it? I have never seen any of the films you mention, I will look out for them. Good to hear you have a lot going in your area. Thanks for the little excursion whilst I eat my breakfast. Hope your weekend is a good one, Hilary.

Mason Canyon said...

I enjoy watching old films such as these. Makes me think of a peaceful afternoon enjoying the countryside from the view of an old train. The Gardens look lovely. Off to visit Sherry. Have a lovely weekend, Hilary.

Thoughts in Progress
and MC Book Tours

Bish Denham said...

My husband adores trains! I'll have to see if I can get any of these films to surprise him with a bit of British humor err, humour. :)

L. Diane Wolfe said...

A train ride through a garden would be relaxing.

There's an American film from the 70's called The Great Train Robbery. I wonder if the two are connected?

Jo said...

I saw a St. Trinian's movie years ago, don't know which one. I have, of course, done a lot of train travel. Used to go by train from the Medway Towns to Herne Bay to school. I then used to travel by train from the Medway Towns to London to work. Not too many trains over here though. Of course I remember the great train robbery. Pretty shocking at the time. Ronald Biggs was involved I recall. Don't remember the movies though. Sound interesting. There is a miniature railway in Blowing Rock North, Carolina although we never managed to get a ride on it.

Mike Goad said...

Trains are always interesting. I can actually remember all of the train lines I've been on. Nebraska, Illinois, Scotland, Colorado, Alaska. And, of course, train scenes appear in a lot of movies.

One classic silent film, The General, starring Buster Keaton, is available on YouTube. It's based on a true story where a band of Union soldiers attempt to steal a rebel train in Georgia, planning to destroy tracks and bridges as they steamed north. https://youtu.be/ilPk-SCHv30

Another movie was made in 1956 about the raid, The Great Locomotive Chase, starring Fess Parker. A preview of it is available on YouTube: https://youtu.be/YnZlJbofjfc

More about the actual history http://militaryhistory.about.com/od/CivilWarEast1862/p/American-Civil-War-Great-Locomotive-Chase.htm

Out on the prairie said...

I wasn't familiar with any, but would enjoy watching all.They do monthly movies outdoors at three venues near me. I sat through the new Star Wars and had a better time looking over those who attended in costume.we used to travel on the rails as a kids more, but here they have decreased the service. Terrible to do. I used the trains every time I have been overseas exclusively.Sad we prefer driving so much.My parents used to send us to my grandparents every summer riding the train by ourselves(five children). Most would be hesitant when I have told that tale.

H.R. Sinclair, Southpaw said...

Trains are so fascinating. Where I grew up there was an "old train yard." It was open to the public and safe. I remember climbing up in to the engine and walking through the cars. They still had that quaint, mysterious feeling.

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

All of those films sound good to me, but I've gotta ask. Is the name Titfield based on an actual community? Otherwise, I'm surprised political correctness hasn't caused the movie industry to change the name within the movie.

We had a friend, now deceased, who was a very talented metal worker and fabricator, and he built steam engines from scratch... perfect to-scale replicas, which he could sit on and ride. He did amazing work.

Janie Junebug said...

I haven't seen any of these movies. I noticed Netflix Streaming has a two-part documentary about the Great Train Robbery. I have it in my list, and I've heard some stories about it.

Love,
Janie

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC – there is romance to train travel – or certainly used to be – then the wonderful Overland Expresses … Orient (continental Europe), Blue Train in SA, and the Rockie Mountaineer (Canada) … there must be others, and some in Aus … thanks for visiting Sherry …

They are reviving (by rebuilding) a new steam train here in the UK – I’d better find out more details … using old designs.

@ Suzanne – I used to do the Penzance to London and vice versa train on occasions over a few years. Pleasure and am glad the train trips have entertained you over your breakfast!

@ Mason – they are fun films … many of those small country train lines have disappeared … but I remember one from Cornwall days. Thanks for visiting Sherry …

@ Bish – yes … humour here! Oh that’s great to hear you’ll try and see if you can find those films for him … they are ridiculously funny …

@ Diane – I must say that train trip around Exbury does look such a great ride through wonderful gardens … I must go down, perhaps next year.

That 70s film is also about another gold heist in England based on Michael Crichton’s book … the robbery occurred in 1855 when they wanted to steal the gold, which was destined for the Crimean War Front … the film is set in London … so a different film (1979), different time – but about a true event.

@ Jo – there are a few St Trinian’s films but they’re such fun. I still use the train (when it works … as they’ve been on strike rather more often than not … so I’m off London visits!). For some reason I don’t remember much about the train robbery – though it was always and still is sometimes in the paper – Biggs ended up in Brazil ….

@ Mike – trains to some are always interesting!! Train scenes certainly occur in lots of stories and films …

I used to love Buster Keaton films … and I’m sure I’ve seen ‘The General’ … thanks for the link …

Then your 1956 “The Great Locomotive Chase” … fun to know about – thanks and for the link once again. … and then the history!!

Your love of trains and knowledge shine through …

@ Steve – that’s great … when you have a chance to see the films. I can quite believe you crowd watched … with their costumes when Star Wars was on: I have yet to see it!

Our trains/ lines were chopped after the War – and I think now everyone is really regretting it … as more of us use cars, trucks to deliver stuff … Trains are fine – if you’re going from A to B ... but not if you want to get to other places along the way. Our buses in towns are ok – but in the country … travel is a challenge.

Travel today is different isn’t it … we were on occasion sent to Cornwall (from outside London) by train … if I got rattled, I’d take my brothers into first class … and from my hem take out some extra money and pay the fare!! I was 14 or 15 I guess!!

@ Holly – that’s a great memory to have – and is something I’ve never done … though I’ve been on an old Preserved Steam Train – the Bluebell line here in Sussex … You must have enjoyed your ‘play time’ on those trains in the yard, the engine and the cars … fun to read about.

@ Susan – Titfield was based on another village – where the name came from I’ve no idea … the film was made in 1953 – so that’s it … regardless of political correctness – this name will stay the test of time. Swallows and Amazons was recent …

Your comment about your friend and how he built steam engines from scratch … has inspired me to write up on our new steam train being built now – based on old designs …

@ Janie – it could be either of the two Great Train Robberies (or even others) that I’ve mentioned above to Diane … but enjoy when it comes around …

Gosh that surprised me – how much you enjoyed the post and how you related your own tales … that’s great – lovely comments and interest ... thank you – cheers Hilary

Joanne said...

I love trains, films, and gardens so this post is chugging along with tons of goodies. No derailment! I am of fan of Sherry's blog so glad you gave her a shout out. I would love to ride the rails in the UK. Maybe some day. Cheers to a good weekend

Liz A. said...

I'll have to check out some of those movies.

Paula Kaye said...

Richard loved trains. And he travel them quite a bit in his younger days. He even worked on trains after he graduated from high school. I have never ridden a train except for a tour train in Colorado and that was awesome!!

Tyrean Martinson said...

These sound like wonderful films! I love the theme - railways are not often used in stories these days (or at least not ones that I've read recently) and maybe it's time for them to make a comeback. :)

Anabel Marsh said...

I have definitely seen Brief Encounter and Oh! Mr Porter which was the sort of film that used to be on TV n a Sunday afternoon. I don't think BE has worn as well as, say, Casablanca. I found it all a bit stuffy.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Joanne - oh that's great .. thanks. Good too that you know Sherry and her blog. I hope you can get over and ride our railways ... as you say one day.

@ Liz - that'll be fun to see a train film or two ...

@ Paula - ah Richard was a train lover ... he certainly seemed to follow his passion for them. I'm glad you've had one ride ...

@ Tyrean - they are extraordinary films ... so we had some fun showings. It's interesting what you say about railways featuring in books - I wonder if the excitement was dying out with the arrival of the car and cruise ships ... I'm sure there's a place for a railway novel once again ... a comeback as you say.

@ Anabel - oh yes they probably were ... and something I never seemed to do for whatever reason.

Interesting what you say about Brief Encounter - we were only shown the romantic section in the station cafe ... with the trains rushing by - and some explanations about the 'tricks' played in the making of the film ... or odd pieces where the trains couldn't work like that - but even being shown: I'd have never have known!

So glad this post has interested you all ... fascinating to read your thoughts - cheers Hilary

mail4rosey said...

Look at those old trains! There's just something about them that appeals. I'd like to check out the movie with the inept train manager who ends up being one of the best ('who you know') hires ever made. :)

jabblog said...

Railways are endlessly fascinating. We're lucky enough to have a miniature steam railway not far from our house. Run and organised by volunteers, it operates once a month from April to October.

Chrys Fey said...

It would be neat to watch these four films in that theatre.

DMS said...

I have always thought traveling by train sounded fun. Interesting to see so many movies that take place on a train. I have only ever ridden a train a short distance (about 2 hours)- but I like the idea of taking one for a longer journey. :) Great post!
~Jess

Betsy Brock said...

My boys love trains, especially the old black and white documentaries about them. This is a wonderful collection of old movies! Maybe I can interest them in a few of these!

Robert Bennett said...

My niece is an absolutely huge fan of trains. Personally I'd love to say I saw the appeal, but to me they've always just been another form of transport. Cool info, nonetheless!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Rosey – they are nostalgic movies … just interpreting things the British way. Oh Mr Porter! is fun … as trains rush past …

@ Janice – the old days with the steam trains were great fun – but there are lots of train-spotters around now … I’m sure Frankie will enjoy your local steam railway – he looked sweet going off on holiday! Volunteers are an essential for running miniature and little railways …

@ Chrys – they’re putting on interesting ‘old’ classics … so we’re getting a selection – these four were a series.

@ Jess – the lure of train travel across countries seems to inspire languid thoughts as the countryside vanishes around us … I hope you can get to take a longer journey at some stage …

@ Betsy – I know your boys love trains … I expect some parts of these will totally amuse them … they may struggle with the romantic bits – but may see things I missed out (haven’t commented on either) – as they’ll be looking for the trains …

@ Robert – how wonderful to have a girl as a fan of trains … pity you don’t share her enthusiasm … perhaps you can get some of these films and watch with her …

Thanks so much – I’m just glad the films are garnering interest – cheers Hilary

beste barki said...

We have a wonderful train museum-Exporail-near Montreal. It's been quite a few years since I've visited the place. Your post reawakened a desire in me to see old trains again, Hilary.

Deborah Weber said...

Oh how fun Hilary - I'll definitely have to set about finding those films. My brother worked for many years with the railroad and I'm definitely heading him over here to read your post. While real train travel can be fun - I especially love mysteries set aboard trains. I may have to add Murder on the Orient Express to my film viewing schedule as well.

Nas said...

We don't have passenger trains in our country :(

Kathleen Valentine said...

What a very interesting concept. One of my favorite oldies is STRANGERS ON A TRAIN with Farley Granger. I remember BRIEF ENCOUNTER.

Patsy said...

I've been to Exbury. but although I was sort of aware of the train I didn't actually se it - too dazzled by the rhodies, I suspect.

cleemckenzie said...

Now I want to do three things: take a train trip, see some 40s movies and return to Exbury for a visit. Thanks Hilary.

Melissa Sugar said...

I haven't seen any of the films you wrote about, but I love traveling by train. It's so different. It's quaint and romantic and always an adventure. When my kid's dad and I traveled through Europe we did a lot of traveling by train, we had a Euro pass. I loved it when we had sleeping carts and overnight rides. It was so cool to venture down to the dining cart then come back to our room for the night. Of course we stopped for cocktails in the bar cart. I've never traveled by train in America. I don't know why. We have Amtrack and it travels quite a few places. Your post has inspired me to look into a mini trip. I think I want to take the kids to Chicago by train to see their dad's parents. I doubt they even know we have train travel. Thanks for the idea. It's really hard to surprise kids these days, but you've given me a fabulous idea.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Beste – that’ll be a wonderful trip out – I like the idea … our National Train Museum is at York in the north … enjoy it …

@ Deborah – that’s great you’ll look out for the films. Then having a brother who worked for many years with the railroad – he’d understand some of the funnier things that can happen. Murder on the Orient Express is one of the classics too …

@ Nas – gosh … how surprising … now I must check where you are.

@ Kathleen – I haven’t heard of Strangers on a Train – ah! but I see it’s a Hitchcock film; I was pleased to have seen a snippet of Brief Encounter – as I don’t think I’d seen it previously.

@ Patsy – I guessed you might have been to Exbury – now obviously if it had been a ship – you and Gary would have been right there?! The rhododendrons look magnificent …

@ Lee – well: those are excellent goals … and it’ll be good to see you at Exbury!

@ Melissa – I’ve been down to Italy and back … using sleepers – in the old days. It is quaint and romantic … but always fun.
That sounds a great idea to take your kids to see their grandparents in Chicago … and will be, as you say, be a unique surprise – what fun … and for your in-laws too.

Cheers to you all – The Underground Theatre is thrilled to know you’ve been interested in this post and their train films … thanks – enjoy your train travels … Hilary

Annalisa Crawford said...

I have never seen any of those films. How cool Eastbourne is thriving like that. Community is so important.

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

One of your pictures reminded me of Thomas the Tank. :) My son loved those stories as a toddler!

Eastbourne was lovely--I remember going there for a day trip when I was a student in London. And I like your line: " relatively small yet large enough to accommodate people with lots of interesting ideas." That's exactly the type of place my husband and I are looking to retire to (although it will need to be in the US to stay near our children!)

Christine Rains said...

I do love riding on trains, and how lovely would it be to go through gardens.

On a sidenote, I'm currently reading Bill Bryson's The Road to Little Dribbling, and I'm reminded of your blog. Bryson is taking me on a tour through England, and I'm learning so much.

Gina Gao said...

Train rides seem really fun. I think I'll try it out sometime.


www.ficklemillennial.wordpress.com

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Annalisa - the St Trinian films I had seen - knew about the others, but had never seen them ... so it was a great series. Eastbourne is a comfortable town to live in ... community is important, in that you are definitely right.

@ Elizabeth - Thomas the Tank Engine is a wonderful story for us all I think - and yes toddlers do love them ...

I remember you mentioned your visit ... it sounds as though you've found your strap line for the place where you will move to! Quite understand you wouldn't want to be away from the children ... depending where they end up.

@ Christine - I think that little railway through Exbury sounds a huge amount of fun, and with stunning countryside. Bill Bryson has captured lots of our English quirks ...for some reason I couldn't get into his way of thinking ... not sure why - but I'll try again in due course ...

@ Gina - good to see you ... that's good to read you'll be encouraged to try a train ride ...

Cheers to you all and your future train excursions .. Hilary

Jeffrey Scott said...

Nice post about railway station films.
Yes, I think I would like to check out one of those, if I were ever able to find one. Here in the states, I'm not sure how likely I would be to find one though. :(

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Jeffrey - good to see you .. and perhaps you'll find the film you'd like to see ... let's hope so: the classics still tend to be around ...all the best - Hilary

D Biswas said...

I miss train travel-- haven't done long-distance train travel in such a long time!

Thanks for all the train snippets and movies, will look up some of them.

Julie Flanders said...

What a great idea for a film festival. I love trains, although I've rarely ridden one. There is just something so romantic about them though.

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

Trevor Howard was a fabulous actor. I've seen all his movies at least twice, if not more. I grew up with an English Grandmother, so we were introduced to British films early. Who can forget any of Lawrence Oliver's films! Hi Hilary. Sorry I'm late. Same old computer issues. boo hoo.

Crystal Collier said...

I LOVE old films. Unfortunately, my brothers hated them, and they controlled the TV when I was young. It's been difficult catching up on all the amazing cinema from early filming ages, but I'm working on it.

Shannon Lawrence said...

It's always fun to see movies that were filmed nearby. We've had several filmed in our city the last couple years, which is odd, because we weren't really a filming destination previously. Usually, movie companies come out to the smaller, older town in Colorado to do historical and/or westerns. Not sure what changed. But Jane Fonda and Robert Redford are currently filming in an older area of the city.

I do love trains. I used to take the train with my grandma down to visit her mom along the Oregon and California coastline. These days, they offer train rides on our old narrow gauges to see the sights in the mountains.

Elsie Amata said...

Is it bad that I haven't heard of any of these films? The closest I came to this was riding the LIRR and the subway in NY. Does that count? :)

diedre Knight said...

Trains are so fascinating! I grew up close enough to the railyard to hear the mournful whistle daily and used to think it meant "Hello, I'm going" because though it briefly stopped, it never stayed ;-)

N. R. Williams said...

Hi Hilary
I love trains. We have one here that takes skiers up to the mountains and is said to be very scenic. I don't ski, but I'd love to ride that train some day.
Nancy

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Damyanti – train travel can be a phase we go through in life … usually nostalgic trips. That’s good .. I hope you enjoy the links.

@ Julie – the Underground Theatre put on a range of classic films .. this was just a 4 part series … and it was great to be a part of. I’ve had a few long distance train trips and they are rewarding …

@ Joylene – you’re right about Trevor Howard and when a film comes up with him in it – I try and watch. The classic actors do stand out … Laurence Olivier – he brought films and plays to life. I hope that computer gets sorted out …

@ Crystal – I’ve never really got into old films – but now I’m making an effort to go down and watch the films as they come up. Oh oh brothers and that tv remote control – not at all fair. That’s really excellent to see you’re working your way through various classic films that appeal … I think I must do more.

@ Shannon – how interesting the movie companies are filming in the city – perhaps some tax breaks, or new venues … seems most likely – still good they are around and offering work to the public …

Gosh your trips down the Oregon, Californian coastline must have been wonderful – so glad you remember them and enjoyed them and to see your great grandmother. It’s fascinating what rail trips have been brought back to life … I’d love to take one – sometime …

@ Elsie – no not at all … they are British films. The Long Island Railway must be a fun ride too … the underground not so much! But impressive builds …

@ Diedre – what a fun thought … “Hello, I’m going …” as the whistle blew and off it went … memories … on its own journey of life …

@ Nancy – oh those mountain lines are fantastic and such a boon for the skiing industry. Why not take an excursion up the mountain … many must do just that – something to look forward to …

So glad this post brought back some early memories for many of you – and ideas for future trips at some stage … enjoy any classic films you might watch … cheers Hilary

Ana coelho said...

Hi Hilary loved your post I had not ridden on a train until I came to England! And I love seeing the countryside fly by. Take care Ana..

Lynn said...

The old films like that are my favorites - especially the black and white ones. We used to have a cinema that was devoted to just those films and it was always packed. It closed, for some reason - long ago, but I still miss it.

What a wondrous area you have moved to! I love trains, too.

Jacqui Murray said...

This post sure brings back memories. There is something about trains. Every successful character seems to end up on a train (I'm thinking of Hercule Poirot right now).

Inger said...

What a lovely post! I'm such a train enthusiast and happy to live in a town famous for it's railway and the Loop, which helps trains climb the steep mountain from the valley below to our town at 4000 ft. Looking forward to reading more about the history of your town.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

Those railroads are so cute. Our local community worked together to rescue a railroad spur that only runs between two small towns nowadays. They run specials on holidays. The films must have been quite entertaining.

Mark Noce said...

So cool:) The 1930s and 40s was a special time in the UK for sure:)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Ana - it is a wonderful way of seeing the countryside ... especially if one can ride a slower train ...

@ Lynn - oh what fun ... having that dedicated B and W cinema ... I bet it was always packed. Sad it closed ... but such is life sometimes. I've actually lived here for over 24 years ... but now I'm not travelling around so much ...

@ Jacqui - the stories around trains must be fascinating ... and Agatha Christie formed quite a few of her plots on train journeys ... the Hercule Poirot mysteries are entertaining reads ...

@ Inger - oh yes of course your Bakersfield or Tehachapi loop ... I remember your posts about it ... fascinating how it can see its back from its front! 4,000 feet is quite a climb. Thanks yes I must do the write ups ...

@ Susan - we have quite a few heritage lines around Britain ... and they inspire many to get involved, where they learn lots of skills - good for the young with an interest. Your railroad spur sounds a useful link, as well as a fun day out. The films were fun to find out more about as well as to watch ...

@ Mark - there was quite a lot of acting and creating going on ...

Thanks everyone - so glad the train theme here amused many of you ... it's fun reading the memories many of you have ... cheers Hilary

Misha Gericke said...

I like the idea of themed film seasons. :-)

Hope you're doing well!

Nick Wilford said...

Sounds like a great film festival, also an interesting snippet about Eastbourne preceding Brighton as the first seaside resort? I have to say, films like Titfield Thunderbolt and the Great St Trinian's Train Robbery remind me of my dad, because he had them and many other train movies on VHS (now on DVD). I've inherited his love of trains, and I love a miniature railway. Of course, Brief Encounter is one of my mum's favourites!

Maddy Maddocks said...

This post is certainly after my husband's own heart, Hillary. He has these films in his railway archives. 😊

Elise Fallson said...

I would love to take long trips and travel by train, I just wish it wasn't so expensive. The Exbury Steam train through the gardens looks so lovely! There is something romantic about traveling by train..... Have a lovely week Hilary and thank you for sharing another great post with us. :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Misha - we have a railway expert in our midst .. hence the themed railways film season ... all ok over here - thank you ...

@ Nick - it was an interesting snippet about George III's children holidaying down here in 1780 ... so I shall expand. We didn't tend to get these sorts of films at home ... but I definitely saw the St Trinian's ones ... that's lovely you have inherited his love of trains - you should drop in the odd post about them into your blog? ... ah - now I can't find out if my mother remembers Brief Encounter ... but wonderful you have heard your mother speak of it ...

@ Maddy - I knew your hubby is a railway fanatic ... so good to know he would approve of these ...

@ Elise - travelling isn't cheap is it - the little I've done (tour type trips) have triggered my emotions. I agree the Exbury steam train does look a great ride - so glad it took you away into train trip land - briefly!

Cheers and I'm so glad so many of you enjoyed the post ... thanks - Hilary

Juliet Batten said...

Oh, trains! How fascinating and romantic they are. Thank you Hillary for the train journeys.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Juliet - so glad you enjoyed the post and stories about trains ... cheers Hilary