Friday, 28 April 2017

X is for X War facts …



Both Wars in the 20th C decimated the nation’s stock of animals … which were used in all sorts of ways … transport, communications, logistics, vermin control and solace … then those found left on the land were often sacrificed for food …


English landscape: Cows on way to Milking

   the wide variety of breeds that were on our landscape in the 19th century were severely curtailed … as often only the weak were left in Britain.



Female glowworm - were
captured and used as lighting
in the trenches etc

Other fauna were pigeons, dogs, cats, camels and the unlikely glow-worm (emitted light acting as natural lanterns) … all had important War roles … these perhaps don’t fall into the Rare Breed category … but were so essential in many other ways.





The American Livestock Conservancy
The Rare Breed Survival Trust is redeeming our genetic bank of the wonderful variety of animals that have existed in Britain since the Ice Age split the country from Europe.



Animals in War Memorial Dispensary
- Bronze Friezes

Our Rare Breeds hold the key to our future … as we do not know which type of animal will be required to feed us, clothe us, transport us, comfort us, or communicate for us in the future …






A pack horse at the London War Memorial
for animals


War depleted our reserves … remember the Golden Guernsey Goat (under F – just to keep you on your toes!) … they would have become extinct being used for rations during WWII … if they had not been hidden in the caves.



Art work depicting the Native
Indians Seven Generations Rule
So the Rare Breeds Survival Trust has another feather in its cap … it is thinking forward – those 7 generations of stewardship … which forms part of the Iroquois mandate …


 … to make sure that every decision we take relates to the welfare and well-being of the seventh generation to come 


… what are we leaving them, it is necessary to think and not take …



That is X for X facts from War or Disease reminding us of our children’s future on this planet and our need to care for all things … from Aspects of British County Rare Breeds …


Counties with the letter X …
(note some Counties have been retired!, or amended over historical local government … but some I’ve included)
England: None
Northern Ireland: None
Scotland:  None
Wales:  None

Animals in War Memorial Dispensary outside north London (NW6) ... a place to check out ... 


This is the article where I found the Seven Generations Art Work ... "Intuition Decisions or Do you Make Conscious Decisions" 


Iriquois Constitution ... see here ...  


I will add a note in to my Reflections post re why we need to maintain as many varieties of animals, plants etc as we are able to ... and also give a note on why some animals have maintained particular 'articles' of their anatomy ... so please read my Reflections post up 'early' next week!


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

53 comments:

bazza said...

I thought this might be about x-chromosomes! But it's actually more interesting. Thinking seven generations ahead is remarkable. I once read that civilisation has reached its peak when old men plant trees knowing that they will never see the results.
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s concinnituous Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Elephant's Child said...

I love, love, love the idea of constructive forward thinking.
Yet more cheers for the Rare Breeds Survival Trust - positive thinking at its best.

Kim Blades said...

Another great post. I especially like the last sentence about educating our children on the importance of all living things to mankind. Have a fanastic Friday! Kim

Lynn said...

So glad they hid them in the caves!

Keith's Ramblings said...

Meat eating is in decline, so rescued and future breeds will probably have a different purpose from those of today and in the past.

Another day in Amble Bay!

DeeDee said...

Wars are bad, on humans and on animal breeds.
Nice take for X
Thanks for sharing :-)

Jz said...

It's funny - you know all about the carnage on the fields but you don't tend to think of the toll that war is taking on the animals back home... Thank you for reminding me of this.
(I'm ever-so intrigued by glowworm lanterns. I wonder if they were actual lighting, or more like reflectors, to delineate edges and stairs and such...)

L. Diane Wolfe said...

Thinking 7 generations ahead. I wish we'd apply that here.

It would be nice if less animals were needed for food.

Out on the prairie said...

Sad to hear the sacrifices. I was over at Ann Bennets and laughed seeing you had not read EB Whites children lit.A must to try.

Sue Bursztynski said...

Animals have been used and misused in wartime. Australian cavalry horses, Walers, were killed at the end of World War I because of quarantine issues that meant they couldn't be brought back and they didn't want to leave them behind to be mistreated. So horses that had served faithfully died. It must have been hard on their young riders to do that.

FinnBadger said...

Clever X. And a wealth of information as always.

Phillip | X is for Xanthophytes | And they’re on XL mail

Cynthia Rodrigues Manchekar said...

I never thought about the effect of the wars on the animals. This was an eye-opener.

Jean Davis said...

I did not know the glowworm was a real thing. I thought it was only a children's toy. Seeing it now, I can't say it's something I'd want to cuddle up with at night.
Discarded Darlings - Jean Davis, Speculative Fiction Writer, A to Z: Editing Fiction

Bob Scotney said...

During WWII rabbits, hares and pheasants became a vital part of our diet in a rural village. Hedgehogs, no endangered, were baked and eaten by the travelling community (guess I can't call them gypsies these days). Horses were still being used. My father looked after horses used in the army in WWI.

Emily Bloomquist said...

The 7 generation idea is wonderful, Hilary. Frequently, we hear about the next generation but not the seventh one. Perhaps there would be more forward thinking happening if it were discussed more commonly.

Emily | My Life In Ecuador | Xanthophobia, Xenoepist, Xyzlacatosis

Kristin said...

The poor pack horses - glad to see the memorial struggling up the stairs.

I wonder if the glow worm is related to the lightening bug. I think the lighteing bug is better looking :)
Finding Eliza

Andrea Ostapovitch said...

People often think that as long as they have enough money, that they and the next generations will be taken care of. How ridiculous! Even people with scads of money couldn't get certain things during or after the great wars. If it's not conserved, what good is money?
I did not know the fact about the glowworms in the trenches. Fascinating.
My husband and I often have conversations about how much we would love to see our country invest more money into long-lasting infrastructure and conservation of our animals, plants and land.
These posts have inspired me to look into what is being done here in Canada to see what I can get on board with.
Have a fantastic weekend,
Andrea

Jacqui Murray said...

People are so short-sighted, this is a difficult challenge. All those animals destroyed in a battle they had nothing to do with. Sigh.

Deborah Weber said...

Wonderful X post Hilary. The 7-generations and conscious decisions paradigms are so powerful. We have such a far way to go it seems to return to these fundamentally life-honoring ways, but it's hopeful to know that there are examples of their practice available to us study, to learn from, and to emulate.

C.D. Gallant-King said...

Talking about extinct and endangered animals reminded me of a story that came out in the last couple of days... about 130,000 year-old mammoth bones discovered in the Americas that show signs of being damaged by human-made tools. Which means humans crossed the world waaaaaaay earlier than we ever believed.

Sorry, unrelated, it just reminded me.

X - Brother XII, Canada's Own Crazy Cultist!

beste barki said...

War is such a destructive force. We must not leave each generation to learn about the ways of this world all over again but plan, construct and teach for the future.

Patsy said...

Some breeds which were once considered unprofitable, compared with those which could be fattened more quickly on concentrated, often imported and/or artificial feed are now starting to make a comeback. These tougher breeds are better suited to organic and sustainable farming methods.

Birgit said...

I'm so glad they hid the goats. I am really curious how the glow worm was used during war time.?? My mom is German and, after the war, when the Russians marched in, is when she said the real war started for her. The first 6 months were the worst since the Russians, at that time were made up of men given carte blanche to do what they wanted, rape, murder, pillage-the usual. They destroyed all the animals, gardens etc... they could find. My mom remembers the starvation and that cats were known as roof rabbits.

Shirley Corder said...

Fascinating post as always. So glad they hid the goats. The concept of seven generations related to animals is totally new to me. Of course, here in S.Africa we have so many endangered species, some having been declared extinct during my life time. So very sad. And mostly at the hand of man and his greed. Have a great weekend. Last two posts coming up! X is for the X factor as you Build a Better Blog. #AtoZchallenge.

Julie Flanders said...

I've been catching up on your posts and as always I love your theme! The Rare Breeds Trust sounds like such an amazing organization. Forward thinking doesn't happen enough in our world, it is inspiring to see this group actually doing it.

Nilanjana Bose said...

Love the artwork, and the seven generations rule! and applaud the RBT's thinking, seriously admirable. Great job on X!

DMS said...

Thank goodness for the Rare Breeds Survival Trust! We need more people thinking like that. An inspiration for sure!
~Jess

Liz A. said...

I can see how the wars would have been devastating for animal populations.

Rhodesia said...

Well done Hilary another wonderful post. Have a good weekend Diane

Nick Wilford said...

Great post. We don't know how we're going to rely on animals in the future.

Pamela Wright said...

Really fascinating and I love the London war memorial, it's one of my favourites. I also adore the Native American Indian sculpture that shows that we should consider the generations to come - thanks for sharing.

Courtney Turner said...

The most interesting thing I read here is that they captured glow worms to use as lighting in the trenches! https:// Maui Jungalow

bookworm said...

I live on what was once Iroquois tribal land. They had much wisdom. Few of our politicians even think of our children, never mind the 7th generation. So shortsided. The Unknown Journey Ahead agingonthespectrum.blogspot.com

Laurel Garver said...

Wow, that is a powerful mandate that the Iroquis have. Just imagine if something like that were enforced with corporations and wealthy executives whose mandate at the moment seems to be "how can I squeeze the most possible profits out of this venture right now, consequences be d@#%3d?"

Mike@Bit About Britain said...

Intriguing. You really have captured something with this series, Hilary. Thinking ahead? - most people have a problem with the very idea.

Claire Annette said...

You are so true about the effects of war on animals. These stories are really sad and should spur all of to try to preserve different breeds.

Joanne said...

so much to think about. I love this rare breed society that truly thinks about history and projects for the future. Brilliant thinking and planning. Oh, you've really brought some much to think about in your blog posts. April has been so full - thank you

Gail M Baugniet - Author said...

A remarkable thought that rare breeds hold the key to the future of mankind, who depends do much on animals but gives them so little of the credit.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Bazza – oh no … I aim to surprise. Thank you – delighted you think so … that seven generations ahead is as you say very thought provoking and so wise. Interesting about the men planting trees knowing that they will never see the results …

@ EC – it is fantastic isn’t it … I came across the concept from the Iroquois some years ago and have always remembered it … but the Rare Breeds Survival Trust is definitely full of positives …
@ Kim – thank you … somehow we need to get the parents of children to help them understand the importance of the future for their futures …

@ Lynn – I know the goat story is a lovely one isn’t it …

@ Keith – I hadn’t realised that … I know I’ve never eaten a lot of meat … but can quite see that the ancient breeds will have different characteristics that may well be required in the future …

@ DeeDee – wars are dreadful for the world – we need to live in harmony and respect all things …

@ Jz – and yes the carnage on the fields, the horror that is left for the weak to deal with back home … both human and animal …

… re the glow-worms … I’ll add that in to my Reflections post – so early next week …

@ Diane – I quite agree … I just wish we’d all set examples of thinking about the future, before we do anything … and help by eating less meat, or growing our own vegetables …

@ Steve – it is desperate to try to think what happened in the two major Wars … and what our parents and grandparents lived through.

I know I realise I’ve missed out on lots of reading- I really was extremely unacademic at school … somewhat strange now – but that was what my life was like – a lot of learning has been accomplished in the last 8+ years of blogging! Also I’m English and our curriculum or range of books was very different to those Americans would have studied …

@ Sue – yes the treatment to animals is difficult for us to understand – especially when so many had come from so far afield … then for the men to have to kill their beloved steeds so they weren’t mistreated seems a good thing, yet desperate to actually do …

@ Phillip – thank you … it’s a good way to add a little to the A-Z as I write them up …

@ Cynthia – it is ‘odd’ that we never seem to think around the whole picture isn’t it …

@ Jean – the glow-worm really was useful – I hadn’t realised how useful … but if you needed to read a map at night without letting your position be seen – the glow-worm was just the thing.

@ Bob – yes I haven’t gone into the wild-life as you and I would know it … as you say rabbits, hares, pheasants, hedgehogs were eaten to fill an empty stomach or two … and the horses not selected at first needed to be looked after – so true as too the other animals on the land …

@ Emily – thank you re the 7 generational thing – the indigenous tribes would do it naturally … but sadly people are greedy, or think we’ll wait til the next generation and start then … not very good for the earth …

@ Kristin – yes the memorials for WW1 animals are finally represented as permanent art works in the Wellington Arch ‘park’, by Apsley House – the Duke of Wellington’s home and now both are museums.

The glow worm and lightning bug are the same – just different nomenclature re the UK and America … and different stages of their life …

@ Andrea – I know … we do need to think about future generations wherever you are in life – an excellent comment. I’ll add a note re glow-worms into my Reflections post … and that’s good if these posts have inspired you to see where else you could help in Canada …

@ Jacqui – sadly that’s so true … if only we could stop being so selfish and think ahead. Animals in War don’t have any choice do they … nor do we, though …

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Deborah – thanks so much – some people seem to get it right, and the influence pervades … but never enough to spread into a family and generation thing … it seems these ideas are being spread here – which is good …

@ CD – I heard about those bones in San Diego… interesting … and the part I heard was querying how they got there …did they walk and from where … science is fascinating …

@ Beste – War is awful … and if only we can encourage each nation, each community to practise the 7 generations of stewardship … how much richer our world would be ..

@ Patsy – yes you’re right – the money (profit) aspect comes into it … as you say the older breeds have better characteristics for our future …

@ Birgit – yes it’s a good thing the goats were hidden. Appalling, really dreadful times – and those experiences your grandmother and so many other families were put through because of the War … destruction does not help anyone – and War is the worst … I have difficulty thinking about it …

@ Shirley – I’m glad I remembered about the 7 generations of stewardship … it really interested me when I first came across it – I’m sure the indigenous tribes of Africa would have done the same …

Having lived in South Africa, as you mention, I’ve read about and seen sometimes endangered species … modern man isn’t the best at looking after his world …

@ Julie - so good to see you – and delighted you like my theme. The Rare Breeds Trust is doing amazing work … and as you so rightly say forward thinking doesn’t come into our thought processes often enough … the RBST is inspirational.

@ Nila – I was glad to be able to put in the Artwork representing animals in War… reminders of all their many uses … the RBST is a truly admirable society …

@ Jess – yes the Rare Breeds Survival Trust is special … and let’s hope we can be inspired to help too …

@ Liz – the effects of War are always much worse than we can think about …

@ Diane – thank you …

@ Nick – our world is changing, as too our attitudes – let’s hope we can all work together …

@ Pam – thank you, I’m pleased I was able to fit in the War Memorials – the sculptures are exceptional … and thanks for noting the Native American Indian sculpture reaching out across the seven generations as they aspire to protect for the future …

@ Courtney – the glow-worm light was a necessity in the darkness of war time …

@ Bookworm – you must have been able to learn much by living on the Iroquios tribal land – they certainly had so much knowledge and wisdom. As you say so many in government don’t think to the future … we really need a few leaders who will take us forward for all our futures …

@ Laurel – yes the stewardship ‘mantra’ of the Iroquios brings a lot home doesn’t it … and you’re right if it could be built in/enforced via big business and the wealthy we’d all be better off --- enough is enough … profit that is …

@ Mike – thanks – delighted you’ve been enjoying it … oh yes thinking ahead is not commonplace is it …

@ Claire – it seems I’ve struck a chord here re the effects of War on animals … and I do hope we get spurred on to see how we can preserve our world each and every day …

@ Joanne – thank you so much … there is a lot to think about – and history gives us sometimes simpler views on the subjects … but then we can see what happens further ahead (as we look back) … I’ve learnt loads writing these up and having the comments …

@ Gail – so right … we don’t give any credit to the Rare Breeds or wild creatures … who actually provide so much for us to actually exist …

Thanks so much to you all – this series has given us lots to think about –which you’ve all added to … I’m really grateful to you for your comments and thoughts … cheers Hilary

Susan Scott said...

Such an interesting post Hilary thank you. Good on the Rare Breeds Survival Trust for their forward thinking. All kudos to them. May we all have a greater understanding and appreciation of these animals in time past that have shared our lives in so many wonderful and extraordinary ways.

Sara C. Snider said...

Fascinating about glow worms being used in the trenches. And I like the seventh generation rule. Sounds like good advice that I wish more would heed.

A to Z 2017: Magical and Medicinal Herbs

Suzanne Furness said...

We must do all we can to preserve our world and the animals in it for future generations. I knew that certain animals played their parts during the war but the glow worm was a new one on me. I hope you have enjoyed the A-Z this year, Hilary. Best wishes.

Jo said...

It is so heartening that there are people thinking ahead and endeavouring to conserve what we already have. What a pity all humankind cannot do this.

Michelle Wallace said...

Clever to use the female glowworm as lighting in the trenches.
The seventh generation rule is a forward-thinking strategy...humankind could take careful note and learn from it.

M. Denise C. said...

Such a good topic and post reminding us all that not only do we suffer due to war, but our animals do as well. Thanks, Hilary. Cheers, D

J Lenni Dorner said...

Wonderful post! So few people think about the impact war has on animals. Great work with this. And cheers for mentioning the Iroquois.

J -- Co-host of the #AtoZchallenge, Debut Author Interviewer, Reference and Speculative Fiction Writer
http://jlennidornerblog.what-are-they.com

Sharon M Himsl said...

We rarely think of the sacrifices animals suffer during war. Even the lowly glow worm! This would make a great children's book.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan - it is great that even as long ago as 40 years they were thinking ahead as an organisation. May we truly understand their importance to us and to life on earth, as too the importance of the earth and the rewards it brings us - we need to conserve them all ...

@ Sara - I hadn't really taken in the glowworm aspect as a 'reading mechanism' during war time, now I do ... While that 7 generation rule is something we could all adhere to ...

@ Suzanne - exactly we must look after our world - its flora and fauna for our future generations. The glowworm fascinated me ... yes thanks I had a good time during the A-Z ..

@ Jo - we are lucky that these Survival organisations Conservation societies etc are being and have been set up for the future ...

@ Michelle - there were a lot of clever ideas coming out of both wars and some remarkably awful ones. The 7 generation rule has been known about for a fair few centuries ... trouble is - we seem to be short-term thinkers and as a 'tribe' can't seem or don't want to alter our ways ...

@ Denise - many thanks - yes nothing much changed in that 100 years from Wellington to WW1, or WW1 to now (and in between WW2) ... suffering will go on if we hurt people ... as too anything else that gets in the way ...

@ JLenni - thanks for stopping by ...

@ Sharon - war seems to override our senses - it's not easy and then other things suffer. I know - even the lowly glowworm ... a book would highlight the various insects lives that we have in this world ... and teach the kids a think or two ...

Thanks so much for your comments and interest in the organisation - here's to the 7 generation idea ... cheers Hilary

Debbie D. said...

How fortuitous of them to think ahead for seven generations! Interesting insights once again. Thanks, Hilary (Sorry to be so far behind!).

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Debbie - no worries just always good to see friends ... the 7 generation thing is interesting isn't it and important ... cheers Hilary

DMS said...

I love the forward thinking. So important!!!!

Also- I had no idea that glow worms were captured and used in the trenches during war. Wow! :)
~Jess

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Jess ... as you so rightly confirm: forward thinking is essential for our future. Clever use of nature ... using the glow-worms to give light at night ... cheers Hilary