Tuesday, 7 April 2015

F is for Fly the Flag with Food, and Fish …



Fishing is essential to the Cornish way of life … it sustained the villagers in times of hardship, over winter, but is regarded as one of the two most dangerous occupations … mining being the other.


 
Cornish Flag of St Piran
Coastal fishing, and fishing at sea off the Cornish shoreline with its massive granite buttresses, seas and winds running toward them from the Atlantic Ocean without let or hindrance  … can be treacherous.




Edward Frederick Ertz -
Fishing at Polperro Harbour
(colour scan of the art work)


There are plenty of fish … some of the odder named ones … Coal Fish, Whiting Pout, the Flounder or Fluke, a Blonde Ray … but enough of Fish and I’m not going into the restrictions now in place for our Fishing Industries and the European Union.







Do I need to title it up?!

Food, food, glorious food … Cornwall has many delights … Cornish Cream – we know … the cream takes a couple of hours to gently cook – a time when cream makers could go off and surf.




Pasty Boys about 1880s

Pasties – the Pasty Boys down the mines – a staple of many a mining household … my mother was a brilliant maker of home-made pasties – I love them properly made!  My post here gives more information.


Yarg - wild garlic wrapped



Yarg cheese – nettle wrapped, or wild garlic wrapped … so Yarg!  Lynher Dairies near Truro – they are Cornish …






Exmoor Caviar, Cornish Salted


.. Cornish Caviar – now I see the reason for that name – it has been salted with Cornish Salt – hence its name ... a little far-fetched perhaps … but I’ll go with it!  It has a reallyinteresting entrepreneurial story to its creation …





Pinot Noir

Time for a drink?   How about a Pinot Noir from the Camel Valley … an entrepreneurial couple tried their luck, and did their research …  Unprepossessing photo ... 



Range of Meads from the Cornish Mead company

Or Mead – the drink for the festive at the festival … honey, fruit or liqueur … just decide which …


Sardines/Pilchards packed in
barrels for salting and storing


That is F for Flying the Flag with Food, and Fishing from the frolicking waves of the Cornish seas, yet fossicking refers to mining ... from Aspects of British Cornish …





Hilary Melton-Butcher

Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

54 comments:

Gattina said...

When I look at the scone with clotted cream, my mouth waters ! That and pasties I mostly ate when I was in Cornwall !

Deniz Bevan said...

Ooh, I'd love to try yarg!
We had a Cornish tea when we visited St Michael's Mount. Yum!
I wish I knew more about fish. I've never fished on the sea before...

Rosalind Adam said...

I wouldn't be a fisherman for anything, certainly not an old-fashioned type in a small boat and yes, the types of fish they used to eat were far more varied than our bland farmed offerings.

The last time we were in Cornwall we tried to buy some Cornish Yarg to take home as presents but we couldn't find any in any of the shops! Disappointing.

Nilanjana Bose said...

F for Falmouth, where the Maritime Museum is, and there was a film show we caught on pilchards. Fascinating.

Deborah Barker said...

Loving your Cornish themed A-Z Hilary. We are back down to our house in Cornwall at the weekend and I look forward to cream teas and maybe a Cornish pasty for lunch as well. Hope you are ocntinuing to heal! :-) X

Manzanita said...

The yarg cheese wrapped in nettle leaf really popped out at me. The dairy where it's made looks like it would be a neat place to visit.
That is a grand old picture of the boys eating their pasties.

Natasha Duncan-Drake said...

You've made me very hungry! I'd love to eat just about everything you've mentioned except the fish (I have a phobia of the bones - used to love the taste).
Tasha
Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

Sophie Duncan said...

Clotted cream, pasties and yarg - oo, yum (although not all at the same time ;P).
Sophie
Sophie's Thoughts & Fumbles
FB3X
Wittegen Press

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Gattina - I know when I see or think about Cornish Cream my mouth waters; the same with pasties .. when I think I should make some ..

@ Deniz - Yarg is delicious. I absolutely love fresh fish .. my mother and I always went down to the Harbour to get some fish, or crab when I was visiting ..

@ Ros - I agree I couldn't think about going out on one of those fishing vessels, let alone working as a fisherwoman. I've been mackerel fishing from Coverack in Cornwall .. but otherwise not done much. Sadly - food is farmed now isn't it - so much tastier if it's wild.

Sorry about the Yarg - it's not a rich area and there wouldn't be much demand .. it's available in Waitrose though ... not much good for your presents now ...

@ Nila - yes F for Falmouth .. and I did do F for the Fal under E ... so pleased you got to see the film show on pilchards - I bet it was interesting...

@ Debbie - oh lucky you - being down in Fowey ... and I bet you'll be having one or two cream teas and perhaps a pasty - even perhaps making them yourself?! Thanks re the healing .. all going well ...

@ Manzanita - Yarg cheese is delicious .. I'm now going to try the garlic wrapped one. It's a small local dairy ... but would be fascinating to visit, I agree. The pasty boys are wonderful aren't they ...

@ Natasha - I know it's lunch time now - and I'd quite like a decent lunch ... but I'll have my usual salad! Sorry to read about your fish bone phobia ...

@ Sophie - all good as far as I'm concerned ... but I agree each at different times to savour the flavours ...

Thanks everyone .. food for thought - cheers Hilary

T. Powell Coltrin said...

I've only tasted caviar once and as a teenager, I didn't care much for it. Perhaps, I'll try it again.

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

Suddenly very hungry! And that scone looks scrumptious!

Out on the prairie said...

Mining was big here for a long time, the coal became too soft. A huge limestone mine still going near me.Many families started in the industry. I would like to try the cheese, very interesting.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

I'll try the Pinot Noir but pass on the caviar.

Chrys Fey said...

That cream looks delicious! But the caviar made me cringe...I've never tried it before.

Margie said...

Hilary, I thoroughly enjoyed this post!
And now I would love to have a scone with the cream, my favorite, there was this wonderful little tea shop I used to go to that made the best pastries but my favorite was the scone with the clotted cream .

Fish in on the menu at least twice a week at my house ...

Have a lovely day ..

Judy Croome | @judy_croome said...

Hilary, your dedication to the A-Z blogging challenge is incredible! And you always manage to find new & interesting topics to write about! Cornwall is one part of England that's on my bucket list. That wild, wondrous coastline is so appealing (to say nothing of the Cornish cream & scones!)

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

Fishing sounds very dangerous. I've never tasted meade but I'd like to try it and I'm always interested in new wines.

Stephen Tremp said...

Pirates would love the Yarg cheese. I'll take the Pinot Noir. Everyone else can have the caviar. Wifey enjoys it. Me, not so much.

loverofwords said...

All I could think of as I read your post was what a great story could take place using all your details, the food, the scenery, just the look of Cornwall.

Mary Montague Sikes said...

Now I'm wondering if Cornish hens originated there. They are so delicious for special occasions. Fishing is probably more dangerous there than on the eastern coast of the USA. I don't know that much about the dangers here. Thanks for another interesting post!

cleemckenzie said...

We're both on about fishing today, Hilary! Very different kinds, but fishing, nonetheless. And I love Pasties!

Paula Kaye said...

I love the picture of the sardines packed in a barrel! I tried caviar on a cruise ship once and found it to my liking. The rest of our gang did not! Cornish Cream sounds delightful!

Smidgen Snippets & Bits

Sara C. Snider said...

I have no idea what kind of cheese Yarg is, but it sounds delicious if wrapped in wild garlic. And that scone looks amazing. :)

Mark Koopmans said...

A pinot noir from Cornwall... that's awesome!!

The nettle-wrapped yarg... hmmm I may have to have someone open that for me... I'm still traumatized by being stung by nettles as a kid :)

Jo said...

Oggies, I buy them from a Scottish bakery near by. They are delicious. The hotel owner`s wife used to make them where we stayed in Mevagissey. As for that scone, I am always bemoaning the lack of good cream here and you show me the Cornish variety. I loved the ice cream there too. Never heard of Cornish Caviar or Yarg come to that. I am learning lots about Cornwall from you. Pinot Noir too. Incredible changes.

Joanne said...

I went from fishing in Burma on a blog to fishing and more in Cornwall. I sense a Fishy theme for F

D.G. Hudson said...

I had to go and read the article on pasties. A friend from years ago had a British mother who encouraged us to try British foods. We used to buy them from Marks and Spencer in Vancouver. We can purchase pasties from some delis. I imagine I would have liked sitting by the sea and listening to a play.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Teresa – yes give it a try .. it’s not something you’re going to have everyday – but I do love it on occasions … like oysters – I now love them!

@ Elizabeth – sorry food always does that doesn’t it .. finally I’ve got to supper time!

@ OOTP – yes I know mining was around in the States long ago … but did it go ‘soft’ … we still have limestone mining in much smaller quantities though.

Yarg cheese is very good … a hard cheese with a slightly salty, acidic taste .. I love it .. good on a Duchy oatcake!

@ Alex – that’s great to know you’re ready for a drink .. after all the work you’ve been doing – enjoy and reap the benefits.

@ Chrys – I love both of them … if you get a chance give caviar a go sometime … a little on a canapé?!

@ Margie – so pleased .. and just sometimes I’d love a scone with clotted cream and blackcurrant jam … your tea shop sounds lovely … and I love pastries – I just try and steer clear for my waistline’s sake ..

Good for you – having fish on the menu twice a week – I have it regularly .. sometimes more often than twice, sometimes as this week .. it’s not on the menu: A-Z taking over!!

@ Judy – I just enjoy doing it .. and writing up these posts – oh I’ve got lots of interesting topics to write about .. just settling and getting it done earlier for next year’s A-Z!

I do hope you can get over and see Cornwall .. it is lovely and just beautiful – and yes the Cornish cream …

@ Susan – Fishing is a dangerous occupation, but must have been much worse a century ago, or before that. Mead is interesting … and the Pinot Noir sounds good doesn’t it ..

@ Stephen – Pirates enjoying the Yarg – their breath might smell from the garlic wrapped cheese, but it is such a good cheese. That’s good I’ll join you with the Pinot Noir, and your wife with the caviar! Sorted!!

@ Nat – I’d certainly be travelling and enjoying lots of food along the way – a good idea for story telling …

@ Monty – I’m going to solve this problem with Cornish hens popping up all the time – well two bloggers!! Check out my O post.

I expect all fishing is dangerous once out in the open water … just working in uncertain seas … glad you enjoyed the post.

@ Lee – I saw that you’re on about fishing in Burma – I love the way ancient ways are kept going. Pasties – especially home-made ones – are so so good!

@ Paula – it’s a clever way to pack the sardines isn’t it – they’ve been doing it that way for centuries. Ah – well we could share some caviar sometime – and Cornish cream .. I suspect you’d enjoy it.

@ Sara – it’s a hard Cornish cheese .. and it is delicious. Cornish cream teas are ‘the’ thing .. very Cornish!

@ Mark – yes we are producing some really interesting foods and drinks now … well I’ll have your Yarg portion!! Young nettles don’t sting .. but if you are stung by a mature nettle it sure does sting …

@ Jo – that’s good .. Oggies aren’t my favourite .. in fact I won’t eat them. I do enjoy home-made ones – I have to make them now!! Yes lots of new products are coming out – it’s fascinating how entrepreneurs are springing up. Wonderful for us …

@ Joanne – yes Lee blogged on fishing in Burma, and now here – but I can’t write about Cornwall without mentioning fish: it was a life line.

Cheers to you all – thanks for visiting .. Hilary

Annalisa Crawford said...

When it comes to food, I'm a poor Cornish woman - I don't like cream or pasties. Scones, though, I love :-)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi DG - the Minack Theatre is a special outdoor theatre - hewn out of the rock in the 1930s ..

I'm glad you had/have a Marks and Spencer in Vancouver - they do do good food.

Thanks for checking out my post ..

@ Annalisa .. seems like you're missing out on some things .. but scones are very good too ...

Cheers to you both .. Hilary

Karen Walker said...

Some day I will come to Cornwall and have fish with you, Hilary

Suzanne Furness said...

Some fine foods indeed. The County has much to be proud of for lovers of food and drink.

Lynn said...

I'd love to have that scone with the cream right now. It looks positively yummy.

Mark Clough said...

Lots of lovely local food there. You don't need to ever leave Cornwall to eat well.

Susan Scott said...

Ooooo fooooood! You know I am now lusting to visit Cornwall Hillary. I will take in Devon nearby for Devon cream and pop over for the clotted cream and scones and those pasties
When is a good month say fm July on
I really wanna come


Thanks for link to recipe. Lools easy enough!

TexWisGirl said...

i'm not much of a fish eater but i'd love to try some pastries!

M. J. Joachim said...

Fish is such a wonderful food, as are pastries, btw. Oh, I do enjoy a bit of Pinot Noir from time to time too, Hilary, and who could turn down caviar? Lovely post as usual! Nice to see you enjoying the Challenge :)

Carole Anne Carr said...

So many memories, really enjoying this. The only downside is that we must try to visit again this year, or possibly the next!

Roland D. Yeomans said...

Fishing off the coastline is always treacherous -- no matter the coastline! It seems government restrictions hurt more than help these days! Thanks for visiting my blog and chatting. I don't know if Mrs. Alex with ever forgive me for allowing Princess Aura to star-nap poor Alex! :-)

Nick Wilford said...

Cream teas and pasties are two of the greatest ever inventions. Thanks, Cornwall!

DMS said...

Looks like lots of interesting treats. Most of them are brand new to me! Would love to try them. :)
~Jess

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

Thought I'd finally drop by to see how your alphabetting festivities are going.

What the "F", I really am here....

In Looe of not having a lot to say, I shall make mention that Cornwall and a few Cornish panties, um, pasties, always makes me think of that enchanted section of England.

No fish jokes because I'm starting to F for Flounder....

Cheers,

Gary

Lynda R Young said...

Your posts always make me want to travel.
Great F post. Now I have a craving for fish...lol.

Lynda R Young said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tara Tyler R said...

really enjoying this tour of the sights, sounds, and tastes of Cornwall! from the pretty anemones (i thought those were only underwater!) and the strange mineral botallickite - to the dutiful duchy, esteemed and essential estuaries, and fabulous foods! yum!

looking forward to more!

kaykuala said...

So inspirational and so educational Hilary! There is so much to digest on Cornwall's goodness!

Hank

Sharon Marie Himsl said...

Such interesting history as usual where you live, Hilary. Someday you need to publish a recipe for those pasties...a mystery to Americans :)(didn't see skimming your other post).

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Karen – that’ll be lovely to see you here and enjoy an evening of lots of chat and some delicious fish.

@ Suzanne – your County is doing itself proud with the new products etc … it’s wonderful …

@ Lynn – well you could have that scone and cream ... but you’d have to do some travelling – they are yummy … so are treats!

@ Mark – you’re right about not leaving Cornwall to eat well ... and much of it is simple fresh fare too ..

@ Susan – I know I’m hooked on food ... sad really! Devon cream is similar (but of course different) to real Cornish cream. July and August are holiday season … probably the best time is early to mid-September when the schools are back, the weather is still reasonable (all things being equal!) … I hope you’ll get over ... and then we can meet – though I’m south of London on the coast.

I don’t put recipes up ... as I don’t weigh and measure … so I’m glad you think you could manage to make some pasties.

@ Theresa – it’s funny how some of us love fish and others not so much … perhaps the foods we had as kids. Pasties are delicious …

@ MJ – ah a fish lover! I agree ... and I love my own pasties – but I’m biased – not so keen on shop bought ones. Well we could easily share a meal … caviar and Pinot Noir as the pasties cook … thanks so much for coming by.

@ Carole Anne – I’m glad you’re enjoying the posts and they’re giving you ideas of perhaps a brief visit at some stage …

@ Roland – yes, I agree ... fishing is not a straight forward hobby or occupation is it – always hidden dangers. The European Union I think does us all some good – though of course it’s diplomacy and give and take in action … as change occurs. I wonder how Mrs Alex is doing … she must be a very calming influence! I’m sure she’ll handle the Princess Aura incident very well ….

@ Nick – it’s amazing how well known Cornish Cream and Pasties are ... they’ve done wonders for Cornwall.

@ Gary – well you would pick the “F” post wouldn’t you ..?! Though it’s good to see you and I certainly hope things buck up for you. It is a wonderful part of the world … one I love. Jo has a good recipe up for a Flounder!

@ Lynda – that’s wonderful to read ... and eat fish this time. I hope you can travel over sometime …

@ Tara – I’m delighted you’ve had a chance to read through the other posts ... I hadn’t thought about sea anemones, except I’ve been reminded about them! And thanks for alliterating your comment for my other posts …

@ Hank – it’s good to meet you ... and I’m so glad you enjoyed the posts .. Cornwall is a wonderful place.

@ Sharon – more history, yes … the pasty ‘recipe’ is there ... I just don’t do recipes – as I’m not precise in cooking .. Susan Scott said she thought she could manage it. Somewhere I have a basic recipe … I follow a tea towel one …?!

Thanks everyone – food and drink always go down well don’t they … cheers Hilary

Sara said...

It is amazing how much information you share about Cornwall. The Yarg looks interesting and the pastry yummy!

I can see how fishing might be a very dangerous occupation, especially in Cornwall!

mail4rosey said...

I'm a vegetarian, have never liked fish or meat...though I cook meat daily for the family. Now my daughter-in-law is in the family and she'll ONLY eat fish (and sometimes chicken) so I'm learning slowly how to cook it when she's here visiting (which isn't near enough!). :)

Clarabelle Rant said...

Custard pastry, cheese and honey mead - this post made me incredibly hungry! I had to go grab some more carrot sticks.

You can find me here:
ClarabelleRant

Marcy said...

Cornish Pasties and Cornish Cream! Mouth watering treats in the post.
Wish I were there!

Michelle Wallace said...

That HAS to be a fresh cream scone with jam!

I was at C.Lee Mackenzie's F-post a little earlier on. She described the fishing style of a Burmese fisherman. The fisherman manages the paddle with one foot to position his boat over the fish, and when he's ready, he drops that large net into the water. Am amazing balancing act is involved.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sara - thanks .. it's difficult to stop! The Yarg is delicious .. the pasty too - I do make them myself now ..

Yes fishing and trying to find food for one's family over 100 years ago would be so tricky and dangerous ..

@ Rosey - you've an interesting 'eating' family ... I'm not sure if I was vegetarian I'd be able to cook for the family .. but now how interesting you're learning about fish ... good luck and well done is all I can add!

@ Clarabelle - the pasty is a savoury pasty ... but custard is good, as too Yarg cheese and honey .. I'm just glad carrot sticks satisfied you sufficiently!

@ Marcy - I know it's a good place to visit ... and Cornish pasties always taste so good .. clotted cream says it all ..

@ Michelle - yes Clotted Cream Scone and Jam ..

I saw Lee's post on fishing in Burma ... and it looked really quite difficult - I agree ..

Cheers to you all - thanks so much - Hilary