Friday, 24 September 2021

We are the World Blogfest #53 Being able to Stem Bleeding from Stab Wound …

 

This UK entry is in the international James Dyson Award category … the shortlist will be announced in October … regardless, I think that this invention will be taken up by the medical world, particularly first responders.

 

Rapid Emergency Actuating Tamponade

The React (Rapid Emergency Actuating Tamponade) device is undergoing medical testing and could so easily save hundreds of lives a year – in so many parts of the world – once it is approved.

 

 

Joseph Bentley from the University of Loughborough is the young inventor … and leads the continued development of this product …

 

Wound management is notoriously difficult, while the patient needs urgent help - the normal process is slow, and worse for the patient very painful.  The React has been proved to stop the bleeding from knife wounds quickly … while it is also suitable for wounds in cavities like the abdomen.

 

There’s a simple application procedure, whereby the device is automated inflated … the Tamponade can be in place and stop haemorrhage in under a minute – a life saver.

 

We are the World Blogfest

In Darkness, Be Light

 

Here's the link – with full details, a video and some images … please take a look.



Hilary Melton-Butcher

Positive Letters Inspirational Stories


46 comments:

Hels said...

Is this new device expensive? Does it need a medical degree to operate it? Where would the React be kept when it is not being used?

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Hels - thanks for the comment ... I don't know - as it's in development ... the link will give you a lot of detail. Hope you can find your answers there. Cheers Hilary

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
The link is faulty, Hilary - just loops back to your own blog.
This is the one you want.
I was very interested to read this, as there has been a new first aid manoeuvre developed by an Australian doctor to stem blood flow in the case of shark attack. Purely manual, but equally as effective and timely. This is clearly a growing field of need in emergency! YAM xx

Joanne said...

wow - that is quite innovative.
And I admit when I saw your blog title, I wondered, "What kind of story did she write?" I figured you had a fiction entry that was going to dark places i.e. stabbing?!! Boy, was I fooled.

Diane said...

Sounds brilliant but the link does not work. Cheers Diane

David M. Gascoigne, said...

There are defibrillators all over the place, but I have never seen one used. Will it possibly be the same with this device? I am quite sure that if I were in a situation where I felt the need to break into the defibrillator compartment, retrieve the device, read the instructions and apply it properly, the unfortunate person needing the treatment would be dead! I suspect it might be true of this device too, Hilary.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

That would be a lifesaver.

Pam Lazos said...

That's wild, Hilary! I wonder if they got the idea from the tampon!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Yam – thanks so much … hadn’t realised – I’ve now corrected it … have been at a committee and group meeting – hence delay.

There’s an amazing amount of scientific developments going on … I love finding out about them. This clever medical device just caught me … so needed to write about it. I remember the Rhodesian army in the 1970s using tampons in the wars – but on looking at Joseph Bentley’s website … detailed via the link I’ve now corrected! So the details can be seen about the dangers of plugging wounds …

@ Joanne – thank you … shows you – the title is important … but great it fooled you, yet informed you …

@ Diane – the link works now – thanks for the interest … it reminded me of the Rhodesian army using tampons back in the 1970s …

@ David – yes we have defibrillators in a great many places in the country … and I’m sure all security guards, teachers, auxiliary helpers, ambulance workers, medical advisers etc will all know how they work and where they’re located within their jurisdiction. I don’t think we’d be required to use one – I know I definitely couldn’t …

I think these Tamponades will only be held by appropriate public service workers … not out available for general use. I’m fairly sure this would be the case.

@ Alex – yes definitely a life safer – so many are being stabbed.

@ Pam – thanks, I so agree … as I mentioned above … I remember tampons being used by the Rhodesian army – but on looking at the website ‘stuffing’ a wound can also cause further problems … it’s an interesting read.

Thanks everyone – apologies for the mess up of the link – now corrected … I’d highly recommend everyone reading the concisely written website – fascinating … all the best - Hilary

bazza said...

The devise does seem to be dependant upon having skilled users available but it could prove to be something that will saves many lives. Well done Joseph Bentley!
CLICK HERE for Bazza’s cautiously craven Blog ‘To Discover Ice’

Pradeep Nair said...

This sounds like a real lifesaver! Great story.

cleemckenzie said...

This sounds like something paramedics will welcome with glee!

Elephant's Child said...

Sadly the images didn't show up in my reader this morning but what an amazing invention. Literally a life saver.

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

Interesting

Susan Scott said...

Great innovation Hilary. Well done to James Dyson for this REACT. Would be great if the knife stabbings would decrease :) I had no problem with the link. Thanks for this post for #WATWB ... have a lovely weekend.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Bazza - great to see you ... but it'll be in the hands of medics/rapid responders and I'm sure well trained. As you say well done to Joseph.

@ Pradeep - thanks ... it definitely fits an #WATWB post theme ... your lung transplant post is amazing too ...

@ Lee - yes ... I hope it will get approval from the authorities quickly - but it will get lots of exposure being part of the James Dyson award process, which should definitely help.

@ EC - I sent you another link via email - which I hope works. However you could at least see its value ...

@ Jo-Anne - thank you

@ Susan - it's amazing isn't it. I was just thinking that these award programmes highlighting innovators in the scientific world - I've promoted another of James Dyson's category entrants a while ago on 'Fish Scale Bioplastic' in September 2019.

Thanks - yes if we could at least help those who are stabbed more easily live on ... I corrected the link - but good to know you got it to work.

Cheers everyone - I love these #WATWB posts ... all the best - Hilary

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

While it's sad that such a device is needed at all I can only applaud the inventor. Needs to come up with a better name for it though!

Jacqui Murray said...

That sounds amazing, Hilary. Tourniquets only go so far and lots of people are nervous about applying them. Thanks for this.

Keith's Ramblings said...

Never has such a device been needed as much as now. Stabbings happen so frequently these days that many don't even make the national news.

Inger said...

This would save lives for sure and has become sadly necessary in today's world. Hilary, you are an amazing woman. You always come up with new and interesting things to post on your blog. I remember your blog from many years ago, your mom, the knitting, the visits and the love you shared. Since then the variety of subjects that interest you show up here. You never know what it will be. But you know for sure it will always be different, always stimulating, and always fun.

Sandra Cox said...

Wow. I've never heard of that. I would never be an EMT. Other than writing about them, blood, slices and I do not get along. I highly respect EMTers and other first line responders.

Liz A. said...

Wow. Very cool.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ John – yes, people really shouldn’t need to carry knives around as a weapon on our streets. I think now Joseph is the UK contestant in the Dyson awards … there’ll be lots of interest and guidance as to getting the device to market, as too a name change, perhaps …

@ Jacqui – the website was very enlightening as to the challenges re stemming the flow of blood from a wound – I found it fascinating …

@ Keith – isn’t that so true – we need this device to come to market as soon as possible …

@ Inger – thank you so much … I just keep my eyes open for things that interest me and I hope will interest anyone who reads here – great bloggers are wonderful to have around.

I have to laugh at ‘the knitting’!! – I hate it … but rather wish I could do it … I also am allergic to wool – so all in all not for me!

I’m just delighted you enjoy visiting … I have a Swedish artist to write about soon … thanks so much for your support …

@ Sandra – it’s in development now – and once the contest is happening, the medical and scientific world will take note … so I’m sure it’ll be available for all medical responders as soon as it can be.

@ Liz – yes … it’s a great idea isn’t it.

Thanks to you all for coming by – always so happy to see your comments – have good weeks – cheers Hilary

retirementreflections said...

I love learning about new inventions like this, and greatly respect and admire their inventors. Thanks for sharing this -- very inspiring!

Dan said...

This is such a great idea!

Nilanjana Bose said...

That sounds brilliant! Hope it can be made available at a reasonable cost when upscaled for commercialisation. So many inventions turn out to be too expensive for all but the rich..

Chrys Fey said...

Oh wow. What an amazing invention. It amazes me what people can create that saves lives.

Yolanda Renée said...

Interesting and needed device. Would save a lot of lives. I love that you share the knowledge you acquire. Always such interesting information!

Always teaching, thanks Hilary!

Tyrean Martinson said...

REACT sounds like a wonderful, life-saving device!

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

What an amazing and useful development! Thanks for sharing it with us, Hilary!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Donna - thanks ... I just thought it's wonderful to know it's being put up for the James Dyson international award as it'll gain a lot more traction and hopefully get more publicity ...

@ Dan - isn't it ... wonderful prototype ...

@ Nila - it'll be for medics and first responders and similar ... so it won't be commercial I don't think ... it'll be authorised and regulated.

Thanks so much to you three - cheers Hilary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Chrys, yes – amazing invention … as well as a design development … to help so many …

@ Renee – such an important new invention … and yes lots of lives will be saved. Thanks … I enjoy the shares and then the reaction of commenters …

@ Tyrean – thanks … I’m sure once it gets to market – REACT seems to be a wonderful tool on the way to being publicly available.

@ Elizabeth – pleasure … I always enjoy sharing these sorts of positive inventions and ideas here …

Thanks for being here – always good to read everyone’s comments – cheers Hilary

D.G. Kaye said...

What a fantastic idea. Great share Hilary. I have to imagine these will become a staple in the medical profession in a short time to come. Hugs xx

Vallypee said...

Ab amazing invention with the potential to save thousands of lives. Fantastic. Thank you for posting it, Hilary!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Debby - it is amazing isn't it ... and I'm sure once the awards are over - they'll go into full steam ahead for approval, testing and product ...

@ Val - as you say an amazing invention - which will help so many around the world.

Being at the Dyson Awards will open up the world's eyes to the invention. So pleased the two of you enjoyed reading about this incredible product - cheers Hilary

Sandra Cox said...

You find the most amazing things to write about:)
Take special care.
Cheers,

Shannon Lawrence said...

What a great and important invention! That could make a difference for many people.

Sandra Cox said...

Have a lovely day and evening, Hils.

Michael Di Gesu said...

This sounds AMAZING! Imagine all the lives it will save. I know it still needs approval, but hopefully, this will be approved soon.

Thanks for sharing, Hilary. I hope all is well with you! Stay safe!

Deniz Bevan said...

Wow, that sounds like an amazing invention! I've been rereading all the Outlander books, and just thinking of the way wounds have been treated over the centuries really helps me to realise how amazing this new invention could be!

A Cuban In London said...

That's a fantastic invention. Thanks for the link.

Greetings from London.

Sandra Cox said...

I wonder what material they use.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sandra – thank you for your various comments and thoughts … I do enjoy finding interesting items to write up and from which I learn so much …

@ Shannon – yes I’m sure once this invention gets out it’ll be hugely helpful …

@ Michael – good to see you … and yes it will be amazing once it’s regulated and available to medics …

@ Deniz – yes … I too thought ‘wow’. The Outlander series is a great read and thinking about wounds over the centuries or millennia would be interesting to learn about. The website was interesting …

@ ACIL – so good to see you … and isn’t it a fantastic invention – glad you appreciated the link.

Thanks everyone – so pleased you enjoyed learning about this invention – all the best - Hilary

Sandra Cox said...

Just stopped by to say hey. Hope you're having a great one.

Inger said...

I hope this is a device that eventually anyone could own. Accidents happen in all of our lives and using this seeems to be something one could failry easily learn. I may be wrong, of course, and I haven't read any comments or your replies to them, Hilary, so I'm just guessing here. Have a lovely rest of the week, my friend.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Sandra ...

Hi Inger - I would think it will only be available to medics and people of that ilk ... it could easily be abused. But until it's on the market - it's only a guess.

I'd expect if anyone in the home was injured there'd be enough time to get them to hospital, or for a first responder to arrive and deal with the wound, as they'd have the device on board. The link about wound management makes for a very informative read.

Thanks to you both - all the best Hilary