Wednesday, 21 August 2019

Write … Edit … Publish … Bloghop: Red Wheelbarrow ...




The weather was calm, the sun shone brightly as the evening started to draw in … the three siblings had finished sorting the old family home out … and were having one last evening together reminiscing about their childhood …





Their mother had died a while ago, but had made sure they’d all look after their father til his time was up … he had been a frail figure …





… usually dressed in a large shirt, a moth-eaten jumper, his trousers held up with fraying string, keys dangling from his right pocket’s belt loop, or tucked inside … and, when the sun was out, with an ancient floppy hat perched on his head …



He’d spent his last years wandering the garden tidying, pruning, happy to have one of his children over to mow the lawns …





… the property had been sold and in another week the new owners would take over, but for now – they’d made their plans … a quiet evening with a game of monopoly out on the veranda as the sun went down.


All had worked out peacefully … their parents had been at home to their last … so that the only thing left to do was a final tidy up before they closed the door on the family home …


Lasagne

They’d all brought something for the evening … the daughter had made one of the family’s favourite dishes – lasagne … rich, full of tasty mince, covered with a delicious cheesy sauce … served with herby bread, then …






Herby bread

… all fresh ingredients from their gardens made the salad – lettuce, tomatoes, radishes, cucumber, baby carrots … baked potatoes were in the oven …




Blackberry sprig ...

… they’d had one last walk round the garden picking blackberries for dessert – Cornish cream had been brought … there was cheese: Cornish Yarg and Cornish Brie to nibble as the sun finally set on them and their life at this house …



There was red and white wine … to enjoy pre-supper and after as that golden orb let the cool air start to chill them down as night set in.


Monopoly board

Then over the evening they had decided to have one last game of monopoly … as children with their parents they’d all enjoyed this sort of evening – so it was felt that one final turn with the familial set would be just the right closure for them and the house.




An American token
wheelbarrow
The board was out … they talked about why the little red wheelbarrow was amongst the tokens … the original galvanised one had cracked and broken … then their father felt it would be better to have one that wouldn’t cut their hands if they fell as they were fighting over some trivial consequence …


… he’d gone off to his workshop … and come back with a wooden wheelbarrow, painted red … it stood out on the board, so was our most favoured token … as children we’d had to take turns.


The early evening was drawing to a close … we drew up our chairs, relaxed with the wine, chatted in familiar tones, set the monopoly board out … and decided there’d be four players … the three of us and, using the little red wheelbarrow, we’d surrogate for our parents by playing a fourth token ... reminding us of those early years as the family grew.



Roses in garden with white five bar gate ...


Supper was got ready … the play continued … the tokens we used were the thimble, the boot and the top hat … 






... we went to Jail, took our Community Chest or Chance cards, purchased our London properties … got cross with the penalties we needed to cough up to the banker … our parent’s little red wheelbarrow was bringing them luck as the banker …


Cornish Yarg covered with nettle leaves
… we laughed, nattered, ate and whiled our evening away as we enjoyed the views down the garden … the rose beds, across the lawn past the huge cedar tree, over the ramshackle tennis court, where we’d found the blackberries in the hedgerows …






We were all happily settled with our own families – but we would miss the memories of our times here in our childhood home … our oldest brother would, for his children, inherit the Monopoly set.




A new chapter was about to begin for the little Red Wheelbarrow …

Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

77 comments:

lostinimaginaryworlds.blogspot.com said...

What a clever idea, and I loved the story telling style, making want to read more 🌹

Fil said...

Lovely story Hilary and I loved the change from they to we ...nice touch, and very moving.. I wouldn't have wanted to leave that place x

Debbie D. said...

What a lovely story, Hilary, and beautifully written! At first, I thought it was fiction, but then you switched from "they" to "we". Is it a memoir? In any case, it's a perfect "end of an era" tale with a "feel good" vibe.

John Holton said...

This was a very sweet story. It captured the mood and spirit of closing out a family homestead perfectly. And I hope nothing ever happens to the Red Wheelbarrow...

Jo said...

Peaceful little story Hilary, enjoyed it. I haven't played Monopoly in years noe have I heard of Cornish Yarg before. Sounds interesting. Pity to lose a home likd that though.

Ann Bennett said...

Pleasant evening, pleasant way to say goodbye. Lovely story.

Anabel Marsh said...

Lovely story! I must admit, I was on the due of my seat expecting something bad to happen - so glad it didn’t.

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
What a delight! Of course, my thoughts immediately jumped to the famous poem... but this little reminiscence has given me another red wheelbarrow to remember! YAM xx

Elephant's Child said...

Awww.
My sentimental self LOVED this. I would envy whoever kept the red wheelbarrow laden with memories... And am sure it trundled through everyone's heart.

Elephant's Child said...

A truly inspired take on the prompt.

Joanne said...

Absolutely delightful. I really like this spin on the red wheelbarrow tales I've been reading. Pat Hatt took quite a turn in his.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

I really like the sentiment, the old passing to the new.

Starting Over, Accepting Changes - Maybe said...

That is such a good story about a family who did the right thing for their parents and each other.

retirementreflections said...

An absolutely beautiful story that has been beautifully written. Thank you for sharing this with us!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Carole Anne – thank you … just reminiscences in amongst the fiction … thanks for the support …

@ Fil – I didn’t intend that … it was meant to be ‘they’ … but equally could be ‘we’ … homes are full of heart and ours was …

@ Debbie – thank you so much. It is fiction with some of the descriptive parts that could be a sort of memoir. It’d be lovely if we could all end such chapters of our lives like this …

@ John – so pleased you enjoyed the homely tale. The little Red Wheelbarrow is fiction … but I could imagine it happening …

@ Jo – so pleased it felt peaceful. I haven’t played monopoly either for years … but think about it occasionally. Cornish Yarg I have written about … a ‘newish’ artisan cheese – it’s delicious! Yes it was a sad home to lose … but life goes on …

@ Ann – thanks so much – lovely to see you here …

@ Anabel – gosh … did the story bring that sort of emotion out – no it couldn’t be ‘nasty’ … too many happy memories – but I guess there could have been blood all over the wheelbarrow … ?

@ Yam – I only found out about the famous Red Wheelbarrow poem when I had a look around … so it was difficult to get away from it. But I mulled over an idea or two and in the end Monopoly having a wheelbarrow as a token gave me an opportunity to develop a gentle story …

@ EC – thank you … it was lovely to write, but sadly just was made up. Still things rumbled through me til this little tale prevailed … some truth fictionalised to bring the story to fruition …

@ EC – thank you – I was so glad there was a wheelbarrow in the token set!

@ Joanne – thank you … I’m going to be doing the rounds today – I’ll check in on Pat’s …

@ Alex – thanks … it was gentle to write up blending bits and pieces of extended family life together …

@ Arleen – yes one doesn’t always get the chance … and here was a perfect opportunity to put the idea across that we need to pull together to help our elderlies and ourselves … thank you.

@ Donna – thanks … it’s a collation of things that could have been with the setting there to be told …

Thanks so much to you all – just so happy you enjoyed the little story – not exactly true … but set in familiar settings … cheers Hilary

Keith's Ramblings said...

What a delightful tale Hilary - I felt I was there looking on!

Hels said...

Saying goodbye to our parents, especially in the parental home, is the toughest thing for the adult children. My mum was 90, and in sparkling good mental and physical health. But dad was 91, and physically very weak. So we had a big dinner for mum's 90th birthday party, and everyone made a warm speech speech full of memories.

The professional photographer did a great job, and when my parents both passed away, I was very grateful for his beautiful images.

Jacqui Murray said...

That was delightful. I liked everything about the old couple, their kids, their memories.

Deborah Barker said...

Lovely tale and beautifully told Hilary :-) X

Mark Koopmans said...

What a *wonderful, wonderful* way for the siblings of a loving family to spend the last evening at the house they'd grown up in.

And I absolutely loved this line: "...as the sun finally set on them and their life at this house."

Well done, Hilary. Loved your story!

Friko said...

A lovely story, beautifully imagined and nicely written, it could be true, no doubt about that.

Lynda Dietz said...

Aww, that was sweet! And exactly as practical as a father would have been, making sure there were no sharp edges for the inevitable squabble.

D.G. Kaye said...

What a beautiful and heartwarming memory Hilary. Some things never fade. :) x

Dan said...

This is a wonderful story, Hilary. You drew me in pretty quickly, and I found I couldn't let go.

Erica/Erika said...

Hi Hilary, I had attempted to comment on your blog months ago, and it did not work. I have recently learned that I can access blogspot if I use Firefox instead of Safari. I am constantly learning things around here:)

I haven’t heard the phrase “his time was up” in a long time. Beautiful descriptions, Hilary. I feel as if I am there with you. A mixture of sad/happy/poignant. Beautifully written:) Erica

Denise Covey said...

Hilary, absolutely beautifully told. You took us right there into the lives of the bereaved children. What an inspired idea to use the Monopoly token as the red wheelbarrow. Loved it. Thanks for posting for WEP. I added your link to the list so people know you're up!

Dreaming said...

Your pictures set me up to expect a story about the old wheelbarrow... the full size one. I love the twist and the surprise of having the Monopoly piece as the wheelbarrow!

Kalpana said...

This was such a delightful read and a very sweet take on the prompt. I enjoyed it thoroughly.

Rebecca M. Douglass said...

A sweet story, and as usual some nice use of the photos mixed with the text. And a trip down memory lane, as I remember the Monopoly games (not always fondly) I played with my brothers. I had completely forgotten about the wheelbarrow among the tokens.

Pearson Report said...

What a beautiful tale down memory lane, Hilary.

The photos were an added bonus to your already delightful words - so visual. In fact, I think my imagination was able to conjure up the smell of the tasty lasagna dish, enjoyed by the family, I felt I was there.

I smiled over the Monopoly tokens, we too had ones my father made, but alas, not a little red wheelbarrow.

Sending smiles your way, Jenny

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Keith – many thanks … that’s great to know you were able to feel you were there too …

@ Hels – it sounds like your family organised your parents farewell brilliantly … mine wasn’t like that – but these thoughts express that this is the way I’d have liked it to be … in our last family home … but not to be for us. I’m so pleased you had your professional images … it does make a difference …

@ Jacqui – many thanks … my uncle to a ‘T’! the descriptive rest some remembrances as well as the concept …

@ Deborah – much appreciated – if only it could have been like that … but life is as is …

@ Mark – great to see you … and to read you appreciated the ‘bones’ of the story … the setting is mostly true – the rest sort of fudged! We’d be lucky if things turned out this way …

@ Friko – thank you … yes I felt it could be true … and took me back ‘a few years’ …

@ Lynda – yes, I could imagine my father going off and mocking something up quickly in his workshop … exactly – no doubt a squabble would have ensued …

@ Debby – thank you … not quite true, but some parts never fade and could have been so …

@ Dan – many thanks … as I’d intended the evening to wrap itself up!

@ Erica – I remember you tried to comment a while ago … when I started Blogger was changing and that made life very difficult for a while … I’ve never understood the browser element – I just use Chrome – but as you say … it’s being prepared to work things out and adapt if necessary … thanks for being here!

Our English phrases seem always to come to my mind … while I’m so glad you enjoyed the tale … yes sad and poignant, as well as happy memories.

@ Denise – it was luck … there was a wheelbarrow token – American, I think … but useful to me! I wanted to do something a little different … Thanks for adding my link – I was in London yesterday … and would have done it this a.m. – so thank you for pre-empting me …

@ Cyndi – excellent to see you’ve joined us in the WEP. Oddly I was going to write about the old rusty wheelbarrow … but I wanted to do something different – so when I found the wheelbarrow token – that nailed it! So pleased you enjoyed the twist …

@ Kalpana – appreciate your thoughts … a gentle tale …

@ Rebecca – I enjoy the visual … it seems to bring the text alive. We played Monopoly quite often for a couple of years … before moving on – but they were fun times … until the squabbles started – so appreciate your ‘not always fondly’ phrase. The wheelbarrow was poetic licence – there was one in the American set …

@ Jenny – good to see you … and I can’t seem to write without adding visuals for me and you! It’s the herby bread’s aroma I smell! But that sort of meal is perfect …

I think most of us probably had a monopoly set – but the wheelbarrow (I think) was for the American version … just I adapted it for my take on the prompt …

Thanks everyone – so lovely to see you – we’re into a bank holiday weekend (3 days) … and it appears that it’s going to be hot down here … so I’m looking forward to being out and about – and catching up on all the WEP entries – see you soon, cheers Hilary

Unknown said...

Hilary, in your excellent August 2016 item on Pevensey …
http://positiveletters.blogspot.com/2016/08/st-nicolas-church-pevensey-and-william.html
… please could you tell me the source of the marvellous second figure, a map, 'The coastline of Pevensey c 340 AD'? I'd love to read the small-print on the map, but I'd need a higher-resolution image.
Please reply to rogerhiggs@hotmail.com
Many thanks and best wishes,
Roger
Dr Roger Higgs, geologist, UK (Victoria BC from 1987-90!)

Sally said...

Beautifully written and the use of the supper and game of Monopoly certainly evoked some family memories for me as well.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Roger - good to meet you ... I've replied separately - as I did manage to find a copy of the map that enlarges ...

@ Sally - thanks so much ... I thought the story-line-tale would bring memories to light ... so I'm delighted it did for you ...

Cheers to you both - Hilary

Jemi Fraser said...

Love your take on the prompt. Home. The best place on earth.
Just lovely!

Olga Godim said...

Wonderful and warm story. And a monopoly token red wheelbarrow - how original.

bookworm said...

Tears in my eyes towards the end...we had to move my mother in law up here in 2015 and sell the house that my husband and his three sibs had grown up in and she had lived in for over 50 years. It's about 150 of our miles away. We went back earlier this year as we are still friends with her old next door neighbor and saw the house had been totally changed outside and the neighbor said it had been gutted and remodeled inside, too. It was bittersweet...I feel this story. Well done, Hillary. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

Pat Hatt said...

A great way to work in the red wheelbarrow. So many things change with properties but such memories never will. Good the monopoly game didn't go on forever as some do haha

L.G. Keltner said...

This was both sad and sweet. They'll never be able to play Monopoly with their parents again, but there will still be family game nights in store for that little wheelbarrow. I love your take on the prompt!

Madeleine Maddocks said...

Sweet story. My favourite was always the Scottie dog. wheelbarrow sounds a good one.

dolorah said...

What good memories. I loved our family nights with board games. Its a shame so few families do this anymore. Loved the sentimental vibes here. Glad the children were not devastated by the loss of parents.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Jemi - many thanks ... I enjoyed crafting the little story composed of a few memories ... Home - yes the best ...

@ Olga - thanks so much ... I wanted to do something a little different ...

@ Alana - wonderful to see you. Our life didn't happen this way ... but could so easily -it was a happy home. It's always difficult going back to see old homes - I know my changes to our home would have been different to my parents' choices ... bittersweet, as you so rightly describe. I can imagine you and your husband's challenges bringing your MIL up to be with you or near you ... so desperate for her.

@ Pat - I thought about the length monopoly games can take ... but chose to 'forget' that thought for the storyline. Getting the father to 'turn' a little wheelbarrow in his workshop seemed an opportunity within the story. So pleased you enjoyed it ...

@ LG - many thanks ... and so many of us change direction once we leave home - our spouses not enjoying the same things we do ... but the memories are always there ...

@ Madeleine - great to see you ... I'd forgotten about the Scottie ... in fact I couldn't remember the tokens ... so was rather pleased when a wheelbarrow turned up in the American version - that I could co-opt for my story!

@ Donna - yes I too remember many holidays playing games with the family ... I know a few who get their board games out - but as you say it's not as common as it once was. I think when parents get aged, and one passes ... the grieving sets slowly in ... so the devastation is a part of life isn't it. Nostalgia, joy and sadness are here ...

Thanks so much to you all - so many interesting little stories come out of these prompts ... cheers Hilary

bazza said...

Aah... nostalgia. It's not what it used to be.
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s oddly overdone Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

Your story really touched my heart, Hilary. You described the father beautifully, and allowed us to "see" him. Although I'm not a fan of Monopoly, the idea of the siblings playing together and of that red wheelbarrow token brought tears to my eyes. Well done, dear lady! Cheers1

Bernadette said...

Such a beautiful piece! Truly brings out the nostalgia.

PS: The starting bit made me hungry.

The Real Cie said...

A beautiful, bittersweet story.
I am nearly the older generation in my family at this point. We are a dying line. I had one child, my brother had no children. My son, who is now 29, likely will not have children.
Strange to think of these things.

Roland Clarke said...

Moving way to remember departed parents - with love, food, drink and monopoly. The 'red wheelbarrow' was cleverly used, adding to the wonderful feel. (I've eaten Cornish Yummy Yarg.) Rich memories and a bright red future. Real in part, it seems.

Cindi Summerlin said...

what a touching story and such good memories the children had of their parents. is it a true story, or based on actual events?

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Bazza – it probably isn’t is it … but for us oldies it’s still there …

@ Susan – the father figure was based on my uncle … and yes I know monopoly can linger on … but as adults we could curtail our time playing … the red wheelbarrow could so easily have happened within our family. So glad you enjoyed it …

@ Bernadette – it’s good to know the food gave that extra ambience to the story … I’m happy you enjoyed it …

@ Cyndi – many thanks … we are a dying line – but cousins are around. I know I don’t feel like the older generation ... but that’s the way it is. As I keep remembering small parts of my life it’s fun incorporating them into various posts or bloghops …

@ Roland – thank you … it was fun to write up – and I was so pleased to find a wheelbarrow in the American monopoly set that I could draft in as a wooden replacement. Isn’t Cornish Yarg yummy … love it. Certainly real in part … and it’d be fun to have a red wheelbarrow token to carry forward for future generations …

@ Cindi – it’s a mix … the father figure is a based on my uncle, whom I also looked after … and the gardens sort of tie in, the food definitely does … the veranda was there … the workshop was around – and the paternal line were all excellent woodworkers … so much could be created … once the red wheelbarrow had come to my mind …

Thanks so much to you all for visiting … so pleased these memories appeared real … cheers from a hot England on the bank holiday Monday … cheers Hilary

Pat Garcia said...

Hi,

Yes, indeed, a new chapter of memories would begin with the red wheelbarrow and when the brother's children have children of heir own, the red wheelbarrow would be past down to another generation. I enjoyed reading your story. It speaks loudly of passing something precious down through the generations.

Shalom aleichem,
Pat G

Sandra Cox said...

What a creative, lovely story, Hilary.

cleemckenzie said...

This nostalgic piece brought tears, Hilary. I was right there with the grown-up children, saying goodbye to their childhood home. A wonderful contribution to the August WEP.

diedre Knight said...

Oh, Hilary! the only way to improve on this precious story would be to hear you read it out loud. In fact, I had been reading it aloud, myself until I got this pesky lump in my throat. Absolutely beautiful!

troutbirder said...

How sweet. I remember similar evening with out two boy. Now both gone and there Mother soon to follow. Bitter sweet that.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Pat - yes ... their son reminding his children how and where the little red wheelbarrow came about ... and hopefully onwards down the family line. It's the sort of thing I'd love to be real ... but it's wonderful people do treasure their family's special possessions ... however small.

@ Sandra - many thanks ... I enjoyed writing it.

@ Lee - sadly life doesn't always turn out that way ... and it's fortunate for those few where both parents survive happily together until their denouement, and ultimately the decisions taken re the property - personal and actual. I'd have loved this to have been our family life ... still it's a good thought ...

@ Diedre - yes ... I'd love to put some of these posts into audio - it's a project ... thanks so much for a lovely compliment ... I just wish it was exactly true - sadly not so ...

@ Ray - yes for you ... this is too close ... and I'm pleased you have those happy memories - which perhaps this little post brought thoughts back ...

Thanks so much to you all ... these stories can bring out those bittersweet memories so many of you have mentioned ... cheers Hilary

mail4rosey said...

What a sweet story of this close-knit family. I love the way you brought the wheelbarrow in, and of course it would be the most favored token, for many reasons at different times. :)

Toi Thomas said...

What a sweet story of love, loss, family, and acceptance. I can't imagine having a wonderful place like that to have to say goodbye to, but these grown children do an excellent job. They are such a well-adjusted family with lovely traditions and sweet a legacy to pass on. Nicely done. Thank you for sharing something so personal.

Liz A. said...

That little red wheelbarrow would be quite the keepsake.

Beth Camp said...

Thank you for sharing this charming story of a family that gathered to say goodbye to more than their parents -- but ended up celebrating good lives and making memories as well.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Rosey - thanks - I have to say I was quite pleased at being able to bring the red wheelbarrow in, in the way that I did ... made it fun to write ...

@ Toi - I'd have loved to have carried on living at our family home ... but life takes different turns. Albeit it's not completely true, some aspects are ... and other family members treasure their 'heirlooms' ....

@ Liz - yes it would be quite the keepsake wouldn't it ...

@ Beth - thanks ... I was pleased with the story line and the ambience created, reminding me of a few things ...

Lovely to see you all ... we're in muggy heat - but the cooler air is on its way ... cheers Hilary

Christopher Scott Author said...

A charming tale with a fantastic atmosphere of a family gathering. Well done.

Nilanjana Bose said...

This was delightful! and it so struck a chord with me, because I remember games of Monopoly as a kid with my family, though I did not have a red wheelbarrow among the tokens :) Cool take on the prompt - so original, Hilary! Thanks for sharing this at WEP.

Marja said...

Wow what an amazing story I got pulled in completely and soaked in the atmosphere and got hungry by the description of the fine food. Fantastic story telling Hilary

Edix said...

Amazing where ideas come from , isn’t it? This is a good one.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Christopher - many thanks ... no guile here, just the little red wheelbarrow! Family time ...

@ Nila - I don't think our parents ever played with the three of us ... our involvement with the game, meant they could get on with other things! We didn't have a red wheelbarrow as a token either ... but it was fun to concoct the story ...

@ Marja - Thanks so much ... it was an easy write as to a point it was very real ... especially the food! Delighted you enjoyed it ...

@ Edix - good to meet you here ... and yes the creative brain can have its moments ...

Lovely to see you all ... we're almost at the last of summer here - the temperatures have dropped off, but still reasonably warm ... and we have had a little rain - no storms yet ... cheers Hilary

Elsie Amata said...

I could feel the love emanating throughout the post. Reminded me of when we had to close the doors on my childhood home. Well done, Hilary!

Elsie

Nick Wilford said...

A very sweet story that sums up the ending of an era. Well done!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Elsie - many thanks ... it was an easy write - but always sad to leave beloved homes ...

@ Nick - good to see you here ... and glad the ambience came across -

Cheers to you both - and thanks for your visits - Hilary

Truedessa said...

Hilary,

This was delightful to read with vivid imagery of the family playing a favorite board game. I remember those games lasting for a very long time. I also, loved how you incorporated the photos.

Cheers!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Truedessa - yes sometimes Monopoly can run on ... but it can be 'restrained'. So pleased you enjoyed the post with its accompanying images - it could so easily have been ... cheers Hilary

DMS said...

What a scene you created. I could so easily picture it all and could imagine how the siblings felt. Lovely writing!
~Jess

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Jess - thanks so much ... appreciate the comment coming from you - it did remind me of home (to a point!), but am always glad to know the storyline takes you along with it ... cheers Hilary

Anstice Brown said...

What a unique take on the prompt! I love the idea of the grown-up children getting together to give their family home a send-off and to remember their parents. And now that red wheelbarrow is being passed to the next generation. So sweet!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Anstice - thanks so much ... it was a gentle story to write up ... bringing back some memories of time gone by - but not exactly as life panned out. It'd be a lovely way to leave the family home ... but dreams that didn't happen. Cheers Hilary

Juliet said...

What a beautiful story, Hilary. It's great to see you getting into creative writing. I love the way you bring in the red wheel-barrow. It's just the kind of thing my Dad would have done, a piece of loving crafting.

Julie Flanders said...

Oh my gosh what a beautiful story! It gave me chills to read. So touching. My mom is my only parent left alive and she still lives in my childhood home, so this went right to my heart.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Juliet - many thanks ... I've sort of pushed myself in that direction .. by joining in the Write Edit Publish blog hop ... so I'll continue as best I can with learning to write creatively. Yes - I can think of a few of my family - who would happily spend time wood-working in their workshops ... my father's sister included!

So pleased I brought memories back of your father and his skills ...

@ Julie - so pleased to read you enjoyed the story ... especially as your own home is nearly in this situation ... my thoughts to you all as you spend time with your mother in her later years ...

Thanks so much to you both - cheers Hilary