Saturday, 5 November 2016

St Nicolas Church, Pevensey and William the Conqueror ... covering a fund-raising evening ...



I went back for another fund-raising event talk on William the Conqueror (1028 – 1087) – on 14th October – 950 years to the day when he landed on our shores … to conquer this land and then ...


St Nicolas Church



... to inherit the English crown of a relatively ordered and settled country … 1066 has become probably the best known date in our historical record.





Halley's Comet in 1066 -
a positive omen


However the law of unintended consequences occurred just over 500 years later, in 1582, when the switch to the Gregorian calendar we use today was started (this was not entirely finished until 1929 – Great Britain and the British colonies (including Ireland) changed in 1752) … so actually William landed at Pevensey on 27th October.







Showing where the sea levels were in 1066 and today, as well as some of the village and town names
If William had been able to walk to Senlac Hill ... it is about 12 miles; but it is about 30 miles to
walk round via Hailsham;  he could have sent some ships into the Bulverhyth.e
(my photo - which is not brilliant ... but I've left it large - so place names can be checked etc.)


This is how the talk was ‘advertised’ to us via email:


To mark the historic 950th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings, Peter Harrison, Curator of Pevensey Museum and Goal will give a 45 minute talk with this intriguing title: ‘Unintended Consequences of the Battle of Hastings’. The story of the Battle of Hastings is well known, but not some of its the consequences.


The 'Mora' - the ship Matilda had built for William
to use for his journey across the English Channel


The arrival of King William (‘the Bastard’) inspired, as we know, the Norman period of history in much of mainland Britain.





The subsequent prolific building of castles and churches of which a great number survive in whole or in part, and the giving of land to Barons the length and breadth of the land, are recorded in the Domesday Day Book (completed in 1086).


Matilda of Flanders: A Victorian artist's
romantic impression (1894)




He changed what had hitherto been the Anglo-Saxon country, to the one which carries with it today, apart from our form of government, much what can be directly attributed to the Normans and their arrival 950 years ago, from France at Pevensey.






William - as portrayed in the
Bayeux Tapestry
At this stage in our history most people were known by their Christian or first names taken from the kings and saints … Egbert, Alfred, Ethelred (the Unready {ill-advised}) Arthur, Cnut … or Cuthbert, Aidan, Wilfrid and Edward (the Confessor was canonised in about 1161) …


… the name ‘William’ became very popular after the Norman conquest … originally of old Germanic origin: ‘Wilhelm’ – it was another of our great kings, Henry VIII, who ordered that marital births be recorded under the surname of the father, when that became the norm to distinguish members of the population.




William and Matilda's marks -
neither of them could read or write



William had what appears to be a very happy marriage for over 30 years to Matilda of Flanders, a powerful ally in Normandy.



Recording that the Mora led about 1,400 vessels
of varying sort across the English Channel ...
note her square sail and graceful hull in the image
above. The ship was designed and constructed
 like a Viking ship.



She had a long-ship built for William ... it was called the Mora … and was the fastest ship in the invasion fleet …  so fast did it speed that William had time to stop mid-channel, take a repast – where he dined well with spiced wine waiting for his fleet to catch up!





A record of the Mora is to be found in the Normans’ Ships List of 1070 AD … while being shown in the Bayeux Tapestry ... no record of the Mora has ever been found in southern England or in France/Normandy …


The fleet consisted of  (it is thought) 700 fighting ships, with
another 700 vessels bringing supplies, soldiers etc

… William left his ships in Pevensey Bay in case of need for a retreat … some may have been used to travel across the Bay to Hastings … but little archaeological evidence has come to light.  




(It costs a great deal of money to have a serious archaeological dig … so for now it hasn’t been done – however if any disturbance occurs … new roads, housing – then historians and archaeologists are on hand in case something noteworthy is recorded and needs detailed future analysis).


Normandy, France

He secured his tenure in England, when he was back in Normandy, through governance by his Norman barons in the twenty years that followed the famous battle of 1066; he and Matilda often crossed the Channel, before settling for the last time in 1087 in Normandy.



As Peter Harrison explains in his introductory note above … the country was for ever changed … we, and many of you, have arrived in the 21st century experiencing the continued effects of William’s reign.




St Nicolas’ Church where the talk was held … is believed to have been built on earlier churches from Saxon days and then from Norman times before the Church we know today was started to be built in its present form 800 years ago … (1205 – 1216). 





Rose wine 1066  from the
Carr Taylor Estate 
Carr Taylor, local wine producers, put on a reception for us … we had their 1066 wine (white or rosé) with some snacks provided by the churchgoers … excellent wine, elderflower pressé and delicious tasty bites …


It made for a very convivial and happy time for all attendees … we had experts on hand to answer questions re William, or Pevensey, the Battle, or the Church itself …


Look away now if you're hungry!


… friends old and new to talk to … while we munched snacks, or mulled ideas over crisp, light and refreshing 1066 wine …



As you can see a delicious spread





The church is fundraising to repair the tower, east and south walls, which are in serious need of some attention … so concerts are put on, talks are organised – it is a hive of industriousness  encouraging donations.






Harley-Davidson Sportster model (2002)


The Bishop of Lewes attended … he is long and lanky and a delight to chat to … I was reliably informed he’d arrived on his Harley Davidson!  Just the sort of Bishop we need … he is the area bishop within the Diocese of Chichester, under which we fall.





The 15th C Caen stone Font - the intricately
carved wooden Victorian lantern hood
is about 1890
Oh and I have to tell you an anecdote about the wine … I thought they had some of the Carr Taylor wine for sale … and asked if I could have a bottle … at that stage there was demand for a refill of glasses … so I wandered off to converse …


… upon returning and asking about the wine – I was told of course I could have a bottle … whereupon he reached down and brought up an empty! 



We both looked at each … amusement and amazement in our eyes – as we’d realised we were at different ends of the wine bottle … one full, one empty … I laughed and said I’d completely misunderstood – and didn’t really want an empty bottle!


Pevensey village 'main road': the Castle is behind me as I
took the photo ... the Court House is up ahead, while
the Church is down a parallel lane 
I did thoroughly enjoy the evening, and I’d been around earlier in the day visiting the Court House, Museum as it is now and the Gaol … to check them out for future posts.  I’d had another look around the church …



… then the talk gave us further information, enlightened by being with other interested parties, and we learnt about the Pageant that was performed in 1908 … this deserves a full post of its own.






Eastern curtilage of Pevensey Castle - some of
the Pageant will be re-enacted within its boundaries

History is amazing … I wonder what parishioners and visitors will be using the Church for in a few centuries … I’m certain those medieval parishioners would never have thought about a Pageant in the ruined Castle grounds or a Reception provided by the local wine estate.




Feasting - shown on Bayeux Tapestry


I’ve put in a few extra photos from around or in the Church … with some extra descriptions …


This once again is long … but there’s a lot to cover, to make the post entertaining and generally encourage visitors to our part of the world.  Happy Reading! 



Carr Taylor Wine Estate – its vineyard is close enough to the Battle of Hastings site … so their 1066 wine is very appropriate.

St Nicolas Church, Pevensey – Wikipedia site

St Nicolas 800 – this is the fund raising site for the Church … helped with Lottery funding.  There’s a little about the history of Virginia, USA here … near the gravestone pictured.

My earlier post:  St Nicolas Church, Pevensey - archaeology and William the Conqueror (with an anecdote about some American students from Herstmonceux).


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

58 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

HOW I wish that history had been better taught while I was at school.
It was essentially a recitation of dates, rulers and battles.
I came to history late - and love it. I am not sure I can ever catch up for decades of ignorance though. A work in progress.
Thank you so much.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks EC - I only started learning when I began blogging nearly 9 years ago ... and now supplement that with attending various local classes: University of the Third Age; and talks or events around Eastbourne or occasionally further afield. Cheers Hilary

Suzanne Furness said...

Another fascinating post, Hilary. 1066 wine sounds interesting and very fitting, I hope you manage to get your hands on a full bottle at some point! What a lovely array of snacks for you to enjoy alongside too. I think so many old churches are in need of repair ... and the work does not come cheap. Opening them up more to local events and as places for community functions is an excellent idea. I am currently reading into some history about Mawgan Church (the village where my mother lived and I was married in) they are trying to raise money for repairs and are trying to attract a wider number of visitors, schools, local groups and so on.
On another note ... glad you enjoyed my photo of Porthkidney, the church of St Uny is in a wonderful location, what a lovely place for your brother's wedding.

Rhodesia said...

I have to agree with Elephant's child, if only we had of had a good history mistress. I hated history at school, it was boring, and the woman sounded like she had no interest in what she was trying to teach us. Sadly now I regret it so much as trying to catch up when one is older is not so easy. There is so much history around us that it is hard to take it all in.
I love your posts and the story about the bottle of wine is so funny. Keep up the good work. Have a good weekend Diane

suesconsideredtrifles said...

This is very interesting, Hilary. The map of sea levels in particular. I am just rereading Puck of Pook's Hill and Rewards and Fairies, which mention Pevensey. Sue

Out on the prairie said...

I hope the bishop didn't have too much wine, I have a hard time riding my Harley with even a few drinks. I love the history cited, it is interesting that churches were often built on the same site. I hope they can do the castle repairs and make it good for another ten centuries.

Mike Goad said...

Interesting post...,again. Normandy, Wil;liam, and the changing coastline. ;)

Joanne said...

Wine, snacks, and history all in a splendid setting. Very cool cause. You get out and attend such interesting events. Thanks for sharing.

TexWisGirl said...

laughing at the wine bottle mix-up. :) neat church! hope they raised good funds.

Terra Hangen said...

Fascinating, I love British history. That fundraiser talk and feast must have been fun to attend. Cool bishop arriving on his Harley; our son has a Harley.

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

Incredibly interesting, Hillary. I especially like how they came up with the surnames Johnson, Jamison, Robertson, etc. Son of John, son of James, son of Robert. Guess Johndaughter wouldn't have worked as well.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Suzanne – wonderful you enjoyed it so much. I hope to get hold of a 1066 bottle at some stage too … I probably need to make a trip across Sussex to the estate.

The Church put on the snacks … they were brilliant – I must put a note in the post about this … done that!

St Mawgan Church must be lovely – those old Cornish churches have so much history … that will make a fascinating post or two at some stage. Lovely to know it was where your mother lived and where you were married … those churches are special and so full of memories – which get added to over the years.

Fund-raising for churches … is a real challenge (difficult one) … Your post on Porthkidney Beach brought back many memories from years ago …

@ Diane – I hated history at school, got it the second time! But it’s really only since I’ve been blogging I’ve picked up so much history … taught myself in a comfortable way. Learnt from other bloggers … yours on France …
Just glad the bottle of wine anecdote amused!

@ Sue – yes I’m going to write about harbours and how sea levels have changed so much … not sure when: but it will pop up. I noted about Kipling being involved with the Pageant held in 1908 – I will do that write up … and I really should read Kipling’s works again …

@ Steve – I’m sure the Bishop didn’t have too much to drink … he did disappear quite quickly – but it was nice to see him supporting the church.

In this country most of our buildings are built on something else … there’s a Roman Villa down by the pier in Eastbourne … probably a Victorian hotel was built on top of it – so they can’t ascertain exactly where the footprint will be. They did trace a bit more this summer …

The Castle is irreparable … but has been made safe … but they can’t put it back … we have the footprint of its extent … and the village which links in … we know about the coastline along from Eastbourne …

Whether the Castle and coastline will survive another 1,000 years is up to nature! Storms can be devastating …

@ Mike – good to see you … yes, lots going on here … especially the changing coastline …

@ Joanne – exactly what more could we want … a chauffeur to drive me home?! No I had half a glass … which was very good. I’ve got really interested in the history of the Sussex and Pevensey era … so I take opportunities if they’re offered.

@ Theresa – yes I laughed too ... and guessed you’d enjoy the anecdote – proving so. They are doing lots of fund-raising … and seem to be on the way … the Heritage Lottery helps hugely …

@ Terra – it was all very informative and a thoroughly enjoyable evening – I loved it …

@ Joylene – thanks so much … yes I didn’t go into surnames etc … but one day I’ll do that post. I’d love to do one on names of places etc ... and how we can work out from place names what the landscape was like before humans interfered!

Cheers to you all – and thanks so much for commenting and adding interesting notes to your thoughts … happy weekends - Hilary

Jo said...

1066 and all that eh? It is amazing how many things changed and how many benefits we actually gained from that invasion. I always think of the beginning of Ivanhoe when the herdsman and the jester (I think) are discussing that animals have Saxon names until the are presented for the table when they become Norman, i.e. swine became porc and cattle became boeuf.

You do go to some interesting talks Hilary and I am so glad you share them with us. I have never seen the Bayeux Tapestry. Where is it?

By the way, I completely forgot that it was November 5th today. I normally always make a comment in my blog. I was wondering if Guy Fawkes would be pleased or upset that he is still remembered.

A Cuban In London said...

Fascinating! I knew about the battle of Hastings but all that other information was new to me. Many thanks.

Greetings from London.

L. Diane Wolfe said...

William is German? I guess my uncle William Wittmeyer was aptly named.

That spread of food looks delicious.

Marja said...

Such interesting history, which is the history of many people here too as most people are descendants of of the english Therefore we have a Hastings here as well. Love to ear where names come from. My husbands name is William and I didn't know that it came from a germanic name. My maiden name is germanic as well.
I also wonder of St Nicholas church is named after the same St Nicholas which is celebrated in Holland, the bishop from Mira

Betsy Brock said...

What a wonderful thing to repair the tower! I love events like this for good causes!

Robert Bennett said...

Wow! What an absolutely amazing read. I think I'm gonna pass this on to my wife. I'm sure she'll thoroughly enjoy it.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Jo – it is interesting how the names of animals are used, which are of Anglo-Saxon origin, while the food they produce is the loan word from France … pig and pork, cow and beef, deer and venison. The English farmer nurtured the animal – the French overlord then ate it! I remember you mentioning this before and I’d noted it – Shakespeare highlighted the differences.

I enjoy going to different things … and the more I visit the more I learn. The Bayeux Tapestry was probably organised by Bishop Odo, William’s half-brother, who lived in Kent and ruled on behalf of William, when he was back in Normandy.

It’s thought it was made in Kent – but is now in the Bayeux Museum in Bayeux, a few miles from the coast, and a few miles west of Caen, where the stone for Canterbury and the font, shown in the post, came from.

I’m not sure Guy Fawkes would be happy to be remembered, but he is and he made his mark … though the torture (common I know in those days) must have been horrendous …

@ ACIL – I know 1066 and ‘all that’ is what we know … but further details seem to escape us. I learnt too …

@ Diane – the name has an old Germanic origin … so many of our names and words are not English per se … so your uncle was very aptly named. The snacks were very good and were well tucked into …

@ Marja – St Nicolas is commemorated and revered among Anglican, Catholic, Lutheran and Orthodox Christians … he is the patron saint of sailors, merchants, archers etc etc and apparently did come from Myra …

Yes, I saw a lot of English towns in Southern Africa, as too German ones, and I spot them in Australia, New Zealand and the Americas … William is an old Germanic name ..

@ Betsy – it’s a lovely church … and seems to be well supported, which is really good.

@ Robert – many thanks … and I do hope your wife enjoys the story line – as well as perhaps looking back at part one …

Thanks everyone – well I’ve added to the post in some ways and could easily write up more … just so glad you enjoyed it. Cheers Hilary

Patsy said...

We went to Battle - Abbey and Battlefield - earlier this year. It seems the site of the battle is now in dispute, but luckily we happened to go to the place which is now thought the most likely spot too.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Funny his boat was so fast he had to stop and wait for the others to catch up.
I wouldn't have wanted an empty bottle either.

H.R. Sinclair, Southpaw said...

I love the wine bottle story. I can picture it perfectly.

Connie Arnold said...

Your posts are always so interesting! It's good to learn new things (new to me but old things actually with the historic aspect). Thank you for sharing this information and about the good cause. Funny about the wine bottle! Most enjoyable post!

beste barki said...

There is always so much to learn. I was under the impression that Guillaume was a version of William in Frnech.

Liz A. said...

Ah yes, unintended consequences. How mighty those are.

The whole calendar thing is quite funny. Did you know the Russian team missed the 1908 Olympics because they were still on the Julian calendar?

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Patsy - yes they do think the battle might have been held where a round-about is now ... I thought the graphics etc in that tv programme (Time Team) were really interesting ... it's a lovely part of the world though.

@ Alex - I know, the Mira being so fast through the water and speeding ahead of his fleet - still he did the best thing ... had a 'pit stop' and a meal! I was sad I didn't get a full bottle of wine!

@ Holly - thanks ... I had to put the wine story in ..

@ Connie - glad you enjoyed the post ... we know the basics don't we - but I'm loving acquiring more historical knowledge ... especially if it's in a beautiful building, with good company, wine and snacks ...

@ Beste - there always is so much to learn ... and yes the French had some input into 'William' but according to Wiki .. it's of old Germanic origin .. but the mix of language in the Anglo-Saxon and medieval eras happened all the time.

@ Liz - the Law of Unintended Consequences .. such a good law. I'd no idea about the Russian team missing the 1908 Olympics ... I'd picked up that a French runner didn't realise a race had been brought forward specifically for the King of the Belgians (not for a calendar mix-up) ... so having eaten a full meal, still had to run his 10,000 metres race?! Yes the result was rather yucky ...

So I hadn't picked up the whole team missing the 1908 Olympics as Russia was still on Julian calendar time ... thanks for telling us!

Cheers to you all ... from a stormy and now cold Eastbourne ... Hilary

Lynn said...

What a lovely event! So funny that he thought you wanted an empty bottle - I hope you can get a full one soon. Your neck of the world is a fascinating place.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

You have so many amazing historical sites in your country but along with them is the cost of upkeep which I'm sure many visitors don't consider. I found it so interesting that William could not read or write, but I guess it was not a common skill way back then.

Gattina said...

It seems to me that I have been to a flower show in the St. Nicolas church years ago ! Very interesting the history of the Battle of Hastings !
Your buffet looks fabulous !!

Crystal Collier said...

Hilary! I almost placed my 3rd book in 1065. It was the original intention, but it shifted forward two centuries. I would have loved to have been at that convention with you. I laughed out loud about the bottle incident.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lynn - it was a wonderful event ... I wish I did want an empty bottle ... but I wanted to take a photo of the label - which I did, but mine was out of focus! I do need a full one though. We are just lucky in Britain there is so much to see, to do or to uncover ...

@ Susan - yes things do cost and philanthropy is stretched many ways. We're also on the coast, so don't have that 360 degrees range of neighbourhoods - I don't think the fish would be prepared to come and listen!

I'm glad I picked up that William or Matilda could not write .. and remembered to note it ... we just forget that that's the way it was ...

@ Gattina - you may well have been to a flower show at the Church ... the Battle of Hastings is fascinating even now. The buffet was very good ..

@ Crystal - oh what a pity ... but possibly easier to shift the series forward slightly .. it does sound intriguing, I must say. Oh some of the talks we have are wonderful ... and I'd love to do more ...

- the bottle incident was funny, to put it mildly ... I was slightly sheepish about it!!

Thanks so much for visiting and commenting ... always good to see everyone - cheers Hilary

Fil said...

1066 is the only date I remember from history classes - it's a pity our teacher wasn't as interesting as you are Hilary - I reckon I'd have remembered a lot more had you been teaching it :)
Great post

cleemckenzie said...

The idea of walking along the path of such history always excites me and makes me want to know more about the time and the people who were there before me. I enjoyed seeing the map and how the landscape has changed over the centuries.

When I visited Hastings, I also went to Battle where they proudly proclaim to be the place where the Battle of Hastings actually happened. Are they telling us Yanks the truth? :-)

Karen Lange said...

I do so enjoy learning about history now versus when I was in grade school. Thanks so much for sharing this rich, interesting portion of history with us. Thanks also for taking us "along" to the fundraiser. :) Sounds like it was a fun event! Have a great week!

DMS said...

I love learning history here. You are such a fun teacher. Of course, you made me very hungry with the snack photos- but they just helped me see what a delightful event it was. :) Wonderful post!
~Jess

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Fil - I think that's probably right, though now I'm definitely improving! It's taken me decades to get this far ... I didn't like history then either ...

@ Lee - I am learning more about the peoples of early Eastbourne ... Bronze Age and on - thankfully we have people who are prepared to let us know what is happening and bring their findings to life for us (me)etc. I'm glad the map helped and shows the landscape change - sometimes we think the land is static ... not so

They are not sure exactly where the battle actually took place - it was promulgated that it occurred in the grounds of Battle Abbey ... and then recently after some digital sensing of the landscape that perhaps it is nearby - so it is within the town of Battle, which is about six miles from the coast at Hastings. But as they've never found a mass of finds - it is difficult to pinpoint the area down. So yes thankfully!! they are telling us and you Yanks the truth to the best of their knowledge!!

@ Karen - oh so do I .. perhaps we can put the basics of the world into perspective and as our layers of historical knowledge grow ... things slot into place more easily. I'm happy you enjoyed the various aspects I posted ...

@ Jess - many thanks - I enjoy writing up the posts .. especially as I have such interested parties coming across to read ...

Thanks so much for your comments - I'm just delighted you enjoy my take on history and this fund-raising event in particular ... cheers Hilary

Susan Kane said...

This post had me from the first word to the last. Such a string of history, each one creating their own knots. Loved it.

M. Denise C. said...

Thank you for the most interesting post, Hilary! I enjoyed it immensely and once again learned much. My best, Denise

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan - so glad you enjoyed it and the follow through to the end with the fund-raising knot! Delighted - thank you ...

@ Denise - that's wonderful ... and am glad you learnt much too ...

Good to see you and cheers Hilary

Rhonda Albom said...

Thanks for all the history. I learned some things I didn't know.

Chrys Fey said...

The empty wine bottle made me laugh. I'm so silly that I would've kept it. :P

Lynda R Young said...

It is a fascinating time in history.

diedre Knight said...

Another lovely post, Hilary. Always fascinating history. I would have kept the empty wine bottle as a keepsake ;-) I'd dearly love to walk around inside a castle one day.

Denise Covey said...

Wow, I never knew the Gregorian calendar went back to 1582. You learn something every day as they say! History is so fascinating.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Rhonda - that's good ... I'm glad you enjoyed the history ..

@ Chrys - the wine bottle story ... yes I probably should have kept it and at least then I'd have a photo of the label, which came out blurred.

@ Lynda - there's so much going on in history ... I learnt lots more about our area here last night ...

@ Diedre - you're like Chrys - I should have kept the wine bottle ... but I'm attempting to downsize (somehow!). We have lots of castles too - I did an A-Z on castles in 2012 ... I selected 26 of different types and in different areas of the UK ...

@ Denise - it's one of those quirks of history ... its introduction in 1582, then it took 350 years or so for all parts of the world to catch up, adapt and change ...

Thanks so much for visiting and commenting ... cheers Hilary

Juliet Batten said...

Hilary, you always tell me things I didn't know. It's fascinating to hear about William, his long marriage and the fact that neither of them could read nor write. You really give a picture of the times. Thank you.

Friko said...

Very interesting.
The English make such wonderful fund raising events. we have many of them, for all sorts of charities; Churches and castles etc. need endless repairs.

I love that anecdote about the ‘bottle’ At a recent even in our village hall wine was to be had by the glass (and paid for). It seemed that some at our table felt a small glass was hardly worth getting up for so they asked if they could have a whole bottle for the table. The ‘bartender’ agreed and one of us fetched bottle after bottle, at a suitably increased price. We haven’t lived that down yet and have gone into the annals of Valley’s End as the ‘boozy table’.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Juliet - we forget don't we how much life has changed ... the reading and writing thing ... yes it seems Matilda was a stabilising force for William ... I'm delighted I created an a feeling of the life they were leading - thank you ...

@ Friko - we do manage to pull together when it comes to raising funds as you say for all sorts of causes ... this was a wonderful event.

How funny ... love the story of your boozy wine table ... and you could all walk home - that makes a difference. That's excellent you've the reputation round the village - love that thought ... I sure hope the 'annals' of Valley's End are recorded for posterity in 1,000 years time?!

Lovely comments from the two of you ... such a delight to see you both - cheers Hilary

Elsie Amata said...

The church reminds me of the one I attended growing up. Such beautiful architecture.I love it. How cool that the Bishop rode up on a Harley. Go him!

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Thanks for all the additional history tidbits. From my school days, I still remember the basic facts about the Battle of Hastings, but I don't recall ever being taught anything about its repercussions. Nowadays, I wonder if U.S. students are taught about the Battle of Hastings at all.

Have a wonderful weekend. Cheers!

LD Masterson said...

I love the reading about the history of England. Why does it always seem more interesting than US history? And I love the Bishop on a Harley.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Elsie - I'm glad the Church brings back early memories. I know - the Bishop obviously likes his machines - makes it easier to get around ... and park.

@ Susan - many of us remember those basic facts ... but the extra layers I love learning about. Yes, I'd wondered what history Americans are taught now - presumably some South American and some Canadian ... I hope some European history too ...

@ LD - there's more to it I guess ... then some of you got up and left for the new land of America!! I have to say I do enjoy history now... yes, our Bishop brought a touch of modernity to his position ...

Cheers and thanks for visiting - a peaceful Remembrance weekend - Hilary

Keith's Ramblings said...

It's good now again to remind ourselves of what once went on where our feet now tread.


Visit Keith's Ramblings

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Keith - too true ... and we walk those paths of ancient times all the while - actually probably drive them ... I mostly do ... cheers Hilary

Susan Scott said...

What a intersting snapshot of this history Hilary and how lovely to be able to attend! The photos are lovely - I laughed at you being offered an empty bottle! (which of course you could fill with your favourite tipple - I wouldn't be surprised if the word 'tipple' comes from the 11th Century).

I hope the event was able to raise the much needed funds ...

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Susan - sorry this must have slipped through ... but I must have seen it - as I picked up the word 'tipple' and thought that'd make a good Christmas post - but I didn't do it! Still I will ... as it's an interesting word.

I'm not sure how much they raised .. a lot is needed ...

Thanks so much for coming by - cheers Hilary

Deniz Bevan said...

Thanks for sharing your delightful evening with us, Hilary!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Deniz .. it was an informative and fun evening ... cheers Hilary