Friday, 30 August 2019

We are the World Blogfest # 28: Bird Song ...



Eighteen months ago for a #WAWTB post I wrote about nature allowing the Khasi peoples to ‘bridge the gap’ - where living tree roots are guided across ravines to form long lasting bridges …




… enabling them to ‘farm’ their lands for broom grass and other agrarian crops - even in times of monsoon rains, or when the hills are shrouded in cloud.



What I hadn’t realised, nor had I thought about (how often do we not think?!) … was how did they communicate as there are numerous gullies and raging rivulets in this mountainous region.


Khasi girls ... 

I’ve just come across the fact they call out to each other using short tunes that resemble birdsong, which act as a second name for each villager … being used more frequently than villagers “real” names.



This practice is called “jingrwai lawbei” which translates to “song of the clan’s first woman.”  They use it to communicate amongst themselves and with their neighbours …
Peacock Pheasant
(there are over 660 species
of birds in Meghalaya's forests)



… wouldn't it be lovely to hear their songs along with the native jungle birds found flitting from tree to tree – easily traversing those ravines, for which humans need tree roots.





These traditions developed by different tribes, as well as their cultures – all deserve to be recognised and preserved … not bespoilt by our so-called advanced nations …


Elephanta Falls spewing out of the
jungle growth


B U T … this is not so positive, as like other things that have happened in the world … modernity threatens … music from our world, mobile phones are now available, electricity came in as the new millennium clocked in, a road was cut through and made in 2003 …


… the villagers have realised they need to open the village up to the world – so they can preserve these two unique traditions: the living bridges over which their beautiful bird song calls …



The rapid approach of modernity in the Khasi hills reminded me of the ‘availability of coca-cola’ to the Eskimo peoples …


Out of darkness comes light

… which leads me to suggest and ask that we each pay more attention to our neighbours … as many will need assistance as the century progresses …





… and to think of those peoples on the fringes of our so-called modern society … the Amazonian Indians, the Inuit and other indigenous peoples, opponents of ruthless regimes …


Broom grass being laid out
in readiness for the making of brooms

… perhaps more importantly let’s take the middle line and use our powers of communication to gently spread more peace and understanding …




… I know I would like retaliation to be reined infor consideration and understanding to be our goals … so we can work together towards peace and harmony in today’s world and for its future.





We are the World – In Darkness Be Light

The Deccan Chronicle article on “jingrwai lawbei” – the Khasi peoples musical-birdsong names …

My earlier post on the Khasi’s Living Tree RootBridges




Write and Talk with peace in mind … without thought of conflict --- we here, as part of #WAWTB, can influence others, by setting examples … the butterfly effect will, over time, take hold …



Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

72 comments:

lostinimaginaryworlds.blogspot.com said...

Yes, Hilary, I do so agree with you, and given our human nature I think we shall take one step forward and then two back, as we always do. You reminded me of a travel programme - Simon Reeve's - who found a people who communicated by whistles from mountain to mountain. I despair when I see the fires in the Amazon and the devastation caused to the rain forest by primitive mining for gold.

Elephant's Child said...

Conservatively speaking I agree with you 100000 per cent.
I also suspect (strongly) our advanced nations could learn from many of the cultures we are overrunning.

Chatty Crone said...

My grandson being young is all for robot's and automation. What he doesn't realize I don't think - is 1)it will be taking his jobs and 2) he is missing the wonderful world of nature. sandie

Jo said...

Oh if only, Hilary. Unfortunately we are too much inclined to be competitive and want to be top dog wherever we are. World peace is still a wonderful dream.

Interesting about the bird song calls. I remember seeing those bridges on TV too, very clever.

Hels said...

Agreed re paying more attention to our neighbours!! In the olden days, we knew all our neighbours very well. But now we would be lucky to even know what they look like :(

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Carole Anne - we seem to stumble along don't we ... yet the human races keep going over time. Ah I didn't see the Simon Reeve programme ... but obviously humans are ingenious. We are living in difficult times with, in many cases, irrational leaders.

@ EC - thanks ... and yes I'm sure we could learn so much from our rural dwellers ... rather than deriding them: they manage to live in harmony with themselves and with nature ...

@ Sandie - your grandson has his eyes on gaining knowledge and from that he will be able to adapt to whichever way of life he wants to go in. He's done some travelling and his friends will take him out ... they'll appreciate their world around them ...

@ Jo - yes I know 'if only' ... still we can all be generous and thoughtful setting examples at grassroots level. After the millennium I rather thought we'd moved into a more peaceful existence ... but I fear I was wrong. I just hadn't thought about how they communicated across those deep gashes in the mountains as they worked their lands ... so the bird song names delighted me ...

@ Hels - Yes ... I remember when we knew our neighbours and looked out for each other ... thankfully here the educational charity I'm a member of seems to bring us all together much more ...

Thanks for visiting ... and here's to happy communicating - cheers Hilary

Mike@Bit About Britain said...

That was fascinating, Hilary. Obviously, we're a long way from world peace. And, true, we often don't know our neighbours. But by one measure, I think we make progress: gradually, life is being valued more.

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
Yes, yes, yes and yes again!!! &*> YAM xx

SpookyMrsGreen said...

Wow, thank you for sharing insight about other people in the world that I would never have heard of otherwise! I have mixed feelings about technology encroaching on tradition. While I love to remember our history and the way things used to be, I embrace modern technology for the way it opens up my small world. Perhaps the same could be said of these remote tribes?

David M. Gascoigne, said...

Good morning Hilary: The way that we have exterminated most of the indigenous peoples of the world, and then marginalized and discriminated against the others is one of the greatest stains in the sad history of Homo sapiens. And we continue to do it, don't we? When we see the awful conflagration in the Amazon, we think about the lungs of the world going up in smoke, which is bad enough, but who for a moment gives a thought to the people for whom it is home, whose entire social structure is wedded to it, their beliefs, the spirits of their ancestors. And those people really do know their neighbours. It always angers me when I hear of them being referred to as "simple" people. They are simple only by our twisted sense of what is simple - in so many ways they are smarter than we are. As others have pointed out we embrace the benefits of technology, but we have been raised in a technological society and its advances have been part of our lives from birth. Radical, life-theatening, societal-disrupting changes have not been thrust on us from without, threatening our very existence and our sense of self worth. It is too early in the morning to foment any more about this, Hilary, but thanks as always for making us think.

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

What a lovely post, Hilary! And I absolutely agree with your conclusions.

It's horrifying how "civilized" society has so cavalierly manipulated and destroyed so many groups of people in the name of progress. And sadly, I don't know if we've learned our lesson yet. We can only hope.

Joanne said...

such a considerate post. Indeed, opening up to the world can bring a lot of good, but so many troubles too. If only, we could just share the good bits and have peace and understanding. If only..
Have a good weekend

Damyanti said...

The Khasi culture is not well known even in India--where in the name of development, we are over-running all the indigenous lands for mining!

This is a beautiful story of these people, and I hope we as a species wake up soon, and stop visiting destruction on everything we touch.

Pradeep Nair said...

Hi Hilary - Very interesting to read about this unique way of communication among the Khasi people, who are the largest ethnic group in the east Indian state of Meghalaya.

Considering the communication revolution we are in, the musical language is a pointer to the extent of evolutions we have had.

I had missed your February 2018 post about the "living bridges". I just went back and read your earlier post as well. When I had gone on a family holiday to Meghalaya we had seen such "bridges". It was wonderful to hear stories from the natives of that region about their unique customs and traditions.

While it is true that as time goes by and newer ways of lifestyle emerge, it's important that we don't lose sight of the past, and we must do everything to preserve these unique traditions.

Thanks for sharing this post.

#WATWB
-- Pradeep | bpradeepnair.blogspot.com

Jacqui Murray said...

What perfect timing for this post, Hilary. I just started researching 'bird song' as a means of communication. In my latest book, Quest for Home, I have a character who communicates with bird song but I haven't developed it much and decided I wanted to. This is perfect!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Mike – I found this idea of bird-song language so emotive. Sadly yes the only peace we can enjoy is ensuring peace in our locality … we are making progress – it’s bringing in the ‘outriders’ – the indigenous peoples we really need to encourage and help more – not wipe out, or forget …

@ Yam – thank you … delighted with yes x 3!!!

@ Catherine – actually there’s a #WATWB by Norah Colvin about technology helping an indigenous tribe in Australia … it’s very, very interesting …

Because the locals are able to communicate more easily via their robot – there seems to be more engagement – both ways … looks to be really helpful … and the Khasi are recording these “jingrwai lawbei” which translates to “song of the clan’s first woman.” So there’ll be a record …

@ David – we are thoughtless aren’t we … all the peoples you mention … indigenous, marginalised, discriminated, bullied = the list goes on.

We know about them too – we have scientists letting us know about peoples hidden away – outside the boundaries of our lives, yet don’t acknowledge them … despite them having a wealth of knowledge we could do with …

They’re definitely not simple – just because they don’t have a western education … but getting people to think is difficult – I wonder about my own life and its unfortunate inability to have understood some of these things so late on …

I’m glad I’ve given you something to think about … makes writing the post worthwhile – and reading your remarks and the others … different perspectives … so necessary in this diverse world we live in and where we blog across boundaries …

@ Susan – thank you … we didn’t know – yet some did, why weren’t we told … and then encouraged to be empathetic to our other neighbours … we’re a right mix of peoples here in Britain …

The education and understanding we somehow need to find accepted by our societies … is just not encouraged amongst the indigenous tribes … we are learning more and I hope peace will come …

@ Joanne – sadly the opening up of the world didn’t really appreciate the complete exploitation of other lands and their peoples – and sadly people wanted to get power over people, things, land, etc …

@ Damyanti – the Khasi are becoming known I was quite encouraged with the article I read … and the realisation that their culture is precious … I hope it can remain so – they seem to have realised they need to come into the 21st century in the way they want to … without losing too much along the way.

Sadly power rules – destroying people and their lands … we see it everywhere … let’s hope sense can be brought to bear in future decades.

@ Pradeep – oh thank you for going over to my earlier post on their living root bridges … as well as here with their language in song.

How very interesting that you have visited Meghalaya – must be fabulous to be there. I’ve sort of picked up a little from searching beyond the Deccan article – my eyes get opened through these posts we put up. I won’t forget their use of bird-song …

I hope that what ‘we’ appear to be doing here … is realising how important their culture is … and recording it for posterity – while they are opening up a little …as they realise tourism is needed … to preserve their unique traditions …

@ Jacqui – I remember you mentioned bird-song as a way of early communication … especially for your research for your books … there’s a few notes here in the comments too …

Delighted my decision to post on “jingrwai lawbei” suits you down to the research ground!

Thanks so much to you all … there are some wonderful posts – which seem to tie in together this month … re language and cultures … the #WAWTB is a wonderful way to open up our hearts … cheers Hilary

Debbie D. said...

What a lovely way to communicate, via birdsong! Between that and the living bridges, this region sounds a bit like Shangri La. What a pity the modern world is intruding there, but on the other hand, there could also be advantages. As you said, improved communication could lead to better understanding.

This was a fascinating article, Hilary. Thanks for the education!

retirementreflections said...

Thank you for another very thought-provoking post, Hilary.
We truly can learn much from others -- especially the others that are too often dismissed.

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

A bloody good post

DMS said...

What a fascinating post. I had no idea about the "bird call communication" between villagers. I love it. I also think the living bridge is fabulous. :) I hope the modern world is respectful to both!
~Jess

Pr@Gun said...

wow such a lovely post, calling in bird song sounds so nice. I'm sure the place is full of natural harmony and melodies. I suppost preserving both the traditions and would love to see more towns following this to stay in harmony with nature.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Debbie - it just makes so much sense doesn't it ... the song will rise and travel to the fields - so supper can be announced. I think your Shangri La isn't here ... unless you enjoy the rains - lots of it! They, the Khasi, seem to have been advised that they need to bring in the new, while retaining their own culture - as best they can. One hopes life can be integrated ... but if we can record their way of life and sounds - before they vanish ... at least that will be there for future researchers ...

@ Donna - you must understand that better than many - after your years in Beijing teaching ... I imagine you have many stories that could be told.

@ Jo-Anne - thanks for that endorsement ...

@ DMS - both of these unique ways of adapting to life in the Khasi hills - the abode in the clouds - the bridges are extraordinary too - aren't they ... the Khasi for now seem to be adapting ... and like you, I hope they don't lose their culture.

@ Pr@gun - good to see you ... sorry I can't find your post to reply. I'm so glad you appreciated this and their way of life - and yes, it'd be good if we could get more local towns to take on board some of these ideas.

Good to see you all - thanks for coming by ... and enjoy the last weekend in Summer, as well as Labor Day over the pond - before the last quarter of the year arrives! Enjoy - cheers Hilary

Susan Scott said...

Bird song - and people's songs - sweetly singing in recognition and communication. How wonderful it would be if we took this message Hilary and sang and spoke sweetly. Lovely post thank you!

Shilpa Garg said...

This made for such a fascinating read! Communicating via bird songs and living bridges... how interesting!! Hope to visit this beautiful land someday. Thanks for sharing the story of Khasi tribe, Hilary!

D.G. Kaye said...

Fabulous post and insight here Hilary. I'm with you on everything. It's like the world is going backwards. It's defiitely time to help Mother Nature instead of help kill her. We have to remember kindness. <3

Malvika Vazalwar said...

Hi! I’m glad to have found your post. Here’s a petition to safeguard this unique whistled language: https://www.change.org/p/sangeet-natak-akademi-nominate-meghalaya-s-whistled-language-for-unesco-intangible-cultural-heritage Thank you!

Andrea Ostapovitch said...

Change it seems, is always inevitable. With it comes both the negative and positive. The loss of diverse culture is the saddest thing, but having easier access to the rest of the world is positive in many ways too.

M. Denise C. said...

Such an awesome post, Hilary, with a great message. Especially about watching out for each other as more and more people will need help. Thanks, Denise

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Susan - wouldn't it be amazing if we all spoke gently and softly to each other ... or just sang others' praises ... good to see you ...

@ Shilpa - I'm glad I linked the two posts together ... both such amazing ideas. I hope you can get into the Khasi hills and see these amazing people - delighted you enjoyed the post ...

@ Debby - another way of seeing our world ... even if it does appear to be going backwards - perhaps two steps forward and one back ... but we really need to help all of life, including our natural world - but kindness for our community and kindness in thought for all ...

@ Malvika - thankyou for coming over and clarifying where you found me ... especially as I don't do Twitter ... others obviously do! I've signed the petition to ensure UNESCO do what they can to maintain and keep the cultural traits of the Khasi people for the future ...

@ Andrea - change is inevitable, I agree ... and yes we really cannot lose all the diverse cultures of the world - they've all got something to offer - which we will need to find and remember ...

@ Denise - thank you ... the watching out for our local community seems to be more important in this day and age ...

Thanks so much to you ... perhaps you'll link across to Malvika's petition and sign it ... I've done it - take care - cheers Hilary

Keith's Ramblings said...

I love the way they communicated. So much better than texting although I suspect they are doing that now! With so much going on here currently and all the doom-mongering were are being subjected to, it's easy to forget that thing are far more difficult for others.

H.R. Sinclair, Southpaw said...

How wonderful it must have been to hear them calling to each other. I hope they are able to preserve that.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Keith - if there's a signal ... but mobile phones are being introduced. I just hope they can keep their traditions ... and as you say - with all the shenanigans here, it is so easy to forget other peoples existing in much more difficult circumstances ...

@ Holly - they are obviously endeavouring to maintain these traditions - and they are being recorded ... so let's hope they'll be preserved.

Thanks so much for your visits here - cheers Hilary

Peter Nena said...

Thank you for this post, Hilary. Indigenous peoples of the world understand their environments so well. They are the best conservationists, loving animals and trees alike. It is unfortunate what they are going through in this era when the hearts of men have become darkened by greed for excessive wealth in the form of oil and minerals. To burn a forest for me is equivalent to genocide, destroying ecosystems, altering the climate, and annihilating countless lives.
We can only hope that some of this exceptional beauty will remain and impact the rest of the world positively.

Sandra Cox said...

Both fascinating and beautiful.
I thought of Jacqui's trilogy as soon as I started reading this:)

Mark Koopmans said...

What an absolutely amazing experience it would be to hear the villagers communitcating across the divide, it gives me goosebumps just thinking about how powerful it must be!

And, of course, "we" come in and wreck everything with that little thing called progress... It's mind-boggling sometimes...

Thanks, Hilary, for doing your part to keep the awareness up and out there.

Madeleine Sara said...

Absolutely Hilary. How wonderful the idea of those special songs. What a shame that progress is killing off so much that is good about the past. xo

Mary J Melange said...

Hillary, thank you for this wonderful post for the August #WATWB. I would love to hear the bird songs, the musical communication between these people. It is something to preserve and serves as a reminder to be kind and welcoming to all people.

Liz A. said...

It's sad how our modern world encroaches on so many great traditions.

JoAnne Macco said...

Thank you for the inspiration to "gently spread more peace and understanding." I know this is the best way to be, and I can do it, but sometimes I forget. Singing helps.

Lynda Dietz said...

This sounds like such a beautiful place. I sometimes wonder if our introduction to modern things takes away more than it gives to societies such as these.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Peter – yes exactly they appreciate their own land and have lived in them for centuries and possibly longer … so what you’ve said in your excellent comment rings so true.

Yes – we can only hope that ‘we’ will realise the knowledge they hold and will be able to learn from them – and thus impact us all positively …

@ Sandra – like you I’d thought of Jacqui’s trilogy and we’ve been in touch …

@ Mark – wouldn’t it be amazing to actually be able to visit and to learn more about the Khasi. Sadly – we are like bulls in china shops … without a care in the world as to what we’re doing. I do hope now—a-days we are a little more aware of others … and can encourage our communities and friends to be more aware …

@ Madeleine – it’s good that we are learning about these communities … as they have so much to offer us. I’d love to hear their songs …

@ Mary – many thanks … just delighted this #WATWB post has been so well received … and like you I’d love to be there and experience their world and their calls across the rugged ravines …

Thank you … I wanted to remind us all that we need to preserve peoples’ cultures – even if they are so different to ours … they have much to offer, as we do too …

@ Liz – you’re so right our modern world tends not to think as it bulldozes through lives …

@ JoAnne – sadly we all forget at times … we are human – but it’s good we can realise and adjust … I know I’m better than I was – but still fail …

@ Lynda – I imagine it must be stunningly beautiful – but I know my legs wouldn’t cope with the terrain! You may be right (probably are) – but I was impressed here … it seems both societies (the Khasi and the modern world) are coming together through understanding … to preserve the lifestyle of the Khasi – yet giving them some of the opportunities to make life easier.

Their calls are being recorded and a film has been made …
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNLe8i39RP4

See above: My Name is Eeooow … official trailer Oinam Doren: Brahmaputra Valley Film Festival …

Thanks to you all for visiting … I’m delighted the Khasi calls have resonated into your hearts … cheers Hilary

mail4rosey said...

It is a beautiful sentiment and if everyone took heed, oh what a wonderful improvement it would be. We can only do our part, but even so, if everyone did their part in a considerate and responsible way, peace could overcome. :)

T. Powell Coltrin said...

I prefer living in peace, but not everyone wants that. I sure don't get it!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Rosey - wouldn't life be so much better for so many ... but as you say we can only do our part and be aware of others in much worse situations than our own.

@ Teresa - Power ... is terrible, but man can't seem not to want it - can't accept that we'd all live much more happily if we were peaceful and always appreciating others ...

Great to see the two of you - thanks for commenting - cheers Hilary

Patsy said...

Singing is a lovely way to communicate. I like to think people who do this are more likely to send happy, positive and/or loving messages, than to argue.

Lisa said...

I would love to hear these voices in birdsong. I went back and looked at your post about the root bridges too, and saw the video you'd given the link to. Amazing. Our world is so amazing, and so are the people who live WITH it, not abusing it.

Sandra Cox said...

Good morning, Hilary. Wouldn't that be an amazing place to visit and see a living bridge and hear a human bird song?
Cheers,

Chrys Fey said...

Thank you for telling us more about these people. I'd sure love to hear their song.

C. D. Gallant-King said...

We need progress, but at the same time wouldn't it be nice if people considered how their actions affect other people? Some would argue that asking permission would slow progress to a halt, but there is perhaps an argument to be made for slowing down anyway...

cleemckenzie said...

Yes, it's sad that with "progress" comes the loss of some of our most precious assets, like the melody of these songs. I'd rather hear those than the bing of my cell phone announcing I have a text. Thanks for the considered post today. I wish we had more advocates for the spreading of peace and understanding than we have for war and disruption.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Patsy - you're right about not being able to easily argue as they sing across the Khasi Hills ...

@ Lisa - thanks for commenting over on the root bridge post ... these two posts about the Khasi peoples are amazing - and like you I'd love to hear them. Yes we need to live peacefully, not abusing our world or its peoples ...

@ Sandra - nice to see - and wouldn't it be wonderful to see one of those bridges and hear human bird song ...

@ Chrys - I think we'd all love to hear their song ...

@ CD - yes ... we need to consider others ... I'm hoping the Khasi are embracing the modern world, while maintaining their own culture and standards ... something that wouldn't have happened 300 - 120 years ago ...

We could all slow down and pay attention to those living near us - making everyone's lives happier ...

@ Lee - I know 'progress' so often gets pushed through without too much thought about the unintended consequences or consultation with the peoples who'll be affected. You're right we need more advocates for spreading peace - the #WAWTB members and posts are doing what they can each month ...

Lovely to see you all ... thanks for visiting and commenting - cheers Hilary

Tyrean Martinson said...

Communication, especially in storytelling, can definitely help deepen our understanding of one another. However, we often have to be intentional and grace-filled towards each other.

diedre Knight said...

Hi Hilary!

You've provided such uniquely tranquil insight; natural bridges and human birdsong. It's disheartening to think it might all be threatened. I'd prefer the sound of birdsong over cell phone tones any day. Thank you for reminding us all how splendid peace can be ;-)

Empty Nest Insider said...

Hi Hilary - I also agree with you about the importance of “spreading peace and understanding.” There is so much needless destruction going on in the world. We all need to work harder to make the world a better place.

Julie

Lynda R Young said...

Change is not always for the best, but there are things we can do to help our neighbours.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Tyrean - you're right spreading knowledge through storytelling definitely helps us understand. Equally within our own familiar settings we can be so much kinder towards each other ... thanks for these points ...

@ Diedre - so pleased this is the way the post read ... and I was able to bring their story to #WAWTB readers. I'm hoping they'll be able to retain their way of life ... albeit the 21st century will offer other things - which one hopes they can and will benefit from - while we'll be able to learn from them ...

@ Julie - our world would be so much more tolerable for most peoples in the world if it was peaceful and we respected each other ...

@ Lynda - I know change isn't always for the best ... but it's going to happen but it can be done gently ... while we can definitely help others ...

Thanks so much everyone for visiting ... and we can respect each other and all ways of life ... cheers Hilary

Juliet said...

Lovely message Hilary. I really enjoyed reading about the bird song and you are so right about the importance of preserving and respecting this sacred way of living.

Kelly Hashway said...

Great message, Hilary!

Denise Covey said...

I love this Hilary. I've seen docos where native tribes communicate with bird noises but I don't think this was the one. Heart warming. Clever.

Victoria Marie Lees said...

Caring for our neighbor is a necessity for sure, Hilary. Thanks for reminding us. And I'd love to hear the songs along with the native jungle birds found flitting from tree to tree. Your words are beautiful. Thank you!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Juliet - we just need to preserve everyone's culture and traditions ... melding into our modern ways, without destroying their way of life ... it seems to be working here ...

@ Kelly - thanks ... good to see you ...

@ Denise - I gather there have been programmes about their way of life ... someone mentioned South America - I imagine in mountainous jungle lands they would utilise nature to its full ... and early man - did he use bird song calls as his way of communicating? Interesting thought ...

@ Victoria Marie - yes we need to do what we can for others. There are some videos of the Khasi peoples calling ... it must be amazing to be in jungle listening to their calls - especially with the native chirping birds and chattering beasts as the background accompaniment ...

We do live in an amazing world ... lovely to see you all - and so glad to know you appreciated the Khasi's way of life ... cheers Hilary

Vallypee said...

Oh Hilary, I hope we tread gently there too. It is wonderful to read about these traditions and what a special communicative ability they have! I hope it survives the onslaught of modernity.

A Cuban In London said...

Wow, this is such a rich post in so many ways. Thanks.

Greetings from London.

Nick Wilford said...

What a beautiful idea to use birdsong to communicate. I think it's really important to preserve these traditions especially for remote tribes. Globalisation has a lot of benefits but if things become too homogenous we will lose a lot of beauty from the world.

sonia a. mascaro said...

Hello Hilary,

Thanks for your nice comment about my husband Old Cars.
Sorry my delay to visit you.

Yes, they are good memories but I miss so much every thing he loved...

Just important post you did.

Sending lots of Hugs and much Love too!

Theresa Milstein said...

Hilary, this is a really lovely post. What we lose when don't pay attention to how inventions and politics change people and places.

Haddock said...

Love those Khasi girls.

Michael Di Gesu said...

Hi Hilary,

I couldn't agree with you more! We should use our power of communication to spread peace and understanding instead of venom and discord.

What a lovely way to communicate~ I'm sure the melodies are quite beautiful!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Val - thank you ... I certainly hope so - it's been really interesting reading other #WATWB posts ... that tie in to this post. I just hope we can blend our western world with the amazing culture and traditions that are part of our world and its peoples ... let's hope we can work together ...

@ ACIL - thanks ... it's been really interesting and informative looking into this and other ways of communicating ...

@ Nick - I think probably it occurred naturally in our human evolution - but it makes so much sense across those gullies and ravines. You're right about globalisation and its benefits - but I quite agree re too much homogeneity: we can lose so much ...

@ Sonia - good to see you and thank you for your comment. Yes - I hope the post impacts on readers ...

@ Theresa - it's so true isn't it ... I find the #WATWB posts fascinating to read ... and we do need to be cognisant of all things in our world ...

@ Haddock - lovely to see you ... I imagine the Khasi peoples have so much to offer the world, which we don't lose ...

Thanks to you all for your comments - there's so much to learn from these type of posts ...cheers Hilary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Michael - apologies I missed your comment ... you're right we need to spread peace and understanding in the world. I'm sure their songs and calling must be beautiful to hear. Cheers Hilary

Indywrites said...

Yes, I have also read about their birdsong and the bridges. In fact, I missed seeing one when I had visited the state a few years ago. I agree such traditions must be preserved and supported.
Lovely idea of sharing awareness and shedding light.
Thanks, Hillary.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Indy - pity about you missing out on seeing the bridges and probably hearing their songs. I agree I hope these traditions and cultures are preserved.

Thanks - glad you appreciate Damyanti's and Belinda's idea of this bloghopfest post - it's wonderful isn't it - that we can share positivity ... cheers Hilary