Sunday, 30 April 2017

Z is for Zebra, Zoo and Zetland …



Queen Charlotte’s Zebra was the first zebra to be seen in England in 1762 … and as you’d expect was hugely popular … George Stubbs painted her …

Zebra by George Stubbs 1763


 … and immediately grasped the differences between zebras and horses … 



... so much so it is recorded with zoological verisimilitude that it can be identified today as the smallest of the three subspecies of zebra: the Cape Mountain.


Cape Mountain Goat in the Cape, South Africa



She lived on in England for 11 years … first at Buckingham House (now Palace) and then at The Tower of London, where she shared her accommodation with an elephant.




The connection here is that William Hunter (Scottish Anatomist), elder brother of John Hunter, (the Surgeon), was Accoucheur to the Queen, George III's wife.  Both were interested in anatomy of one sort or the other … both opened Museums to hold their collections.


The Enlightenment Room
of the British Museum - restored to
show the conception of a museum
Christopher Plumb – whose thesis on Exotic Animals in the 18th century – has been taken up and turned into a book … he has noted the bawdy songs that sprang up from visits to ‘the Queen’s Ass’ …



Apparently his studies are called ‘Museology’ … or Museum Studies … the study of museums, museum curations, and how museums developed into their institutional role in education through social and political forces.


Donkey with Sheep in the snow
So as we leave another A-Z year behind … I bid you farewell from a country with Zetland in it … the West Country Shires of Devon, Dorset and Somerset … where ‘S’ is still pronounced as a ‘Z’ …


Zedland or Zetland are the old slang names for the west counties of Dorset, Somerset, Devon and Cornwall ...


Widecombe Moor - part of
Zedland, 


That is Z for Zebra, Zoo and Zedland … from Aspects of British County Rare Breeds …





Counties with the letter Z … 
(note some Counties have been retired!, or amended over historical local government … but some I’ve included)
England: None
Northern Ireland: None
Scotland:  None
Wales:  None



Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

63 comments:

Elephant's Child said...

Thank you so much for a fascinating A-Z. And how lovely to finish with the stylish zebra. Mind you, I suspect that she and the elephant both missed their warmer homelands.

Roberto - a.k.a. 'Grumpy1' said...

Great work on the A-Z series, H. Phew. Must've taken some research? Thanks.

Patsy said...

I like zebras. They always look friendly.

Congratulations on a really interesting A-Z.

Liz A. said...

Museum studies...? I had no idea. And it's pronounced Zomerzet? Considering that one of the schools I work at has that name... They'll look at me funny if I try that.

Sophie Duncan said...

Congrats at reaching the end :)

I've always had a soft spot for zebras, they always strike me as plucky creatures :)

Sophie
Sophie's Thoughts & Fumbles - Dragon Diaries

Diane S said...

Love Zebras and I did not know Stubbs has painted one, and one belonging to royalty whats more. I always learn from you, excellent post Hilary, thanks. Have a good Sunday Diane

Sue Bursztynski said...

Goodness, the equine artist even painted a zebra! This is fascinating. And thanks for a very entertaining A to Z! I'd like to follow and see what your non-A to Z posts are like.

Shirley Corder said...

Thank you for another beautiful post. I've loved your A to Z series, Hilary. The zebra is one of my favourite animals. We, of course, see a lot of zebra in the wild here in S.Africa, often grazing alongside their good friends, the giraffes. It's been a good month. Thank you for your posts and your visits to mine. Add Zing and Zeal as you Build a Better Blog #atozchallenge

sage said...

Zebras are so beautiful... Congratulations on completing the A-Z

http://sagecoveredhills.blogspot.com/2017/04/z-is-for-zodiac.html

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

That definitely looks like a petite zebra in the Stubbs painting. Fascinating story! Here in Charlotte, NC, we're fond of Queen Charlotte (as ironic as that might sound!) I visited the Mint Museum last weekend and there was a large painting of Queen Charlotte there. :)

Congratulations on another great A-Z!

Vinodini Iyer said...

Your theme was quite challenging, Hilary. I often wondered where you got all your data from. Getting an animal for each alphabet must have been quite a challenge. Congratulations on finishing such a tough challenge!

A Cuban In London said...

That was such a great read. Hot cup of coffee in hand and doing my regular blog-round. Thanks a lot for that.

Greetings from London.

Keith's Ramblings said...

Just a few months ago I was surrounded by Zebras. They looked too perfect to be real! I'm pleased we don't pronounce our county Zussex, aren't you? Thank you for a great month Hilary, it's been both entertaining and informative.

It's farewell to Amble Bay!

Bob Scotney said...

Thanks for an interesting and very informative A-Z, I learnt a lot I didn't know.
Zetland is a name in a wide use in the north east area where we live.

The Stubbs Zebra is remarkable, depicted so accurately.

Enjoy your rest!

FinnBadger said...

I loved your A-Z, thanks for all your research and fun info this month.

Phillip | Z is for Zines Zoinks! I made it to the end!

Mike@Bit About Britain said...

I don't think I knew more than 10% of that, Hilary. Fascinating as always; meticulously researched! I must confess that I can't see a zebra without being reminded of a ridiculous joke that features a seaside donkey, but it's far too rude (and long) for here! Thanks for your latest visit, too http://bitaboutbritain.com/baddesley-clinton-medieval-manor-murder-mayhem-and-mellowness/

PS - Congratulations on your excellent A-Z!

Kristin said...

Congratulations on finishing the A to Z. The zebra looks as if she is posing for her portrait.
http://findingeliza.com/archives/23192

Jz said...

Terrific job on the A-Z, Hilary!
I've enjoyed reading your posts and getting to meet you.
Thank you.

Emily Bloomquist said...

I have enjoyed your A-Z series, Hilary! Thank you for providing information on so many various breeds and animals. Congratulations on completing the challenge.

Emily | My Life In Ecuador | Zoo - I live in one!

beste barki said...

It's been an original, enjoyable and informative A-Z, Hilary.

bazza said...

Thank you for a brilliant Tour de Force! No zzzzz's here! No you can go and lay down in a darkened room......
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s rubbish Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

bookworm said...

A wonderful ending, and I will miss reading your daily animal posts. The Unknown Journey Ahead agingonthespectrum.blogspot.com

Jo said...

You certainly made it a good one Hilary thanks so much. So much fascinating information. Congratulations on finishing the A to Z.

Truedessa said...

Congrats on making it through the A to Z. I haven't been around much this month. I will have to read through some of your posts. Have a lovely day!

Madeleine Sara said...

Sweet! Lovely way to end this year's a-z challenge. I wonder how many zebras there are featuring in this challenge and whether anyone has done any stats on it? x

Debbie D. said...

I learned so much here, Hilary. Such a fascinating theme. Zebras are beautiful creatures. Love the artwork! Congratulations on another successful A to Z Challenge! See you around the Blogosphere.

DMS said...

I have learned so much from your A-Z posts! I didn't know how the first Zebra got to England and now I feel a little smarter. Good way to start my day. Zebras are so pretty and interesting. :)

Congrats on finishing A-Z! Bravo!
~Jess

Ronel Janse van Vuuren said...

Love the painting by George Stubbs :-) Thanks for all the interesting posts this month.

Jacqui Murray said...

Zebras and zoos--sure, but where the heck is Zetland? I probably missed a metaphor in there somewhere.

Deborah Weber said...

Museology and the Enlightenment Room - wow, I'm swooning with these terms. What a great ending to a very fine series Hilary - I've learned so much here. Congratulations on finishing the challenge, and now it's time to put your feet up and relax!

Jemima Pett said...

Ah, Zummerzet, I miss the sounds....

I painted a picture of a zebra once. It's very interesting getting the stripes to lie correctly. A bit like a Mondrian squares picture - it has to be just right to look good :)

Jemima reveals Zanzibar's Rings (Viridian System #3)

Anabel Marsh said...

Congratulations on reaching Z! I missed a couple of posts near the end through being out of wifi / phone coverage but really enjoyed the rest.

Zetland is also an old name for Shetland!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC – thanks so much ... just delighted with your thoughts – and I’m sure they missed their warmer climes …

@ Bob – thanks so much … a little research?! But fun at the same time …

@ Patsy – zebras are amazing to look at … so pleased you enjoyed it …

@ Liz – I know when I found out about Museology and Christopher Plump’s research I had to put them in … yes Zomerzet – as I’ve added a note in … well there’s some good jokes coming along your way I think …

@ Sophie – thanks … zebras are just lovely to see out in the bush …

@ Diane – yes Stubbs was an incredibly interesting artist … he’d had a passion for human anatomy from his childhood – which then spread to animals and he was considered the foremost painter of animals, as his art was so realistic …

@ Sue – as I mentioned to Diane above … he was an outstanding animal artist too ... delighted you’ve enjoyed the A-Zs here … my other posts are similar … but will love having you along and commenting as and when …

@ Shirley – thanks so much – really appreciate the comment. Zebras are brilliant aren’t they – I have happy memories of life in southern Africa; giraffe are special too … I’ll be over to take in some of your ideas in your Building a Better Blog post series …

@ Sage – thank you so much ... zebras are lovely …

@ Elizabeth – she does look small doesn’t she – she is the smallest of the 3 species: the Cape Mountain zebra – probably why she could be caught.

I read a bit more about your (our) Queen Charlotte – and her painting in the Mint Museum … and then more about poor Queen Charlotte …

Thanks re the A-Z … I’ve enjoyed doing it this year …

@ Vinodini – once I decided on the theme I needed to match the letters and make the content interesting … so I go off piste occasionally as in Y for Artists, J for Jellicles … and I had some information in books, picked up information as it came along … and went to a Rare Breeds Show in July 2015 … but that was when I realised I’d need to go off piste (as mentioned above) … so if I like theme, I don’t worry too much about being perfect for the rest … delighted you enjoyed the posts though …

@ ACIL – well done … sometimes, as in the A-Z, one needs more than one cup of coffee … but I’ll be over to read yours soon … but I’m delighted you enjoyed this post …

@ Keith – luck you with that trip – must have been lovely … it is a wonderful part of the world. Uh uh Zuzzex would be terrible – oh I see you’ve spelt it Zussex … but rambling through your Bay has been a delightful interlude in the era of another A-Z …

@ Bob – I can reliably tell you that I learnt a mass too … and thanks for clarifying Zetland is a name in the North East too –

Stubbs’ paintings are quite amazing as they were painted over 200 years ago … perfect representations …

@ Phillip – that’s great – it’s been good to be over and see art presented so cleverly

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Mike – well I can reliably tell you I knew so little – thank goodness it’s here on the blog! I’ve learnt loads. Now I’m not sure I know the zebra-donkey joke ... I’m sure I could find it – but will leave that thought for now!

Love your informative posts … and am delighted you enjoyed these …

@ Kristin – thanks so much … she’s a pretty zebra isn’t she …

@ Jz – so glad you enjoyed your read and it was good meeting up …

@ Emily – delighted to meet you and to read your A-Z about Ecuador – fascinating to see the variety of animals you have around … so glad we met up here …

@ Beste – thanks so much … I enjoyed doing the write ups …

@ Bazza – brilliant thank you … sadly no rest for the wicked – but that’s life … I need to be bright eyed and bushy tailed …! Did I write about one of those? No I don’t think so!

@ Bookworm – thanks so much – there’ll be other posts …

@ Jo – glad you enjoyed it …

@ Truedessa – thanks for coming over today … and I hope you enjoy the other posts when you get to read them …

@ Madeleine – oh gosh … I’m going to carry on wondering how many zebras there are!!

@ Debbie – delighted and thank you … I enjoyed your history with the appropriate music – as I could relate at times … yes the art works are excellent aren’t they …

@ Jess – so glad you enjoyed visiting, reading and acquiring some information – I aim to please! It is interesting to know how they transported the animals from Africa to England … not sure I’d have liked to make the journey … poor things (as there were two zebra – one survived) … but they are so pretty …

@ Ronel – George Stubbs was an exceptional artist … and it’s been good meeting people like you …

@ Jacqui – I clarified the Zetland bit with you earlier by email and added it into the post … also Bob commented that Zetland is used in the north east …

@ Deborah – I know Museology and the Enlightenment Room at the British Museum … those two things caught my eye – and I cannot leave things out. Just delighted you’ve enjoyed your visits … I’m going to have some Pronoia, Quiety and Peace now …

@ Jemima – I knowz Zummerzet … I too miss the sounds. I wish I could draw – not something that came my way … I imagine it’d be difficult to get the stripes to lie just right … while attempting a Mondrian Square would probably be worse …

@ Anabel – thanks – oh yes Zetland for Shetland … it’s been good that you’ve been able to visit when you can …

Cheers to you all – congratulations to those finishing the A-Z and to those who commented whether participating or not … I’ve appreciated all your comments, your support and interest in my fairly unusual subject – Hilary

Gail M Baugniet - Author said...

Your photographs today are particularly entrancing, Hilary. The Cape Mountain goats/zebras had me mesmerized and Zedland is a verdant fairyland.

Congratulations on completing this year's AtoZChallenge.
Blog on!

SENCO Cat Herder said...

Once again you have managed to complete another fascinating topic - I just can't imagine the hours you must spend on research for it all!! It has been lovely reading them on the Challenge and thank you for all your visits and comments on my blog too - you are one very busy lady, Hilary :)
http://pempispalace.blogspot.co.uk/2017/04/z-is-for-zola-zenith.html

Lenny Lee said...

hooray! you got through the A to Z challenge and every post was interesting and taught me new things. interesting stuff about the zebra and royalty. im surprised it didn't end up somewhere on the coat of arms. and...what about zelda? :)

Joanne said...

Excellent in-depth topic for A to Z. Your enthusiasm shone through. Congrats and thanks for a fun April roaming the UK

Nilanjana Bose said...

This was a brilliant end to a fascinating A-Z series, Hilary. Enjoyed each one. The queens zebra must have turned a few heads when she made an entry into the palace grounds :)

Incidentally, I have a museologist in my close family..

Congratulation the completion of a spectacular A-Z. Good things come to those who wait. :)

Best always,
Nila.

D.G. Hudson said...

The zebra has been a favourite of mine or a long time. I love stripes. . .and zoological exhibits too. I only got to read a few of your posts, Hilary, but those I did see were fantastic as usual. I will come back to read more - if you include a link to them in your sidebar or a tab. (was busy here having new toilet installed for hubs, then fridge needed replacing. . .and etc.)

D.G. Hudson said...

Oh yes, just saw the Archives links there. So I will be back to read more.

Courtney Turner said...

The zebra must have been so striking back then, with the black and white stripes. So exotic from a horse. Amazing that the painter was able to capture the details so well. All this before the days of photography. Congrats on Z - end! https:// Maui Jungalow

Nas said...

Yay, you've done the whole series so well. All interesting and informative posts.

Sara C. Snider said...

That painting is lovely. Quite interesting to see a zebra in a forest type setting. Congrats on finishing A to Z! :D

A to Z 2017: Magical and Medicinal Herbs

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Gail – thanks so much; I try and use images that relate to the post … the Cape Mountain Zebras are a delight to see and Zedland is just a wonderful name …

@ Senco – thanks so much … I enjoy looking around and I learnt so much about the RBST and generally bringing relevant knowledge together to do the write ups … commenting is important in the blogging arena – so I join in …

@ Lenny – well done, lovely to see you here and I could have put our Zdena in … but then I’d have lots of explaining to do … she does appear, if anyone is interested in my Z post of the 2013 Aspects of British Cookery series; she is an ardent follower of the wine god, Bacchus: he who will be much loved this week!

@ Joanne – just delighted you enjoyed each post and my voice about each subject came over … and that you had fun touring the UK with me …

@ Nila – thanks so much … the Queen’s zebra at the time, and the elephant and all the other animals were in menageries in Britain at that time and were becoming more accessible (or known about) to the population …

Museology – I’d never come across the term … so this is fascinating to know that the positions are appointed and exist today …

Your posts on Arabiana were quite extraordinary … and I’m going to have an enjoyable time reading them, looking at the wonderful snippets of video and hearing the music – gorgeous.

@ DG – zebras are special aren’t they, and stripes … as too zoos – at least if they are in a zoo today, animals are nurtured (usually, I have to say …). Thanks for thinking of coming back and reading through … when you have a few moments in between looking after your husband … with thoughts in that direction …

@ Courtney – Menageries were around for centuries … but more and more wealthy aristocrats could afford one – and so they were more easily available to the populace to see live and in person …

@ Nas – thanks so much … it was a fun series to write up, from which I learnt too …

@ Sara –yes the setting is a little strange – certainly not something the zebra would have seen in their African savannah lands …

Thanks to you all for visiting and participating with me in the A-Z, which makes the whole thing so worthwhile and encouraging … cheers Hilary

DeeDee said...

Thank you for such lovely, informative posts.

Also, Thank you for regularly dropping by my blog. Congrats on finishing the A to Z Challenge. Every post was wonderful

A to Z Reflections: Looking Back In Time

Susan Scott said...

Zo, we come to an end of the challenge. Many congratulations on your always lovely and interesting posts on animals. How special to end with te zebra - which along with the elephant is my favourite. Have a lovely public holiday ...

Trudy said...

You posted so many wonderful things during the A to Z Challenge, and I learned a great deal. Thank you! And congratulations for completing the challenge!

Trudy @ Reel Focus
Food in Film: Zagnut

cleemckenzie said...

Zebras are such beautiful animals. I loved reading about the one who lived in Buckingham and the Tower, but always prefer to see these wild creatures in their own natural setting. Hope that setting lasts and lasts.

M. Denise C. said...

Cheers, Hilary! I certainly enjoyed your topic this year and look forward to next year's challenge! I have to say that your blog posts are better read at your website rather than on a reader due to your fabulous colors and design of the posts. I truly learned a lot about the animals in the UK! Cheers, Denise

Nick Wilford said...

I had heard there was a zoo or menagerie at the Tower of London - in fact, I probably learnt that at this very blog. It's certainly had varied uses! Never knew there was a field of study for museums, but it makes sense. Thanks for some wonderfully informative posts this April.

Sharon M Himsl said...

Zebras in UK? Now that's a surprise. Great finale to the a-z, Hilary!

Kim Blades said...

Lovely post and very different to anyone else's entry on Zebras.

Cynthia Rodrigues Manchekar said...

Zebras are fascinating. I always wonder -- is it black on white or white on black?
Congratulations on finishing the challenge successfully.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ DeeDee – just glad you enjoyed the theme and posts and it’s a pleasure to pop in and say ‘hello’!

@ Susan – thanks for the support during the Challenge and your ideas on Aging –made me think and I’ll be back to re-read a few.

Just delighted you enjoyed the trawl through some of the Rare Breeds of Britain – fascinating we had zebra in the UK in the late 1800s into 1900s … and another thing I’ll mention in my Reflections post

Africa is definitely in my blood – elephant stories too – they are magnificent creatures …

@ Trudy – delighted you enjoyed reading and learning from my posts … finishing the challenge is a credit to us all …

@ Lee – oh I agree wild animals should be in the wild and allowed to roam free – sadly humans seem to come first … but there are parks in our western lands: but the best are in their true setting …

@ Denise – thanks so much for visiting and being there when you were travelling; then also that feedback comment re reading the posts on a machine rather than on a mobile. I’m just glad I rarely look at things on a mobile or even ipad … but I’m delighted you learnt a lot about our rare breeds.

@ Nick – yes there were a few menageries around in the 1800s – I’ll do a note in my Reflections post on them. I can reliable say I’d never heard of a Museologist – hence the term had to go in … and then Nila said she had a museologist in her family … strange but true!

@ Sharon – I know: zebras in the UK, and I’ve just learnt something else – a-waiting the Reflections post … thanks

@ Kim – thank you … I enjoy being different, not intentional just my nature apparently!

@ Cynthia – well that’s a question you will need to answer yourself (or perhaps I will!) … B on W, or W on B … but thank you for the thanks …

Cheers to you all, congratulations on participating in the A-Z and completing it, but importantly thank you so much for all your pertinent, relevant and valuable comments … they make the Challenge … all the best – Reflections coming up … Hilary

Arlee Bird said...

Another great job doing the A to Z! You amaze me with all the information you present us in your posts. Congratulations on completing the 2017 Challenge and thank you for participating in another one.

Arlee Bird
Tossing It Out

Sarah Zama said...

Congratulation for finishing the challenge, Hilary. YOurs was definitelly one of the most unique themes I've seen ;-)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lee - thanks so much ... I just like to give content and photos I'd like to see and read about - I teach myself as I go along ...

@ Sarah - delighted you enjoyed the posts and theme - it was certainly interesting for the author too ... !!

Cheers Hilary

Inger said...

As always your A to Z was wonderful. I didn't catch it all, but what I did read was interesting, well thought out and researched. Thank you for a great A to Z.

Pamela Wright said...

I've learnt so much in April from your posts Hilary, so thank you for the education. Not far from where we used to live in England was the Tring Natural History Museum - the Victorian gentleman who set it up used to have two zebras to pull his carriage when he travelled around - very eccentric.
Well done in completing the challenge.

Pamela @ Days of Fun

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Inger - many thanks - it's just good to see you back blogging when you feel like it. The good thing about a blog - is it is here for further reading when the thought occurs ... it's just lovely you're here ...

@ Pamela - delighted and good to meet you up in your Highland home ... maybe not up here, but down on the sea with the Highland backdrop - I enjoyed the Scotland tour.

Yes I've visited Tring and have on occasions written about Walter Rothschild, who had always wanted a museum from the age of 7, and his zebras ... he was a man of the times - but with a great sense of what needed to be done ... hence the museum.

Cheers to you both - lovely having you here - Hilary

Sharon M Himsl said...

Hi Hilary. Good for you spending time to answer our umpteen number of questions! I asked about the tarring too. Eight or nine miles a day sure is a lot! I guess they needed the protection, but I hope the process wasn't painful. I keep imagining what a noisy day that must have been, and then watching them march to town. Thank you for the update!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Sharon - thanks for commenting ... I know this should be under my Q+A post that I did recently ... but has popped up here. The tar would have been warmed to melt it - and I too hope wasn't too hot for their feet. I guess poultry farming could often be noisy ... especially back then ... cheers Hilary