Tuesday, 31 March 2020

Promenade in 1850 along the Eastbourne seafront …




No development yet … settlement, with grand estates, yes, but no seaside town … however the railways had arrived in 1849 … life was moving on … a new seaside town had been promulgated.


 
Cavendish Arms
(the grandson of the Duke holds the title
Earl of Burlington as a courtesy title)
The Earl of Burlington, before he became the 7th Duke of Devonshire in 1858, had had plans produced in 1836, but it was not until 1859 and 1872, after new plans were adopted, that the formation of the town as we know it today commenced.





Burlington Hotel, just west of the Claremont -
burnt down in 2019
The promenade is a wonderful straight … with three levels … class came into play in the 1800s … us, them, and me!  Well no – you know what I mean … them up there, the middle lot and the rest: e.g. the servants …





Eastbourne - the straight promenade;
the pier to the east, beyond which would be the servants'
quarters, the kitchen gardens, orchards, etc
while to the west along the front were the
high-class hotels, the theatres, Devonshire Park tennis
courts (part of the Devonshire estate)  and other
developments

At the easterly end the pier was built – a defining point along the seafront … it interrupts what would otherwise have been a ribbon development of buildings: to the west, high class hotels, with modest family hotels and boarding houses to the east.




The Claremont in full conflagration, the Burlington Hotel
abuts the Claremont.  The entrance to the pier is
nearly opposite, at the easterly end of the Promenade
The pier is opposite the end of the Claremont, as it was, to the west stretches the Grand Parade towards the Downs and Beachy Head, while eastwards were the kitchen gardens, laundries, coal stores, lodgings for the servants, gardeners etc …





Sorry - one of my blue mobile phone pics ...
it is a drawing done in 1850 - looking west towards
Beachy Head; the Roman Villa remains are shown in
the lower left of the image - where the pier has been built.
… it was at this point 2,000 years ago that a Roman Villa stood – so one advantage to come out of Claremont’s conflagration is that 21st century archaeological techniques can be used to perhaps uncover hidden treasures …




The Claremont as it was in the 21st century
… there was a Foundation Stone ‘the foundation of the new town laid in the spring of 1851’, which was still there in 1898 – its whereabouts unknown today – so who knows what might be found.





Not much as changed really from about 1900 - the end of the
terrace before conversion to the hotels
The fire that destroyed the Claremont claimed about one third of the Grade II* Listed building … 




You can see the end of the burnt hotel -
similar in appearance to the one taken about 120 years before
... originally designed as a terrace of 19 four storey high houses – before being converted into the hotels we see today … the Burlington occupying the other two-thirds of the Victorian Terrace.



I won’t be doing the A – Z … tempted though I might be – I will try and do a few fun posts and will do the WEP prompt during April and then get to the more interesting posts about my escapades to various museums and exhibitions as the year moves on.




Tempted I am – but I must put priorities first – and home needs some major sorting … which confinement will help … just hope it doesn’t last the gestatory nine months!  That would surprise a few …




Take care – there’s much to worry us at the moment … I’m trying to keep away from posting about it – too much other information around … my cherubic, non-opinionated jottings will have to do  … to keep us connected.  Enjoy the A - Z anyone who is participating …


Youtube: “Class System” skit 1966 with John Cleese, Ronnie Barker and Ronnie Corbett … this clarifies our classes!!  Absolutely classic ... makes me laugh and remember back to watching with my parents ... just brilliant ... enjoy.


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

52 comments:

Kay G. said...

Thankful for the Duke of Devonshire and the plan of Eastbourne! As an American, it is so nice to see buildings ACROSS the road from the beach so as not to spoil the lovely views of the sea! I ADORE Eastbourne, as I am sure you know! And when I mentioned that you had that from YouTube with John Cleese and the two Ronnies, he said, "I look down on YOU." He knew just what you had on here!
My father in law lives in Eastbourne. We visited him in October last year, don't know when we can see him again.
Be safe. x

Terra said...

I recall reading your post about the Claremont burning down, and I felt like a significant building with a history had gone. Do you know what is happening with it now? What will replace it? It is nice to read about other things rather than the current crisis so thank you.

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
Thank you for the light relief, Hilary - so sad about the Claremont, but if archaeology benefits, then let's accept that silver lining! Good luck with the 'house stuff'! YAM xx

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

There's a certain style to seaside-town architecture which is difficult to pin down but is charming nonetheless. Their very future depended on them looking attractive.

Janie Junebug said...

What a beautiful place. It's a shame about the fire, but you're right about the opening of archaeological opportunities. Yet another place I want to visit.

Love,
Janie

bazza said...

We stayed at the DeVere Grand in Eastbourne some years ago. I think it was for a Ladies Night. I remember we had a huge corner-room with a sea-view and a view to the side. We both really liked Eastbourne. That was my first time there since being a child!
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s unexpectedly uxorious Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Shame such a grand old building was destroyed by fire.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Kay - I know you have an interest in Eastbourne and your FIL is here ... perhaps you haven't picked up my earlier comments about your visits and my desire to connect ... especially on your visit here last October ... but still - it's good to see you here ...

@ Terra - thanks for remembering ... yes it's an important 'space' on the seafront - they did say right at the beginning it would be researched and restored in due course - now the 'in due course' seems a long way away - it will be repaired.

@ Yam - I can't write about what's going on ... it is very sad - and of course now the restoration will take even longer ... years I guess ...

@ John - there seems to be a 'certain style' ... what is interesting about our Sussex seaside towns is the difference between Brighton, Eastbourne and St Leonards-Hastings ... and how they were each developed ... thankfully people love visiting and may they come back in whatever time frame occurs ...

@ Janie - it's pretty awful about the fire - the 2nd major one in the town in recent years; but as you mention we may find some further information on the Roman Villa buried beneath our seafront and pier ... one small advantage ...

@ Bazza - the Grand is pretty special ... with lots of history. Amazing room you seem to have had - especially for the views ... that I can imagine. So pleased you enjoyed your visit down here ...

@ Alex - yes the fire was desperate - we couldn't believe it ...

Thanks for visiting ... so good to see you - take care and look after yourselves - cheers Hilary

Elephant's Child said...

Huge thanks.
This was something I hadn't considered, and my mind is happily wandering down quite a few rabbit holes.
I particularly liked John's comment about the future of seaside towns depending on being attractive. Attractive AND functional, which seems to be a combination that many modern areas cannot achieve.

Chatty Crone said...

It is sad when a beautiful historic building burns down.
SO off topic - what do you think of Megan and Harry?
STAY WELL.

Liz A. said...

Looks like the town is well planned. I am not doing A to Z either. Good luck with your plans.

Joanne said...

love the concept of a promenade and such grand buildings. I can imagine the gentry strolling on a Sunday - top hats, gloves, belles of the ball.
And just the name John Cleese means there's a laugh in store. He can play haughty like no other.
Your posts always add a panache to my day. Good luck with sorting - don't go too crazy.
Good health and cheers.

Sandra Cox said...

That hotel goes on and on and on.
Stay safe. Stay healthy.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC - that's great if it took your mind off things and you could let your mind wander around some of our history. Yes we have only 180 degrees of land ... but in that space we're meant to provide lots of extra fun things to do ... yet the town needs to live too. We're lucky here - we do have the South Downs to see at the moment, hopefully soon we'll be allowed to get back out walking there ...

@ Sandie - it is sad to see historic things get destroyed; Harry and Megan are human and are making the best decisions for them - as far as I'm concerned ... sad for us, but I understand.

@ Liz - Eastbourne does its best ... and thanks re the plans ... take care and enjoy your 'time off' from the A-Z ...

@ Joanne - it's the three levels that's interesting ... where the class system was definitely defined in the development of the Promenade. You're right the youtube clip is just brilliant ... reminds me of my early adult days ... such fun - very satirical. Thanks Joanne - 'panache' is an honour - while I sort and it's important I do it, I'll remember panache ...

@ Sandra - yes it was originally a terrace of 19 houses ...

Thanks so much to you all - as you wish me ... I wish you stay safe and well ... take care - Hilary

David M. Gascoigne, said...

Interesting post, Hilary. Continue to stay well during these trying times, and keep yourself busy. That is the key, it seems.

Patsy said...

It's easy to look at towns and think they must always have been there, and always have been similar in some ways to their present form, but of course that isn't always the case. Most will probably have just expanded gradually, perhaps changing character equally gradually – others appeared quickly, or have undergone radical transformations.

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

I remember the beautiful Claremont when I was there in 1991-ish...this makes me so sad. Hoping they have plans to restore it to its former glory.

Keith's Ramblings said...

When I owned a property in Silverdale Road I seem to remember having to pay some kind of land duty to the Duke of Dev!

Who'd have thought all those years ago that Eastbourne would go on to have Europes largest marina complex?

Susan Flett Swiderski said...

The historical aspect and grand architecture of so many of your buildings makes them so very special. It's a shame how quickly fire can destroy all of that. I hope the hotel is restored to its former glory, rather than be replaced by something glaringly "practical" and lacking in style.

Take care, dear lady. Cheers!

Jacqui Murray said...

Wonderful post and a nice break from the 'conflagration' that surrounds us. I have debated using that word when I'm talking about fire and it always sounds pretentious or old. Not here, though. They used amazing words in the 1850ish. 'Palaver' comes to mind...

Sandra Cox said...

'Hoping confinement doesn't last 9 mos.' Ha. Good one.
Stay safe. Stay healthy. Cheers.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ David - thanks ... I just wanted to put something different up. You too look after yourselves - I'm fine here ... quite busy - as I've lots I need to get done...

@ Patsy - I know we forget how much has changed over the years ... and if we're not living in the same area throughout our lives then we just don't realise. Around London lots of change has occurred ...

@ Elizabeth - oh gosh I'd remembered you visited here in the early 1990s - it was very sad when it went up ... especially as the pier had gone up in smoke a few years earlier ... I hope they repair it ... how long now, is another matter ...

@ Keith - oh right - that I didn't know ... I must ask around ... as I'm renting at the moment. Yes - and what will happen to the Marina now ... especially as we'll be leaving the European Union - interesting times ...

@ Susan - it is a town of historic value ... and the terrace facade will be replaced ... with I expect a more uptodate hotel behind ... it won't be a box - at least not from the front!

@ Jacqui - thank you ... I don't want or need to post about Covid - so am trying to work out easy posts during April and then will step up with some more interesting ones in due course ...

Interesting about palaver - I'd have spelt it differently: without checking! And gather it's 'chatter' of a Portuguese origin ...

@ Sandra - thanks for picking up the 'confinement' bit ... I do hope for one and all it doesn't last that long ...

Thank so much to you all ... as Sandra says: Stay safe. Stay Healthy ... look after yourselves, your family and friends - all the best Hilary

Nilanjana Bose said...

It's awful sad when heritage buildings burn down.

Sorry to hear that you're not doing the A-Z, you'll be missed.

Keep safe and stay well. And my goodness I'm hoping it's not going to stretch to nine months. See you at WEP! Take care,

Nila.

Sue Bursztynski said...

Thanks for the interesting post! I have heard Eastbourne is a place where people go to retire?

Anabel Marsh said...

Interesting. I didn’t know that Eastbourne was a planned town, rather than one which grew organically.

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

So very interesting

L. Diane Wolfe said...

Scary how quickly fire can take away such a large, old building. I wonder what history they will find under it?

retirementreflections said...

Hi, Hilary - Your cherubic jottings are wonderful!!! Keep them coming!

cleemckenzie said...

I'm envying the guy who had that Roman Villa in such a prime location. It will be interesting to see if they do an intensive excavation of that site.


I'm not doing the A to Z again this year. I think my steamers out of order these days, and gearing up for that challenge isn't in me. Glad you'll be going for the WEP. That is always great fun.

Take care. You seem to be doing well. Hurray for that.

D.G. Kaye said...

Happy to read your cherubic jottings. Thanks for another lovely tour too Hilary. Happy decluttering <3

Lynda R Young as Elle Cardy said...

Those buildings were magnificent. Shame about the fire.
They don't make 'em like they used to.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Nila - it is sad ... it changes the 'landscape'; thanks re the A-Z ... I just decided I needed to clear things up here - while there's no going out etc! Well I sure hope it doesn't take 9 months ... but I suspect the world's experience may well stretch over the months ...

@ Sue - it used to be a retirement place ... but now it's a vibrant society as it's easier to travel - just once home we have the seaside!

@ Anabel - the little village nestling under the Downs and villages around a stream, or along the edge of the Downs where springs are found - then the nobility on the prompt of the Royals ... came down (or were already here) bought land and over time developed the central town ... the rest sprang up as needs must: your organic mode. I suppose it's not developed as such ... but the Dukes has put restrictive practices in place that builders have had to adhere to for over 170 years ... so it's got lots of space in its streets ...

@ Jo-Anne - thank you ...

@ Diane - yes ... this old building went up quite quickly; they may find the foundation stone, small artefacts ... buttons, military bits and other bobs and even possibly using 21st technology - they may be able to see down to the Roman Villa and the remains there ...

@ Donna - thanks re my cherubic jottings ...

@ Lee - yes ... it was one of the essential landing places along the coast - sheltered by the chalk cliffs of Beachy Head.

I'd like to have done the A-Z ... but have my plans if it happens next year ... or put up in some other way.

All well here and finally getting on with the sorting ...

@ Debby - thank you ... glad you enjoyed the promenade ... and I'll be happy once I've done most of my sorting out.

@ Lynda - actually if you see what they were made of - it might be a good idea it'll be updated. But I do love our range of architecture that we find in Britain.

Thanks for visiting, look after yourselves and take care - Hilary

Inger said...

I wanted to post about Stockholm's first suburb - my writings would required two posts! You have managed so well here to narrow it down to what's important. You are an inspiration. I will go back and see if I can edit some more.

Deborah Barker said...

Glad you are keeping busy Hilary and I think you are right to post about 'other' things. The TV is, rightly, full of updates. I am finding it quite difficult to write anything but hoping this phase will pass since I do have oodles of time. Dave, and the friend who lives with us, are both working from home and I am getting used to sharing my daytime space. We will be out in the garden clapping and making noise with the old school bell tonight! I am sure the cacophony noise from the entire country, will be heard by all! X

David Powers King said...

Such a lovely building, shame about the fire.

Hope you're staying safe and healthy out there! :)

Rhodesia said...

I used to hate history at school now I find it fascinating. You always interest me with something that is new to me.
Re the nine months, if the hospitals have sorted out the present problem they will probably run out of space again!!
We all seem to be extra busy with this isolation, I know we both seem to have less spare time than normal which will not make any difference in 9 months!!!!!
Have a good weekend and stay safe. Cheers Diane

Deborah Weber said...

Sad about the fire and the loss of the beautiful building. But it's an interesting reminder of how things are built upon the old, and everything is part of the cycle. I've been thinking about that a lot lately.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Inger - that's great ... I'm looking forward to reading it - I admit I had some notes to refer to ... it'll be fun to find out about early Stockholm.

@ Deborah - I think we all only need to see, read what we need to - just get on with our own lives as is possible. I couldn't get on with things at first ... but now I seem to be more organised; sounds like you've got the right approach ... being peaceful and sharing your space.

Isn't the country's appreciation of the British people, who continue to help so many ... wonderful we're out recognising in the main for the NHS, and all associated people helping keeping this country running. Love the idea of your bell ...

@ David - yes that run of terraces is pretty amazing - I'm glad some of it is still standing and they'll restore the facade. All well here - thank you ...

@ Diane - I too could never understand much at school, if I'm frank! But history - I did scrape through ... though, like you, today am surprised how interested I am.

There is still lots to do - unless of course one has completely downsized and cleared clutter out - I'm glad I have a plethora of books! But if the post-war baby boom occurs again - life will be interesting ... lots of home births.

@ Deborah - yes the fire has caused a blight on the seafront; when we can get back to some degree of normality it will be interesting to see what they can find out about earlier times ... so as you say everything has a cycle ... before rebuilding occurs.

Thank you so much for your visits ... keep cheerful, be positive during this challenging time ... our seafront will be around for another few centuries yet ... take care - Hilary

Empty Nest Insider said...

Hi Hilary, What a tragedy to lose such a stunning building. I do remember some of your wonderful A to Z themes! Good luck sorting out your home, and please take good care of yourself.

Julie

Elsie Amata said...

What a stunning building the hotel was. The picture of the fire is just heartbreaking. Have fun with your spring sorting. I need to do the same!

Stay healthy and safe,
Elsie

vesseys said...

We will miss you in the A to Z but completely understand.
I tried to comment a few days ago and for some reason I could not get in to your blog - odd.
Be well during these odd times.

~Moonie

J Lenni Dorner said...

Sorry you're not doing A to Z. I get it though, everything is tough right now.

Interesting that where I am in the US, a promenade is almost always an outdoor shopping mall. Like a strip mall, but with nicer landscaping and better seating.

Great pictures. I learned a lot from your post, as I always do.

I moved my blog. https://jlennidorner.blogspot.com

Hels said...

Britain's summers aren't boiling hot, but living opposite a lovely beach in a beautiful hotel is perfect way to spend the summer holidays. I haven't been to the Claremont Hotel in Eastbourne since the fire, but the view was inspiring, the gardens were a pleasure and the town still has lovely facilities within walking distance.

Be healthy!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Julie – it was originally separate houses built around a square – before developments changed with the times … the square and gardens behind being built over as the town became more populated. Thank you - I have more themes tucked away – just decided not this year, but again anon … .

@ Elsie – it was pretty poorly built, not really complying with our health and safety – possibly why the fire occurred – they haven’t confirmed yet. My sorting has started – and I’ll get to do more – thought I might read this pm … that will be a shock to my system!

@ Lesley – thank you … but felt I must bow out, though had an idea, or two or three lined up …

Glad you were able to get here to comment – things happen and then seem to correct themselves … why – we can only wonder. Thanks for trying again …

@ JL – it wasn’t what was happening – it’s a couple of things … one I need to sort. Promenade dates back to the latin derivations of to take a walk along a path near water …

@ Hels – our summers aren’t usually boiling – thankfully! Beautiful when we get good ones – this weekend (sadly with lockdown) looks the start of a good season ahead.
Unfortunately the beach is shingle – brought in to protect the seafront … our Victorian engineers were pretty dynamic in what they could do … with groynes to disseminate the power of the waves, and shingle shipped to the shore, to protect the land.

However as you say – Eastbourne is a comfortable seaside town to spend a few days in – while Beachy Head and the Downs offer some splendid walks, and the history of Pevensey takes us back in time … it’s a good place – thank you.

Thanks for visiting – great to see you all – take care with this dreaded disease … all the best - Hilary

Victoria Marie Lees said...

I learn so much at your blog, Hilary. What a magnificent looking hotel. And such a history. It's a shame it burned down. Organizing the home. Boy! Do I need to do that. I've got a lifetime of stuff that needs to be pared down and organized and shared with family. All best to you, my dear. Stay safe!

lostinimaginaryworlds.blogspot.com said...

Always a fascinating blog, Hilary, and thank you as always for your kindness and support 🌹

Bish Denham said...

Stay safe and well, Hilary. Many (((hugs))) from across the pond.

diedre Knight said...

Lovely post, as always, Hilary. I often feel as if I'm walking along with you to all these gorgeous places you introduce. The building engulfed in flames was sure distressing. When the top two floors of one of our oldest buildings were destroyed by fire, it helped relieve the pain of loss when they rebuilt at least one of the floors.
Stay in, stay healthy, be happy!

Marja said...

Oh how sad to see such grand building burning. Good luck with organising things. Hope you are keeping safe. Kia kaha Hilary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Victoria - I'm just glad you enjoy being here and commenting. Very sad about the hotel ... and a shock to another seafront building going up in smoke - a building on the pier a few years ago.

Clearing out is a pain - I tried before I went off to Canada - now with another few years under my belt is the time for a good de-clutter.

@ Carol Anne - pleasure to come across and see you, and be there in the background for you both ...

@ Bish - pleasure ... would love the hugs in person ... but will definitely take the thought ... all well thank you ...

@ Diedre - that's great ... as long as you can imagine life with me; I was on my way to London and on to friends that day so didn't really find out about it til later. Re-building - I hope they'll get on with it - but am glad they 'fixed' yours as best they could. All well here - structured life has set in ...

@ Marja - it must have been horrific to see it happening; love your sign off ... 'kia kaha' - what a great Maori phrase ... love it.

Thanks so much to you all for being here - wonderful sunny day here ... I'll be out for a walk anon ... in the meantime - some sorting! All the best and kia kaha ... Hilary

DMS said...

Stay safe!

What an interesting post. I also have a lot to sort out at home and I am really hoping to have some writing time soon. I've been working from home and things are definitely busy lately.

Hugs!
~Jess

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Jess - glad you enjoyed it; I can understand it must be difficult working from the home environment - always distractions ... take care and get that time for writing fitted in. Hugs across the pond to you too - all the best - Hilary