Tuesday 11 June 2024

D-day and world pain: 'Weltschmerz' ...

 

As it was D-day and I was remembering my parents who were 19 or 20 at the beginning of the war and 24 or 25 at the end … my father's birthday being at this time of year.


Melancholy - 1891


So in these tempestuous times … I wondered how to title the post … then frustratingly after the internet went down for nigh on 24 hours ...



… just when I needed it to be up and running for work that needed to get done, the ideal title for this post courtesy of Big Think appearedlink also below ... 


Suits me … melancholy at this time, yet uplifting as we're so fortunate to be alive and well … we all have our ups and downs …


Anxiety (1894)


... while in the last 80 years – since the end of the 2nd World War - which was meant to be the end of all wars … discord never stopped and perhaps more so now as there's the non-stop news, social media traction – all of which add to people's insecurity …



... so rightly described in this article … where reality often doesn't live up to people's ideals and expectations.


Separation (1896)
I was going to include photos of three churches I visited recently ... covering 1,000 years of history - including many skirmishes, conflicts, war-mongering peoples ... locals and invaders ... but that can wait ... weltschmerz is more suitable ... 


An Optimist and a Pessimist by the
Russian artist Vladimir Makovsky (1893)

World Pain - unfairly affects the poor, the disenfranchised ... it also applies to our communities ... especially in these days of the 21st century ... 



As the BigThink article mentions … we can soften our weltschmerz by keeping our positivity out there, and refusing to be dulled by others … our spirits need to be up … 


Syrian girl in Istanbul ... looking wistful 
but with hope ... 

... we can all do it, I know we can … all those little positive actions, optimistic thoughts add up giving us a more generous view of life.



Big Think article: The upside of feeling dissatisfied with the world: How to work your "weltschmerz".

Please note unless mentioned the art is by Edvard Munch (1863 - 1944) - his Melancholy is the one chosen by Big Think to illustrate their article.  


Hilary Melton-Butcher

Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

18 comments:

Yamini MacLean said...

Hari Om
The effect of the conflicts raging now do have an influence on the whole world and we all are victims of those troubles, albeit several countries removed. To ignore this fact is to fail ourselves and the people around us. YAM xx

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

We need to be the light the world needs.

Rita said...

World weariness...yes. Oh, yes.
So there is a word for this feeling that wears on the soul.
I grab moments of joy wherever I can. :)

Computer Tutor said...

I continue to honor how much so many gave to bring peace and kindness to the world. I'm not a Macron fan, but was impressed with how respectfully he honored those veterans of D-Day. Talk soon.

Debbie D. said...

"Lest We Forget"... I fear the younger generations will not carry on the memories of what happened in the world wars. It warmed my heart to see all the various D-Day commemoration ceremonies here in North America and in Europe. Sadly, the world has not learned much from the past, as the current conflicts rage on. 'Weltschmerz' indeed! It behooves us to remain optimistic, but reality keeps intruding...

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Yam - so much conflict at the moment ... some suppressed which we don't see. As you say to ignore is to fail ourselves ... we always need to remember others.

@ Alex - yes we do need to be the light the world needs ...

@ Rita - world weariness - yes as the article describes - but we all have our 'down' times ... and like you I grab joy as and when I can ...

@ Jacqui - just enjoy the time with your sister ... yes we do see great leaders set examples ... thank goodness for our veterans ...

@ Debbie - yes I noticed there were a lot of commemorations going on ... and that they were well organised and held respectfully; I like your comment re "weltshcmerz" ... a wonderful word, I thought ...

Cheers to you five - thanks for commenting - Hilary

Elephant's Child said...

Oh yes. This post strikes a chord. And as you know, I do always try and find beauty and solace in life. If only we had learned from that 'last war'...

Liz A. said...

It's hard when the world seems to be in such a mess. But I'll try...

Joanne said...

Thank you for this post and such a good word that sorta sounds like what it is. World Pain is a smertz on the soul. I have to remind myself that bad news is what is dramatic and gets the eyeballs reeling. We have to look to each other and the good things that happen amongst neighbors and friends. Our local YMCA is the epitome of good works, as is the library. And blog land is a sign of world goodness amongst readers and writers. Look at your international gathering just today. Chin up!

Anabel Marsh said...

It’s hard not to feel Weltschmerz at the moment.

jabblog said...

'Going to hell in a handcart' springs to mind. It's hard to find any optimism anywhere these days, but we'll keep trying . . .

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ EC - thank you ... it's striking a chord with me too - as I mull and process of what's going on. I'm sure most of us look for kindness and beauty, thankfully ...

@ Liz - thank you ... you're in a lovely area to live ... but also with hardships ...

@ Joanne - 'WorldPain' affects us all ... and is schmerz on the soul. As you note reporting of bad news is often the worst titling they can come up with to hold our attention ... I wish it wasn't like that too. We do have a YMCA in town - but it's for walkers ... while the Library certainly does its thing; there is help in the town. The best place to be is blog-land that's for sure ... as well as family and friends - one learns so much here ... my chin is always up - I'm exceedingly fortunate to say.

@ Anabel - sadly ... that is so ...

@ Janice - as you say 'going to hell in a handcart' - though the velocity seems way faster than a handcart! We're all going on with our lives as best we can ...

Thanks to you all - I do hope we can get out the other side of this 'Weltschmerz' soon ... take care and with thoughts - Hilary

L. Diane Wolfe said...

If there ever is another world war, it will be the war to end all things.

Diane said...

My Mums birthday is also this month she would have been 109. There will always be someone who wants something that belongs to someone else. Wars will never end and we can only hope that there will not be WW3. What with wars and AI humans will end up extinct and blowing everything up. Animals will once again rule the world! Have a good week. Cheers Diane

Sandra Cox said...

This is an excellent writerly word, Hils. Also a great post. There certainly is a lot of weltschmerz right now, isn't there?
Cheers....

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Diane - I know life is not easy at the moment ... let's hope we escape a world war ... as that's what it's likely to be ...

@ Diane - yes my Dad would have been a bit older - as you gathered via the post. It's extraordinary that one person can enforce others to do their will and then create 'havoc' for many others as those orders are acted on. I sincerely hope we don't have WW3.

Your comment about wars, AI and humans reacting has been at the forefront of my mulling mind recently ... we may well do exactly what you propose ... I just hope it won't happen - but the planet will probably be better off without us.

@ Sandra - yes the word was an appropriate one to come across - as a friend said the Germans had a way with philosophical words ... and, yes, weltschmerz rings true today ...

Cheers to you all - lovely to see you here - Hilary

David M. Gascoigne, said...

Thanks for this post, Hilary. I find solace and beauty every day in my life, but it's because of my immersion into the natural world. I am part of it, not estranged from it, and it gives me strength and bestows calm. Having said that it is hard to ignore current events and the drift towards fascism and ultra-nationalism, and the potential awful consequences of such a mindset. These are troubling times, but I guess that they always have been to one extent or another. The terrible spectre looming over all of us now, however, is the ability of civilizations to utterly destroy each other. It's not much of a stretch to imagine that it might happen.

hels said...

World War One was the war to end all wars, but we didn't learn much from that particular lesson :( Nor from World War Two, it seems :(