Sunday, 16 February 2020

Birthday feedback … part 4 – just to tidy up …



Final days of the hotel … 




... as it was in 2017:





The fire – burning November 2019 …





Peeky-boo hotel …






Burnt out side …






Fallen middle …





Demolished – empty space … no photo – Storm Dennis is around … but architectural corbels saved from the Grade II* listed 70-room hotel ...



Eastbourne's Martello - known as the Wish Tower -
against which Pierre Bistrot 'sits' ... 

Along the Channel coast are vestiges of Martello towers: 74 of them, and 2 Redoubts – Napoleonic fortifications … some still around, others gone …




Rathfinny’s Vineyard … use extra thick green glass for their Sussex Sparkling wine … remember those apothecary bottles … green, blue and amber … then clear ones too – where if used the contents would deteriorate more quickly … as the light infiltrates and oxidises the contents …



I wonder how Rathfinny’s will find trading across the Channel and how other overseas areas will pan out – now that we’ve left the European Union: we are in a state of flux – being led rather fast forward into our unknown as I see it …


While the frontage was still in tact -
til it was demolished - thankfully before our next
storm, which is happening now ...

I had the poor old hotel battered by storms struggling to stay upright when ‘its corsets had been burnt’ … though it, nor I, have corsets around anymore … my brain is addled at the way the world is turning …



Thankfully Denise Covey’s WEP/IWSG Café Terrace prompt arrives soon … and I need a coffee to relax in the sun: it’s been awol recently …


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

41 comments:

Terra said...

It makes me sad to lose the handsome old style hotel, the building looks a treasure. It makes me imagine times from the 1920s or 30s, romantic old novels, etc. I wonder what will replace it? I hope something in good taste.

Elephant's Child said...

Sigh at yet more fire destruction. And storm destruction.
The world is overdue some gentler weather.
Aren't we all?

Nas said...

Oh, so sad. Destruction everywhere.

Chatty Crone said...

I am so sorry about that beautiful hotel.
So were you for or against England separating?

David M. Gascoigne, said...

Hello Hilary: I suppose there is a great deal of uncertainty now, not knowing exactly what is going to happen post Brexit. I know of people who own property in France and live there and operate a successful B&B. They will now have to carry a British passport rather than an EU passport, so travel will not be as smooth, and they are unsure as to their residency, and whether as non-members of the EU their business operations will be allowed to continue as before. I think they are a little more concerned than they care to admit. I am no expert on the issues involved, but it seems to me that this retreat into isolationism is far from a good thing.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

What a shame it had to be demolished. Fire is such a destructive force.

Botanist said...

That is very similar to St Peter Port's old Royal Hotel (the town where I was born). Closed down, then burned in mysterious circumstances. Had to be demolished to make way for office and housing development.

Michael Di Gesu said...

Hi Hilary,

Oh, I feel so sad about that beautiful old hotel. I LOVE grand structures from the past! Now that I am living in a 1920 Craftsman home, it makes me love it all the more. They just do put the time, talent, and grace into the structures of the present. Not like that did a century ago....

Joanne said...

very sad to see a grand place go up in smoke. Wow - the history, the shenanigans, the revelry...There's stories to tell there - go for it.

Liz A. said...

So sad when buildings burn.

Inger said...

So much is being destroyed in our world today. A glorious old hotel is sad. And so are so many other things. This is a time when we need strong, good and intelligent leaders and don't find very many of those around.

Hels said...

Thank you..I had forgotten about the martello towers.

They were something I had never thought about, until reading about how scary the French armies were, after the Revolution and during the Napoleonic Wars.

retirementreflections said...

Such a sad loss!

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

Oh no! What a gorgeous hotel it was.

Hope you'll get much better weather soon...you deserve a little sunshine!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Terra – yes … there must have been something intrinsically wrong with it … but we don’t know yet … though it was built around 1851 – 55 … so a little older.

@ EC – yes … they took a time to turn the gas off … so perhaps that contributed more to the fire; yes – it’d be nice to have some drier weather over here … and as you mention we’d all enjoy gentler times …

@ Nas – unfortunate … but there is destruction everywhere at times …

@ Sandie – yes it’s a historical landmark … there’s history in the housing along the sea-front. Actually I wanted to stay in the EU … but who knows … our children etc will experience what happens next (i.e. next generations) …

@ David – we’re all in a state of flux … I’m just glad I’m where I am in life – but it’s interesting to live through. Yes – there’s a lot of uncertainty … both with people here, and elsewhere in the world (especially on the continent); having just been with friends who voted to leave … I’m betwixt and between – just glad I don’t have to worry about it …

@ Alex – it was unsustainable in its shell state – and the poor building materials of the 1800s certainly didn’t help – but fire and storm do not mix!

@ Ian – ours at least happened the other way round – and it was occupied – thankfully no-one died and there was only one hospitalisation; so many properties though are purposefully burnt down - ? for insurance purposes … many it seems are …

@ Michael – yes they are magnificent buildings – this hotel and the one next to it were, originally, a range of 19th century terraced houses – before being converted to two hotels. It is expected they’ll be rebuilt – as it was a listed building.

@ Joanne – I know … fortunately the fire started at 8.50 am – so most people were up and about. Our sea-front has lots of stories to tell – and as you mention shenanigans, and revelry … I’m sadly not a story teller per se … but lots of storytellers around our Sussex coast …

@ Liz – yes one feels so sad …

@ Inger – it’s certainly sad to see the empty space … but one hopes the seafront will be re-opened to traffic … it’s been blocked off since the fire and is causing quite a lot of traffic hassle …

I do hope we can find sensible, caring leaders to take us forward in all areas of the world …

@ Hels – the Martello towers are an interesting defensive set of buildings – and yes I’ve just heard how scary Napoleon’s armies were … so your comment makes much more sense now!

@ Donna – yes … and a nuisance, as we’ve been unable to drive along the seafront since the fire – hope it’ll open soon.

@ Elizabeth – it was probably very old … but suited to coach holidays and it was just opposite the pier, so will be sorely missed.

I do hope the hail and cold winds go away soon!

Cheers to you all – and thanks for visiting … Hilary

Lisa said...

Oh wow, so sad when a beautiful building dies... I think of you and all my friends in the UK right now. Horrific flooding in Wales! Everything...

Jo said...

We still have the fortifications from the Second World War along with the Martello towers.

Sad about that hotel, such a lovely building. Fire is so destructive. Makes me think of Notre Dame.

Incredible to think of Britain producing sparkling wine, or any other wine really. Didn't when I was living there.

Jacqui Murray said...

That is sad, to see it burnt beyond hope. You've written a fitting eulogy, Hilary.

Yolanda Renée said...

WOW, such a beautiful building to die such a horrid death. Modernization did not help it to last!
I'm looking forward to the WEP too. Only days away now!

DMS said...

It was a beautiful hotel- but hard to stay standing against fire and storms. Sad!
~Jess

Dan said...

Sad to lose that hotel.

Rhodesia said...

So sad, I hate seeing buildings burnt or demolished.

Re Brexit, yes it really is the unknown and I am sure there are going to be more than a few hiccups. Thank goodness we have French resident permits (which we need to change sometime) and French driver's licences. As EU members were were allowed to vote at the local elections, sadly we now cannot! To become citizens is out of the question we need to be fluent. Nigel's French is not too bad but he is not fluent, mine is useless.

Have a good week, Diane

Friko said...

What a beautiful hotel it was, so sad to see it destroyed.
As for Brexit, you know my feelings about that. I wasn’t allowed to vote, even after all these decades in the UK. But I am and will remain a European, come what may. Sometimes I find it hard to stay an Anglophile.

bookworm said...

I remember seeing ruins of a structure Thomas Jefferson (one of our first Presidents and a man of many talents) had designed for a man who became Governor of Virginia and held other offices. The mansion was completed in 1822. The ruins sit on the grounds of a winery (the owners protect the ruins now) and you can see it from behind a fence. It's a fascinating study, these ruins, and have stood, crumbling, since a fire. It burned on Christmas Day 1884 - but yet it stands, somehow, year after year. Maybe like your hotel. (If this interests you, Google "Barbourville Ruins"). Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

So sad when lovely old buildings have to be demolished

Denise Covey said...

So sad when graceful old buildings are no more. Hope you're okay with the storms battering the UK.
Thanks for the shout out for Cafe Terrace. Any time's a good time to sit on a cafe terrace, except in a storm, LOL.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lisa – yes I know the building was gutted and is very sad. We do have lots of flooding around the place – it is spread all over the country and continues on …

@ Jo – yes there are lots of World War fortifications still around, as too Napoleonic ones. The hotel was a bit of a shock … and yes I must catch up on the Cathedral. We did grow grapes and make wine in the north of England in Roman times …

@ Jacqui – burnt beyond hope … thanks the sudden demise of the hotel in stages …

@ Renee – just desperately sad, as it stood … as required under statutory regulations the hotel would have had relatively good facilities … I’ve an idea for WEP – now need to write it!

@ Jess – the buildings along the front started off as private residences, before being converted into hotels – the coach company’s owners say they will look to rebuild.

@ Dan – yes … desperate …

@ Diane – the empty space will be haunting … but at least it’s down … and perhaps the sea-front can be opened for cars.
It’s ghastly all the ramifications Brexit is throwing up … and the convoluted choices … I hope you can find the best way out of the dilemma … and do what you want to do.

@ Friko – yes … the development is interesting … the original wealthy people’s houses, joined and turned into hotels (I don’t know when they were converted from private to hotel use … easy to find out, just not to hand!) – as were most of the buildings along the sea-front … the Duke of Devonshire opened up Eastbourne … but there were numerous covenants – still in place.

I can quite understand your feelings … Brexit has thrown up lots of quandaries …

@ Alana – thanks for the introduction to the Barboursville estate and now within their vineyards … interesting to read the history. I’m sure our ruins will be razed and a new hotel built over it … in due course – a few years I suspect.

@ Jo-Anne … yes but if the thing is a danger, and its potential collapse was blocking the sea-front from cars and pedestrians … it needed to come down.

@ Denise – I know … when one sees the demise of an iconic seafront hotel – it is sad: thank fully there weren’t any fatalities as it happened just before 9.00 am.

Pleasure re the WEP bloghop coming up tomorrow … I’ll be along – idea here, but need to write it.

Thanks everyone … I must get to see the ‘hole’ and how far they’ve cleared the debris. More rain on its way across Britain – all areas seem to be struggling with the storms and still rising river levels … thankfully all well here. Cheers for now - Hilary

Patsy said...

The burnt out building looks so sad. I won't comment on Brexit as I'm trying to remain in denial. Instead I'll raise an imaginary glass of sparkling wine and say 'cheers' hoping that a little of what we fancy is the best medicine.

Debbie D. said...

How sad to see this fine hotel destroyed by fire! :( As for Brexit, I can imagine things will be in turmoil for quite some time. It seems to me, the powers that be didn't take everything into consideration but I'm across the ocean, so that's just a superficial opinion. I hope it all works out!

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

It's such a tragedy to lose such a beautiful piece of history, but it's a blessing no people were caught in the fire. It must be very unsettling for you and other Brits to be embarking on your next stage in post-Brexit history. I honestly kept thinking there'd be another referendum and it would be voted down the second time around. (Shows ya how little I know!) The future may be unknown, but here's to it being wonderful.

Cheers!

mail4rosey said...

Such a sore sight to see. She sure was a beauty. I hope you got to enjoy that sun!! One of my favorite things to do.

Keith's Ramblings said...

Having lived in or near Eastbourne for most of my life, it's hard to imagine that particular part of the seafront without that iconic building. Although I'm in town several times a week, I've not been to have a look. I really don't want to just yet.

Shannon Lawrence said...

What a sad loss. It feels like we lose bits of our architectural history daily.

Elsie Amata said...

It's so sad to see a historic building with so much damage and destruction. It's almost like an emotional loss when a structure like that is gone from our sight.

Elsie
(my new domain)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Patsy – well it’s no longer there to stare emptily down at us … though many of us stare worryingly across the Channel – as you … the future is not easy. Yes I could have more of that Sussex Sparkling … trying to stay off it for now … but a little of what we fancy always help.

@ Debbie – I know … the Burlington next door is also under the cosh and can’t open – until it’s secured and is safe once again – the Burlington will continue on, once repaired.

Turmoil here is pretty awful … who knows where it’ll all go – I just (selfishly) hope it’s not too inconvenient.

@ Susan – yes, thank goodness there was no serious injury. Life ahead for us … is very strange and unsettling … I am glad I’m of the age I am. I’m somewhat shocked at where we’re at … with the parliamentary majority so enormous … but yes – here’s to keeping our heads above water and living life to enjoy …

@ Rosey – I can’t wait for the sun … more rain today! The seafront is very pretty …

@ Keith – the seafront is very odd – especially with the blank on the pier that was due to be replaced after that earlier fire. The walks down the seafront in the coming months will be strange – let’s hope they rebuild it soon …

@ Shannon – it’s just so sad – another bit of history gone … as you say we lose architectural beauty so much now-a-days …

@ Elsie – the early fire was very destructive … and left the structure in a terrible state – it couldn’t stay standing …

Thanks everyone – good to see you all – still raining here! cheers Hilary

troutbirder said...

It surely can keep us warm and also destroy what we love and even our fondest memories...........

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Ray - fire can be horrendous, storms too ... good to see you - cheers Hilary

Juliet said...

How sad to see such a beautiful old building being burned down.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Juliet - yes I heard about it as I caught a train to the Midlands ... and eventually went to see it ... and then the various stages of its decline. It was really badly burnt and couldn't stay up - especially with the gales we've been having. Thanks for coming by - cheers Hilary

Lynda Dietz said...

Even though I know sometimes buildings must be demolished (as in the case of a fire), it still pains me to see beautiful old architecture destroyed.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lynda - actually this necessary demolition has led to some interesting possibilities ... my post today 31 March will elucidate! Cheers - and apologies for not acknowledging your comment earlier - Hilary