Thursday, 13 April 2017

K is for Kashmiri Goat …



K is for Kingly behaviour from the Kashmiri Goat … and if Billy misbehaves as he did – he gets demoted!  He’s also been retired, and …

Kashmiri Feral Goat on Great Orme


… a new Kashmiri Goat had to be found … it took 30 members of the lst Battalion Welch Fusiliers scouring Great Orme in Llandudno to find our new William Windsor …



This tradition of having goats in the military originated in 1775, when a wild goat walked onto the battlefield in Boston during the American Revolution and led the Welsh regimental colours at the end of the Battle of Bunker Hill.


Great Orme is a limestone headland, on the north
coast of Wales next to Llandudno


The Royal Goat feral herd thrive on the Great Orme … with a tradition from 1844 of the British monarchy presenting a Kashmiri Goat to the Royal Welch Fusiliers.




The “Goat Major” is in charge of Fusilier William Windsor II …


William Windsor 1 in 2000
I have spelt "Royal Welch Fusiliers" correctly … they were a line of infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Prince of Wales’ Division – founded in 1689 to oppose James II and to take part in the imminent war with France.


It is one of the oldest infantry regiments, hence the archaic spelling of “Welch” …




The new Fusilier William Windsor II
c/o PA



At this point – that is enough … further information available from the Wonderful Wiki … but this is how we have a “K” for Kashmiri Goat in the A-Z of 2016!



That is K for a Kicking Kashmiri, actually William Windsor I head-butted a drummer – hence his demotion and subsequent retirement … William Windsor II so far is behaving himself … from Aspects of British County Rare Breeds …


Counties with the letter K …
 (note some Counties have been retired!, or amended over historical local government … but some I’ve included)
England:  Kent
Northern Ireland: None
Scotland:  Kincardineshire; Kinross-shire; Kirkcudbrightshire
Wales:  None - but they do have a Kashmiri Goat!


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

37 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

Kudos for yet another fascinating entry. Kashmiri goats undoubtedly have a beautiful fleece, but it doesn't sound as if it is easy to obtain...

Courtney Turner said...

Hilly, a goat in the military? From the American Revolutionary War? How strange, but it's kind of cool. Maui Jungalow

Sylvia van Bruggen said...

Oh my gosh, these goats are the bee's knees. So gorgeous!

I had no idea about goats being in the military! And The Goat Major! How awesome is that? Really in awe of these goats, headbutts and all :)

Nilanjana Bose said...

How awesome to have a 'Goat Major' even though he might misbehave from time to time...

I wonder is this the breed that gives the Pashmina?


Nila
Madly-in-Verse

Michelle Wallace said...

I have to say that, when I read the post title, the very first thing that popped into my mind was The Kashmir Shawl which is a book by Rosie Thomas. It's on my TBR list.
...and now I'm thinking that's where the word cashmere comes from...?

FinnBadger said...

Great letter K. And I'd behave myself too if I was a goat mascot - he probably is better taken care of then I am!

Mail art from A to Z.

Phillip | K is for Kraft paper envelopes

Jo said...

Poor William I. One head butt and he was out. I remember seeing the military goat, but never really thought much about it. So, the breed really started in the US?

Keith's Ramblings said...

William 'Billy Goat' 1 was clearly a bit gruff that day! Another really interesting piece Hilary.

K day in Amble Bay!

Jean Davis said...

He's a pretty goat, with a hard head I assume. I'm sure the drummer wasn't all that happy about the encounter.
Discarded Darlings - Jean Davis, Speculative Fiction Writer, A to Z: Editing Fiction

Out on the prairie said...

Some can get feisty. A camp I went as a youngster to had one that would pick a subject at random and knock them down.My daughter had a mean one who ended up curried.

Suzanne Furness said...

I'd heard of goats in the military but didn't know the story behind why until now. Very interesting post.

Susan Scott said...

Those are very fine royal looking goats indeed Hilary ... are their horns called antlers? They too are very fine. Thank you - no billy goat about them ...

bazza said...

Why does "Kashmiri Goat" make me think of curry?
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s recondite Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Lynn said...

I like William Windsor II's finery! So funny that the WWI had to be retired for head butting. :)

Rhodesia said...

Another interesting and fascinating post with much to learn from. You are a walking encyclopaedia. Have a good Easter weekend Diane

Bob Scotney said...

Being butted by William Windsor is another way of getting on my goat.

M. Denise C. said...

William Windsor 2 does not look as dignified as William Windsor 1! I guess appearances are deceiving. Cheers, Hilary! Denise

Chicky Kadambari said...

A goat in the military! Really? :D
Well, he sure looks handsome. Is he really from Kashmir though? Or is he just called that?
Happy AtoZing!
Chicky @ www.mysteriouskaddu.com

Inger said...

I hope #2 behaves himself because his horns are fierce! And I lived in Kent for about a year. In a vicarage in Lee Green, where I looked after the kids, human ones. And assorted kiddie animals, but no goats.

Betsy Brock said...

So funny the goat is all dressed up and sticks out his tongue! A goat will still be a goat, I suppose! haha.

Deborah Weber said...

Oh I do love a good photo with the subject's tongue sticking out. The new Major Goat seems like an entirely likeable fellow. I can't help but wonder if the former MG was demoted for honestly expressing a musical criticism of the drummer's performance.

Liz A. said...

There's a mayor cat so why not a major goat.

John Holton said...

"Welch" is how my grandmother's maiden name was spelled.

What kid goes home and tells his parents "I want to be the Goat Major for the Royal Welch Fusiliers"?

Lenny Lee said...

hi grandblogmum!

wow! another interesting post. too bad ww 1 got "kicked" out of the service for head butting a drummer. maybe the drummer was a lousy drummer and deserved to get a good kick. the u.s. navy academy had a goat mascot. according to wiki "The first Bill the Goat appeared in 1893. Currently, Bill XXXIII reigns as the 36th mascot and is the 33rd goat to be named Bill."

SENCO Cat Herder said...

I can remember watching Blue Peter as a child and seeing them meet the newest goat then - a long, long time ago but glad to see this tradition has made it through to the 21st century! Lovely to have made it over again to your blog posts and won't be a stranger :) http://pempispalace.blogspot.co.uk/2017/04/k-is-for-kids-kingdom.html

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC – thanks so much … they are related to cashmeres – which originated in the reaches of the Himalayas … Pakistan in the east, India, Nepal, Bhutan, Mongolia and China …

@ Courtney – yes … thankfully they didn’t call him Hilly! Strange things happen – but Billy or the goat at that time became an important mascot for them … after wandering onto the battlefield in Boston …

@ Sylvia – aren’t they lovely … the Goat Major is very real, especially today …

@ Nila – it makes the Welsh Fusiliers stand out on parade – and yes it is the breed of goat – it varies in different countries – that gives us the Pashmina …

@ Michelle – I’ve added Rosie’s book to my wish list – and you’re right that’s where cashmere comes from …

@ Phillip – you’re probably right about the mascot being better looked after than most of us! Lucky goat I think …

@ Jo – probably not one head butt ... just a few –but enough to be disruptive and spoil the parade … no the breed started in the Himalayan region … but the one in the States wandered onto the battlefield … and stayed – then they took him back home across the ocean …

@ Keith – poor old William I disgraced himself at the Queen’s official birthday parade – that’s enough … he was retired to Whipsnade Zoo …

@ Jean – he’s an amazing looking animal isn’t he – the new one ... I think the drummer probably was mortified …

@ Steve – I know some can get feisty … they are incorrigible animals as you found out; oh dear .. I guess the best way to go: curry the difficult ones up!

@ Suzanne – it’s a fun story line isn’t it …

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan – they are royal looking aren’t they – they are a member of the goat-antelope family so from what I can see their horns are horns, rather than antlers …

@ Bazza – well we mostly know goat here for curry I suppose? Goats are making their way into our diet as another source of milk, and meat etc …

@ Lynn – glad William Windsor pleases you … they are a fun addition to military life …

@ Diane – not really – I just like writing up what I can …

@ Bob – well that’s one way of putting it – mighty unpleasant I’d have thought …

@ Denise – William II is just more docile I suspect – hence his rise into the ranks … and poor old William I’s demise to the zoo …

@ Chicky – yes – us Brits have a funny way of life … the breed comes from the Kashmir region and have spread into similar areas, and survive more as feral animals here – a few on the edges of the land …

@ Inger – I think #2 behaves impeccably – no entries in the popular press so far! They’ve become more popular here – from what I can see … but the kids (human) haven’t changed – lots around!

@ Betsy – yes that little pink tongue creeps out into the photo – they are fun … and as you say: he’s a goat …

@ Deborah – William II seems to have mastered all that’s required of him – a good image … well behaved, likeable … you could be right –but as William I is a good head butter I don’t think I’ll ask!!

@ Liz – well that must be ‘Stubbs’ an Alaskan mayoral cat … so good our major goat can be a major …

@ John – well that confirms it ... the origin of Welsh is Welch – thanks for that snippet from your grandmother and her name. As for deciding to be the Goat Major … they’d obviously rather stay feral on the edge of our Welsh land at Great Orme …

@ Lenny – oh brilliant to see you – it is a funny story isn’t it … that could have been true – but as the Drummer was selected for his playing skills … I suspect Billy I was the ‘bad one’.

Interesting to read about your mascot in the US Navy – no-one else has told us that … William Thirty-Three reigns … fascinating … loved this addition …

@ SENCO – thanks for visiting … I never watched Blue Peter – but am sure they’d have had Billy the mascot on – but a great additional fact … and as you say his tradition lives on into the 21st century … thanks so much for your comment – I’ll be catching up in the next couple of days …

Cheers to you all – so glad William II has impressed you all with his handsomeness! - Hilary

bookworm said...

I'm American and I didn't know anything about this. Love these kinds of traditions. The Unknown Journey Ahead agingontheblogspot.com

Sara C. Snider said...

I had no idea of the British tradition of having goats in the military. This has officially made my day. I love it!

A to Z 2017: Magical and Medicinal Herbs

Ann Bennett said...

Goats, such a stubborn animal. The military has so much tradition. According to family story, an ancestor served in the Scottish Black Watch. When called to defend the Queen, they did not immediately leave but stayed the night to either defend the Queen one more time or make sure it was done right. Far fetched recollection I know. But considering you have about 16,000 to 32,000 grandparents that far back, it's possible. haha. It sounds more storytelling that got taken as truth somewhere along the line.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Bookworm - we do have a lot of culture and thus traditions here that resonate through our British life ...

@ Sara - amazing what happens from a simple straying onto a battlefield in 1755!!

@ Ann -- good to see you ... yes they are stubborn creatures aren't they. interesting bit of family history you have their - interpreted whichever way the family wants. Genealogy is interesting isn't it ... thousands of grandparents ... no wonder I'm so mixed up!!!

Cheers to you three and all who read - have a happy Easter - Hilary

DeeDee said...

Aren't Kashmiri goats the ones that can walk up vertical on a hill :-)

Cynthia Rodrigues Manchekar said...

A goat in the military! How absolutely fascinating.

Heather M. Gardner said...

That is just awesome.
:)
Heather

Sharon M Himsl said...

Well now, goats in the military, and one that head-butted his way out of the military! Now that's funny. Learned something new today. Thanks!

Debbie D. said...

Thanks for this interesting history of the Kashmiri goat. I'm glad to know the current one is behaving himself. ☺

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ DeeDee - I'm sure they scrabble around the cliffs - having watched some of them (not sure what breed - but a mountain goat (obviously)) manage cliff sides that would make us feel distinctly odd to look down! So I'm sure these Kashmiri goats could do just that ...

@ Cynthia - yes ... it's one of those British stories that's true ...

@ Heather - it's certainly a fun piece of knowledge and the Goat always looks amazing smart when on parade ...

@ Sharon - I know the head-butting infringement is an interesting bit of knowledge - good to know William II is much more docile!

@ Debbie - yes as you say the current goat, William II, is behaving himself -

Cheers and thanks for commenting - William II has won us all over ... Hilary