Friday, 29 April 2022

We are the World Blogfest - #WATWB Hmb#1 – Vitiligo …

 As I'm continuing on with interesting, positive ideas … I'd spotted this article, and having decided that it's my continuance #WATWB Hmb#1 post … I thought I'd better find out more … and am found lamentable.

Hmb #1

Martin Senkubuge, from Uganda, is a young very talented artist … particularly adept at painting skin tones … displays the beauty of every skin in his drawings, using art to fight the stigma that surrounds vitiligo ...


... he is a hyperrealism artist, some of his works are identical to the photography that inspires them.



An example of Vitiligo

Vitiligo is a skin condition, caused by lack of melanin pigment, which leads to white patches on the skin or hair …




understandably it can cause considerable emotional distress, particularly if it develops during childhood.




Martin showing a sponsor his art piece of
Isaac Kyoyeta, an events manager, in Kampala
In Africa people with Vitiligo face the added burden of being seen as “cursed” or “bewitched” … rebuffed and with the likelihood of becoming isolated within their communities …



I was shocked to learn that Michael Jackson had Vitiligo … I'd no idea … but I don't spend my time reading about celebrities – I'll skip usually, occasionally scan, information if it catches my eye … I knew Jackson had skin problems – but had no idea why … shame on me …


Isaac Kyoyeta's 'portrait'


Senkubuge having realised (see story in article link), decided to find out more, and thus about Vitiligo …





This knowledge affected Senkubuge … he now researches more, before he makes a judgement about an aspect of life. (He was judged and found wanting, as I'd been ... on reading about the artist himself) …


Senkubuge's 'Barrister':
Charcoal, Acrylic, Fabric and
Sand on Canvas (2020)
This 73 year old barrister - too young
to retire! supports artists and fights
for the rights of the uneducated and 
less privileged in our societies.



In September 2019, he founded the Part of Us Initiative, a visual campaign of creating awareness about the Vitiligo skin condition and other humanitarian causes in Uganda, Africa and the rest of the world – it's on Facebook, which I don't do …





The main objective is to visually amplify and raise Vitiligo voices, fight against stereotypes and stigma, and embrace Vitiligo as a natural and normal skin condition … getting the word out will help.



Eve Atukunda, 31, who has had 
Vitiligo since a child, was drawn by
Martin Senkubuge for an exhibition
to tackle the stigma of the condition.



I'm sure we will all be more aware of that condition … and be more empathetic in our approach to life …







We are the World Blogfest

In Darkness, Be Light


Peace and Compassion for Ukraine

and a happier world for us all in the years ahead



In this magazine article - you can read Martin Senkubuge's story ... and find the colourful side of Vitigilo - Monitor Magazine, Uganda.


Goethe-Zentrum - Centre for Art and Media


In 2019, his Vitiligo art project won a small grant worth $560 from Goethe-Zentrum Kampala after his concept was considered as unique and brilliant.


Since 2020, he has been running a campaign of inclusiveness for the pride of people living with Vitiligo in Uganda.



His inaugural Vitiligo Art Exhibition, Part of Us, was held last year at Goethe Zentrum Kampala's office – it was a showcase of his Vitiligo Art Project.


Daily Art Magazine on Martin Senkubuge ... 


PS - an interesting aside ... Blogger put a few of your comments into spam - yes!  Strange but true ... thank you - they're rescued ... 


Hilary Melton-Butcher

Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

40 comments:

Hels said...

Any skin condition can be humiliating, but if it is on the bum, stomach or inner thighs, few family or friends will ever know about it.

But on the face Vitiligo stands out so clearly that even perfect strangers will avert their eyes. Neither infectious nor fatal, which is great, but no cure either :(

Elephant's Child said...

Thank you.
I knew about Vitiligo, but had never considered the stigma attached. Which I should have. My bad.

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari OM
My friend has vitiligo on her hands. For some time she kept them in pockets or pulled her sleeves down. Folk were more bothered by her stretched clothes than the discolouration so now she gets on with things. Thanks for this article, Hilary! YAM xx
Y=Yamini

mail4rosey said...

There is a big campaign company who hired someone who appears to have this, as their poster girl. I can't remember who it was (some big beauty place) but I thought it was awesome.

David M. Gascoigne, said...

One might be forgiven for thinking that prejudice on the basis of skin colour might have been overcome by the 21st century, but I am afraid not. It makes you wonder whether we are even capable of changing our view of such natural events. When one sees a world full of ongoing racism and discrimination and individuals like Putin capable of triggering nuclear Armageddon, it is hard to have faith in the future of humanity. Hugs from moi à toi, Hilary.

Joanne said...

You've shed light on another - always a good thing. If only people didn't concentrate on differences, but instead looked for similarities - the world might be a nicer place. Enjoy your Friday and have a good weekend

Inger said...

I admire you for alwasy finding important issues to post on your blog. One can only imagine how difficult it would be for a child or a teenager with this condition.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Hels - yes ... skin conditions are so challenging, especially those seen by others. Vitiligo must be very difficult to deal with ... and as you say with no cure ...

@ Rosey - I can see that happening ... a campaign using someone who has this affliction ... and if it was Eve Atukunda - I can see why ... extraordinary bone sculpture ... I agree these images, art works, photos really bring the affliction to light ...

@ David - I know ... it's a sorry world we live in where skin afflictions, or damages, or other prejudices have not been eliminated in the 21st century ...

Putin - is another story ...I just sincerely hope we can all find peace ... but thank you for your hugs - mine are sent over the ocean!

@ Joanne - This artist and his approach to the affliction has been a joy to read - but you've highlighted ... if only we could agree and understand others' points of view - life would be so much easier.

@ Inger - thank you ... I enjoy bringing these sorts of posts to the blogging world ... but you're right teenagers and children would really suffer ...

Thank you so much for coming by and commenting - if only we would think and look at things from the other person's point of view ... have peaceful weekends - Hilary

Liz A. said...

I knew Michael Jackson had a skin condition, but I didn't know what it was called. Scary that some thought they had been bewitched. Yikes.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC - yes I was surprised ... how little I knew and embarrassed that I hadn't realised ...

@ Yam - yes ... I think it is getting on with it ... and also talking about it - so people appreciate and understand what's people can have, or get ...

@ Liz - I realised there was something wrong with MJ ... but hadn't realised it was Vitigilo ... but in Africa - there are still the witch doctors to be considered ... sad ...

Thanks so much - great to see you here - all the best - Hilary

Sandra Cox said...

Everyone has some physical issue to deal with. Vitiligo would be a tough one, wouldn't it?
YOU have a great weekend.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

His artwork is amazing. I'd seen people with the white patchy skin and had no idea it was a condition or unusual.

John Holton said...

Some of us thought MJ was having his skin lightened....

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sandra - yes ... you're right we all have odds and ends that we'd rather not show in public ... while as you say Vitiliglo must be one of the very difficult ones.

@ Alex - I agree his artwork is exceptional ... and like you I'd no idea about the condition: Vitiliglo ...

@ John - I'd heard MJ was having his skin lightened ... and I'm somewhat surprised the media didn't let us know about the condition - which certainly would help our understanding ...

Thanks so much to you all - I'm glad I've brought this subject to the attention of anyone who comments here - cheers Hilary

Dan said...

Kudos to you for continuing the WATWB spirit, Hilary. I think the answer to so many of society’s problems waould be for people to know more about them. Let compassion and understanding rule the day.

Have a wonderful weekend.

Anabel Marsh said...

So Blogger is just as contrary as WordPress!

Jo-Anne's Ramblings said...

What a horrible condition for someone to have, I have heard of it before.

retirementreflections said...

I'm ashamed to admit that I had not heard of vitiligo before. Thank you for sharing it, and the stigma/emotional turmoil that it has caused. Your posts always give me so much to think about.

Anstice Brown said...

What incredible artwork. It must be very difficult to live with a skin condition like vitiligo when people are so quick to make judgments based on appearance. I think it's beautiful and hope the stigma disappears in the future now that models, artists and celebrities are raising awareness of it.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Dan - thank you ... I'm always finding interesting positive things going on - so this seemed a good post to start with. Though I totally believe you're right about us needing to be more aware of things and then we'd understand others, or think before we open our mouths to speak - as you say 'Let compassion and understanding rule the day'.

@ Anabel - well I suppose 'it' (blogger) thought these might be real spam comments - but I am always flummoxed at the vagaries of the internet. So I guess we both suffer ...

@ Jo-Anne - thank you ...

@ Donna - yes I was ashamed I hadn't realised about Vitigilo before ... and particularly that it hadn't been highlighted by the media as much as it could have been re Michael Jackson ... I'm just glad my posts give friends something to think about ...

@ Anstice - yes the artwork is exceptional isn't it ... giving their Vitigilo beauty ... and yes now that artists, models and celebrities are highlighting the natural disease ... it should be more acceptable ...

Thanks to you all for your comments - cheers Hilary

Pradeep Nair said...

That's a great project, Hilary. And thank you for sharing this.
One can understand what people with vitiligo undergo, and they need all support.
Thank you so much for reading my posts all through April. Really appreciate.
Take care.
-- Pradeep from Time and Tide

Keith's Ramblings said...

You've covered a subject that many of us are aware of but have not given much thought to. Once again I leave your blog wiser than when I arrived!

D.G. Kaye said...

Great share Hilary. One of my new friends I met in Mexico has this on his hands, also sensitive to sun, the unpigmented parts. And yes, sad about the end of WATWB. Glad to see you still sharing interesting stories. Hugs 🧡

Damyanti Biswas said...

Beautiful theme! Beautiful initiative :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lynda Dietz said...

It's amazing to me that people still stigmatize physical differences they perceive as abnormal. They may be atypical, but there's no single standard of beauty, so I'm not sure where people get the idea of what's "right." That said, I do feel for those who have been "othered" by it, and I appreciate this post for teaching us about such a terrific artist. When I was in grade school, one of our friends had a port-wine stain that covered fully half of her face, and though I remember being surprised the first time I saw it, it was never a big deal to those of us who knew her. I'm sure it wasn't easy for her in our small town, though, because people can be cruel.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Pradeep - yes ... I was surprised to read about Vitiligo and so was happy to post here in my new #WATWB #Hmb posts - they do need support and awareness by us all.

Pleasure re the A-Z ... well done on joining in the Challenge.

@ Keith - thank you ... yes I must say I knew people in Africa with the condition, but never found out about it ... so I was pleased to find out more, and especially about the artist Martin Senkubuge - who I found totally inspirational ...

@ Debby - how interesting one of your new friends suffers from this condition - there must be so many, now I think about it - as this post has made me do.

The #WATWB postings I so enjoyed ... and I'll continue on - it seems commenters will be happy to read.

@ Damyanti - you started us off on the #WATWB monthly postings ... once I settled in to the sentiment of them - I've appreciated seeing everyone's entries ... and now will be able to keep my ideas alive here ...

@ Lynda - yes, I guess, it's lack of educative information ... and as you say by now - you think we'd understand more and think there might be a condition that causes some of the things we haven't thought about.

So pleased you enjoyed the post ... Senkubuge is such a talented artist and on top of that has an empathetic mind in that he's helping promote the condition in a positive light. I'm sure as one spends time with people and gets to know them ... these apparent disfigurements 'disappear' in our brains and they are, as we know them, 'humans' like us. People can be cruel ... but again it's lack of education and how we treat people ... adults need to do better!

Thanks so much for visiting and endorsing my continuance of these posts ... cheers Hilary

H.R. Sinclair said...

Have you heard of or seen Winnie Harlow? She a beautiful model with vitiligo. I think her being so visible has been good, hopefully helping others with it.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Holly - I hadn't heard of or seen Winnie Harlow ... and having looked I can see she is stunning, even with Vitiligo - and I'd noted that some celebrities were bringing the subject to the fore ... thank you for introducing her to us. I too hope that the subject will be more acceptable to people ... cheers Hilary

Sandra Cox said...

Senkubuge is an amazing artist, isn't he? And good on him for shining a light on this skin condition.

diedre Knight said...

Another wonderful post, Hilary! And so worth sharing. If you don't mind I'll share this on my website streampebbles.com

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sandra - thank you ... I was amazed at his artistic ability ... let alone taking on the aspect of the condition ... by bringing it to the notice of the public - which has also been recognised.

@ Diedre - I'd be delighted if you'd share it with your website: streampebbles.com - a pleasure ... as it's a condition that needs to be brought to our attention and for us to be aware of ...

Excellent to see both of you - cheers Hilary

Sherry Ellis said...

I know some people with this skin condition. I can imagine how difficult it was for them to grow up and look different from everyone else.

Lynda R Young as Elle Cardy said...

Skin is just skin, but that doesn't stop the unfortunate stigmas attached to anyone considered "different".

Denise Covey said...

Hi Hilary. As always a truly inspiring article about something I knew so little of. Maybe being inflicted with this unfortunate condition is a reason behind some of Jackson's quirks. Would not have been easy for him growing up.

Michael Di Gesu said...

Hi Hilary!

I knew of this condition and the trauma these individuals have to endure. Sigh. People are so ignorant and cruel. Thankfully, there are people like you that try and educate others about this condition. Your posts are always inspiring and educational!

Marja said...

First off all thank you to take me up straight away after a period of absence So happy to be back and read your blog again. I never heard about this condition and thanks for raising awareness. Sad that people are such judgemental creatures. Without thatlife would be so much easier

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sherry - yes I suspect we all do, especially if we think about it. It shows in their eyes ... so difficult, as you say ...

@ Lynda - exactly skin is just skin ... but it's that visual impact - which we're not good at acknowledging that it doesn't make any difference to the person themselves ...

@ Denise - thank you .. just finding out about Senkubuge was inspiring ... so I was pleased to write a post about Vitiliglo - I'm glad readers have appreciated the post ...

@ Michael - thank you for your comment and support for sufferers, as well as my type of posts ...

@ Marja - pleasure to read your poems. Excellent that I've enlightened you about this minor condition, but debilitating in the mind for sufferers ... thank you for realising we are judgemental creatures ...

Thank you so much to you all for appreciating the post about this condition - all the best - Hilary

Sandra Cox said...

Hope you're having a great one, Hils.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Thanks Sandra - all well ... just busy! Cheers Hilary