Tuesday, 28 April 2015

X is for x-factor number of oddities …



That famous : the ‘X’ one … which will provide many of us with much difficulty to come up with a suitable post … so here are my x-factor number of oddities … found during the course of my search on all things Cornish … and I’m open to questions … which I can answer in a follow-up post in May …


c/o Evocative Cornwall calendar 2016
Charlestown Harbour - Poldark location



Let’s start with two Ts … Trewhiddle and Trethevy:
for further info please go to Wikipedia







Trewhiddle is just outside St Austell, on the way to the LostGardens of Heligan, a now non-existent tiny settlement, where plenty of interesting snippets came to light:


Trewhiddle Hoard at the British
Museum
250 years ago in 1774, miners streaming for tin uncovered a hoard of 114 Anglo-Saxon gold coins, together with a Silver Chalice and other gold and silver objects: hidden in about 868 AD to protect them from Viking raiders.  The finds are now in the British Museum, and are decorated in the Trewhiddle style.



Raspe's Munchausen
In 2003 another remarkable discovery was made, when a 150 year old lump of tungsten was found at the farm … its smelting requires extremely high temperatures, which were not known at the time … leading to the speculation that it may have been produced during a visit by Rudolf Erich Raspe – Raspe is best known as a rogue, and as an author or translator of the Baron Munchausen stories … 


... but he had an interest in chemistry, with a particular interest in tungsten.  Tungsten is also known as Wolfram ... the name tungsten comes from the Swedish for heavy (tung) stone (sten).


Tungsten rods, with evaporated crystals
partially oxidised with colourful varnish

 Legendary Cornish smuggler “Cruel Coppinger” may have bought the estate in the 1790s … I didn't mention him in my Smuggling post - he was cruel!






The second “T” under this X post!  Trethevy, a village between Boscastle (WitchcraftMuseum) and Tintagel Castle (King Arthur and his Knights), where a Roman gatepost, an inscribed granite pillar, has been found with the inscription (now covered in lichen!):

C DOMI N GALLO ET VOLUS
For the Emperor Caesars our Lords Gallus and Volusian



The Roman Guide/Gate post
Trevonianus Gallus and Antoninanus Volusianus reigned in the years 251 – 253 AD … 


... the pillar lends weight to the importance of the nearby trading post of Tintagel Island, where merchants from the Mediterranean came to trade with the Cornish for their tin.  (Tintagel is on the north coast of Cornwall).



St Nectan's Glen
In the heart of Trethevy is Saint Piran’s Chapel, dating from at least the mid 15th century, and a holy well, also dedicated to Saint Piran.    St Nectan’s Glen protects the spring and holy well ... the Trevillet River emerges through the slate rocks … and is believed to be a sacred place or cloutie well … with the telltale ribbons, crystals, and other devotions adorning the foliage and rock walls near the waterfall.  (See my W post for Clouties).



Men-anTol - is very near Ding Dong Mine
Neolithic Standing Stones see my N post


The Ding Dong Mine complex lies in the old and extensive mining area situated in Madron, just north of Penzance and looking out over St Michael’s Mount Bay.  




Tin Miners at Geevor mine


It is thought the name may refer to the ‘head of the lode’ or the outcrop of tin on the hill.  In Madron church there is a Ding Dong Bell that was rung to mark the end of the last shift of the miners in 1879 … reminding us of, or for whom the bell tolled.




Jerry Crow of the The White Crow Medicine Show sings about theDing Dong Mine … with some wonderful evocative photos of Mining Cornwall, as well as mining down the mine … it is 4 minutes long.



Emily Hobhouse, whom I mentioned under M for Liskeard and DistrictMuseum, who has a connection with my mother, via Jenny Hobhouse her cousin, wrote, page 34, from the Netherlands to her brother in England for his birthday in 1916 and wondered whether …







Scone with black berry jam and clotted cream
with Cornishware in the background
(I couln't find a blackberry pasty photo!)


… “he and his family would have a picnic with blackberry pasties and clotted cream where they were in Cornwall.  Her body longed to be with them at Bude in Cornwall.”








Sarah Lay's Evocative Cornwall's cards
A few years ago … I was in Penzance before Christmas and did a quick whizz around seeing what I could get for our Cornish family … and came across Sarah Lay’s cards and Calendars … I’ve ordered every year since … Sarah sent out her latest email re her 2016 range … to which I asked if I could promote her on my blog – here is her response: 



What a great thing to do - and good for you for thinking up interesting alphabetical aspects of Cornwall - how pleasing to have such interaction too.  What a novel way of being introduced to things you might not know about.  


The A is for Artists and Anemones couldn't be more fitting for the Newlyn Artists Calendar 2016 cover!  Of course I would be really delighted for you to link my website to your blogs - thank you for suggesting it. Reaching new people is always good.


Sarah Lay's Evocative Cornwall
Newlyn Artists Calendar 2016



I timed my A post (Artists and Anemones) well this year … as you can see … and I love Sarah’s cards – they are different, and they are such fantastic views of Cornwall …  I feel nostalgic ‘for home’ though I’ve never lived in Cornwall …








Someone asked about the definition of the "West Country" and Wiki has a map - it's quite clear and rather good!:



The counties of the West Country - starting in the west
Cornwall with Land's End, Penzance, etc
Devon with Torquay, Exeter etc
Somerset with Taunton, Yeovil and Frome etc
Dorset with Weymouth, Poole, etc
Wiltshire with Salisbury, Trowbridge
Avon and Glos - with Bristol and Gloucester: I wouldn't
strictly call West Country ... but they are here!


That is X for x-factor number of oddities ... from Aspects of British Cornish …


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

54 comments:

Bob Scotney said...

I never thought that anything this good would come out of the X-factor! There is so much in this post for me to find out more about.

Valerie-Jael said...

Another really interesting post, thanks for sharing our 'oddties'. Greetings from Rhineland, Valerie

Fil said...

Now I have definitely got to go to Cornwall - starting looking for folk clubs today.
It's always great fun reading people's X entries - great post Hilary :)
Fil @ Fil’s Place - Old songs and Memories

Natasha Duncan-Drake said...

I think I remember seeing the hoard in the British Museum - it has so many wonderful things it's sometimes hard to remember what we saw when we last visited :) I love the mystery of the Tungsten. I haven't been to Trethevy, which is odd because we've spent a lot of time down as Boscastle and Tintagel - an oversight we must rectify when we go back.
Tasha
Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

Empty Nest Insider said...

What beautiful calendars and cards! The sculptures near the Ding Dong Mines look like donuts. I agree that Cornwall looks like a lovely place to visit. Thanks Hilary!

Julie

T. Powell Coltrin said...

I love your line about feeling nostalgic for Cornwall, although you've never lived there. I do that also, feel nostalgic for places I've only read about.

Have a great day!

Teresa

Susan Scott said...

Lovely X's Hilary thank you. I absolutely love cards and when I'm there I will surely get Sarah Lay's ones ...

Rosie Amber said...

I'm trying to pronounce Trethevy without sounding like a blithering idiot and spraying my keyboard - more practise needed, me thinks.

Anabel Marsh said...

I recognise some of this from our holiday last year, especially Ding Dong Mine and Men-an-Tol.We had a lovely walk round there, and the (?) Nine Sisters - that last name might not be right. I'm enjoying all the creative uses of X today!

Annalisa Crawford said...

I always thought the Romans stopped at Exeter - we certainly haven't got any of their roads this far west, sadly!

I'm sure the definition of West Country is widening over the years, as more and more people would like to say that's where they live!

To Rosie above, the pronunciation of Trethevy is probably along the lines of Treevy - please don't take this as gospel, but the letters aren't that important. Launceston for example is pronounced as Lawnston by emmets and Laanson by the Cornish.

Zannie Shaman said...

its is such fun to see how creative people have been with 'X' in the challenge.
Love the image on the Newlyn calendar.
Curious about the mention in your Y post!!
zannierose A-Z return visitor

Jo said...

More fascinating information Hilary. I love the finding of the hoard of gold coins and a Silver Chalice. It makes me wonder how many lost hoards there are undiscovered.

Deborah Barker said...

X already? Oh dear - I have so much catching up to do but I have enjoyed all your Cornish musings that I have read so far and your X factors are perfect. It was while visiting the Lost Gardens of Heligan, with my late sister and brother-in-law, that we settled on Fowey, Cornwall as our second home and I am so glad we did. Another T for your X factor assortment, our house, Treleigh :-)

Rhonda Albom said...

Interesting X :) I found several X's, 9 to be exact.

holli said...

What a wonderful, educational and interesting post! So much history. That waterfall picture is beautiful. I love waterfalls. So is clotted cream better than it sounds? Just the word clotted makes me turn away.

Out on the prairie said...

Great post, I just got a Oddities of Iowa book concerning the state I live in.

Christine Rains said...

There are a lot of X-factors there! So many fascinating tidbits. The Ding Dong Mine sounds like the name of a quirky story.

Chrys Fey said...

This is an awesome post full of great tidbits. You've taught me a lot.

Clotted cream doesn't sound good, but it sure looks good. ;)

I love all of the pictures you've shared for Standing Stones.

cleemckenzie said...

Very clever. I'm always curious about what people will do with their themes with they come to X. This was brilliant.

The discoveries that seem so unlikely are truly mind-bending. Those history mysteries make me itch to do research.

And I'm also itching to have some clotted cream with blackberry jam.

Mark Clough said...

Well done, Hilary, you cleared the X hurdle with ease. Only trouble is I really want to eat some scones with jam and clotted cream.

SHANAYA TALES said...

Haha.. clever use of X. This was a fascinating read. Thanks for sharing the oddities.

Sara C. Snider said...

A great post of odds and ends. Beautiful waterfall, and those cards too. The tungsten, also, is strangely beautiful.

J.L. Campbell said...

Had to see what you came up with for the X post. Lots of interesting places and those Blackberry pasties are making me hungry!

J.L. Campbell - The Character Depot | A-Z Challenge Co-Host

J.L. Campbell said...

Had to see what you came up with for the X post. Lots of interesting places and those Blackberry pasties are making me hungry!

J.L. Campbell - The Character Depot | A-Z Challenge Co-Host

Marie Moody said...

Oh WOW! What an interesting Post you have my new friend! Yes, I am following you now. There is so much to see, and take in. Love it. I just may go back and look at a few more letters too. You write so elegantly and so much to say! Well, excuse me for now I'm going to go read some more. Totally cool! :) have a wonderful day.

Lynn said...

I always love a look at your world, Hilary! And love the use of X. :)

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

I remember hearing about the hoard. All I can think of it that the poor people that hid it from the Vikings obviously didn't survive the raiders and could never reclaim it.
Very cool of you to support the maker of the calendar and her heartfelt appreciation.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Obviously Raspe did more than write stories.

Suzanne Furness said...

Sarah's cards look great, I must look out for them. Blackberry pasties? Now that is a new one on me!

Jeffrey Scott said...

Lots of little tid-bits to share. Excellent!

D.G. Hudson said...

How nice to get a response about the calendar and its link to your posts! I like the look of that scone with blackberry jam and cream . . . I would dearly love to see the English coastline, I love to see the sea. You make me want to visit some of these places you highlighted, Hilary!

Nilanjana Bose said...

I am a nostalgia junkie too :) about places I've lived in and those I've only visited and those I've never set foot in, I don't discriminate..Plenty of meaty X's in your post.. and the calendar and its creator both sound delightful.

KAT Writer said...

X was vexing wasn't it. I love the photo of tungsten rods there is something otherworldly about them.

Joanne said...

extremely good - you out did yourself on X oddities. It's all so fascinating - love the Ding Dongs. And Sarah's cards look enchanting. Very nice.

Nick Wilford said...

What a good round-up. The Lost Gardens of Heligan and the Ding Dong Mine - now there are names guaranteed to capture the imagination. A blackberry pasty is a new one on me, but it sounds great.

Mary Montague Sikes said...

You are certainly making Cornwall sound interesting.

Reading the "W" post, you were certainly brave to learn to glide!!!

samantha mozart said...

It's all good, and fascinating, Hilary, but I'll go for the blackberry pasties and clotted cream. Actually, they look much like the scones I make to have with my morning coffee -- minus the blackberry jam and clotted cream, although I wish.

Cheers,
Samantha Mozart
http://thescheherazadechronicles.org

Sharon Marie Himsl said...

Good use of the X-factor, Hilary! Who would have guessed Cornwall had so much to offer?

Mark Koopmans said...

Haha! That was fun - and now I know where the saying "You're a Ding Dong" comes from :)

Maria said...

Wow!! I wouldn't have thought of "x-factor" for letter X. Smart entry for letter "X'. And yes I was struggling the most for this letter.

Silvia Villalobos said...

Interesting that Emily was a connection with your mother, that alone made me take a second look. I like the creative use of X, Hilary, considering X could be used as an unknown in math. Well done. I sure learned about a good (x) number of oddities today.

Penny the Jack Russell dog and modest internet superstar! said...

Hi human, Hilary,

"X" marks the blogspot....

I'm a bit confused, not as confused as alleged human, however. I get what you did here after reading it twice. Did you not know there is a village named "Xylophone" in Cornwall? Kidding and arf!

Happy almost finished alphabetting to you, my kind human friend.

Penny

Kern Windwraith said...

You clever woman, you! What a great idea for your X post--the X factor! Love it!
The names get me every time: Trewhiddle, Trethevy, Lost Gardens of Heligan, Boscastle, Tintagel Castle. They just set the imagination on fire. Fascinating, that discovery of tungsten. Very curious.

Clarabelle Rant said...

A great collection! Your posts have been really enjoyable and they make me want to get out and travel again :)

You can find me here:
ClarabelleRant

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Bob – thanks Bob and I’m glad you’ll enjoy looking around at the links.

@ Valerie – many thanks … lots of oddities in Cornwall!

@ Fil – I emailed you re the music scene – it is very strong down there … just wish I knew more about it. Yes the X entries are always an interesting … different take on life read, aren’t they …

@ Tasha – I must look out for the Trewhiddle Hoard next time I’m in London at the BM. Funny about the tungsten – I wondered if I should put it in … but from the comments I’m glad I did. That’s great that you’ll see Trethevy, next time you’re in the area …

@ Julie – the calendars and cards are special … I know the megalithic Men-an-Tol does look like a donut – but I hate to tuck into a granite donut!! Perhaps one day you can get over to visit ..

@ Teresa – thanks … I’ve been down often enough over the years … so I’ve almost lived there .. and yes we do get nostalgic for places don’t we … we can dream into the storyline …

@ Susan – thank you … Sarah will be delighted to sell you some cards …

@ Rosie – I hope you saw Annalisa’s comment just below about pronouncing Trethevy (tre evy – sort of swallowing the th!). Splattering our keyboards is easily done … especially with ‘furren’ words!!

@ Anabel – so pleased I brought back some memories for you … the Merry Maidens are nearby (further west) … while the Nine Maidens are further east near St Columb Major. X always brings out the best in most people .. creativity abounds.

@ Annalisa – these people travelled far and wide. No may be not roads that are obvious ... but I bet somewhere there are some under the straight lanes. West Country – I expect it is changing … but it goes back to Saxon times with the realm of Wessex.

Pronunciation: Thanks so much for the tips … I know the Cornish have funny ways of saying things, as too some of the English names … thanks for the use of emmets!!

@ Zannie – we are a creative bunch when it comes to the funny letters! I always like doing X … And I always look forward to getting their Artists’ calendar, as well as the Cornish one!!

@ Jo – I expect a few hoards to go still … plenty of people looking. Glad you enjoyed the post …

@ Deborah – I know April whips past. Interesting to know how you settled on Fowey as your 2nd home … I don’t think I’ve ever been – and really need to rectify it … and another “T” Treleigh … so many of them – but it’s lovely to know it means settlement … but I’m not sure what leigh means (meadow perhaps).

@ Rhonda – I found your 9 Xs .. lovely photos of Auckland

@ Holli – good to see you … and most definitely clotted cream is delicious ... if you like cream! Delighted you like the waterfall disappearing into the Holy Well …

@ OOTP – thanks .. how fascinating that you bought your Oddities of Iowa – bet there are lots of interesting facts …

@ Christine – yes I can abound with x factors! But I too love the Ding Dong mine and its history …

@ Chrys – delighted you’ve enjoyed being here and the ‘learning’ … to me clotted cream sounds luxurious!! So pleased you’ve been happy to see the Standing Stones … I have to say I thought everyone would be horrified at all the granite, lichen covered blocks … but no …

@ Lee – thanks – I’ve learnt to be creative … makes life easier. There’s lots of reading that can be done – the tungsten story I was bemused by (well stunned at their knowledge!) … let alone all the other mythical and folk stories ... I could do with clotted cream and blackcurrant jam on a scone with a log fire and a big pot of tea and a book – it’s cold and damp!!

Thanks everyone … I’m a little behind – but catching up … cheers Hilary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Mark – thanks … yes I got thoughtful early on about X … the scones, jam and cream do look so good don’t they …

@ Shanaya – so pleased you enjoyed the read … great to see you here …

@ Sara – thanks … lots of different bits and bobs … the waterfall I’d like to see one day; the tungsten surprised me; but the cards and calendars are just brilliant …

@ Joy – ha ha .. having a peep were you?! It’s a fun post to write … and one day I must try to make blackberry pasties …

@ Marie – glad to meet you … and thanks for the complement re writing elegantly and yes, I do have lots to say!! Enjoy your visits to the other letters …

@ Lynn – many thanks – my world rolls around and enjoys itself … and am happy the X matched up …

@ Susan – there are different hoards, I wrote recently about the magnificent Cheapside Hoard (London), and a while ago about the Staffordshire Hoard and I’m sure there are many more …

Sarah Lay’s cards and calendars are wonderful for the Cornish far from home … ie up country!

@ Alex – Raspe was a bounder …. Seemingly, but an interesting character.

@ Suzanne – yes do keep an eye out for her cards and calendars … I’m not sure where her outlets are – I know I first found them in Seasalt in Penzance. Now I order direct …

I loved Emily’s comment form 1916 about wanting a Cornish blackberry pasty … knew one on me too!

@ Jeffrey – glad you enjoyed them …

@ DG – yes Sarah was very gracious – but the Cornish are supportive. The scone, jam and cream would be good today – it’s cold and wet!! Perhaps one day you can get across again – I know for now that’s just not possible … and the sea is special …

@ Nila – nostalgia can hit us can’t it … I get it for South Africa and London at times … and I bet you do too … Thanks re the meaty Xs!! And the calendar, and Sarah …

@ Kat – nope X was not vexing! I don’t do vexing. It’s funny isn’t the way they attract … those tungsten rods …

@ Joanne – many thanks … there’s always questions or things I’ve forgotten that can get tidied up into X … Ding Dong is such a fun name .. and Sarah’s photos are excellent …

@ Nick – many thanks … I think I could do many round-ups .. all the places I’ve mentioned seem to resonate Cornwall … and if I travelled with a Cornish pasty and a blackberry past I’d be very happy!!

@ Monti – well that’s very good news – I’m just delighted you’ve found ‘my Cornwall’ interesting. The gliding was a wonderful thing to do at 16 … and I could drive up there – as it was a private site … so my parents would drop me over and leave me with a car … and I could practise my driving during the day – they were fun times … let loose!!

@ Samantha – yes the pasties I couldn’t find a photo .. so we ended up with blackberry jam scones and clotted cream … Your morning coffee sounds a goodly affair!

@ Sharon – thanks .. it was a fun post. I honestly think I could do another few A-Zs on Cornwall …

@ Mark – delighted … and perhaps that’s where that phrase comes from … but I’d hate to admit to it coming from Cornwall .. as I suspect it’s derogatory …

@ Maria – I’ve been doing the A-Z a few years and if I need to be creative … so I become!!

@ Silvia – thanks .. Jenny has Emily’s papers, but researches still to find extra snippets that are relevant – as some papers were lost in the War.

I’m just happy everyone, you included, are enjoying my creative posting on X for x …

@ Penny and Gary – I didn’t find the village of Xylophone – I guess it might be a dog’s village – special to Penny – now that would make sense. I’ve enjoyed the A-Z … been a bit stressed this year, as I was doing something else too … but am at the end tomorrow – whee-hee!!

@ Kern – so pleased you’ve enjoyed visiting and it’s a pleasure to meet up with you in this A-Z … the names are magical as too the places. The tungsten snippet amused me and as you say was a curious one.

@ Clarabelle – many thanks .. I appreciate your comments and hope perhaps you’ll make it to Cornwall sometime ..

Thanks so much - cheers Hilary

Julie Flanders said...

Ooh Sarah's cards are gorgeous!
And what a fun post for X. Love all these oddities. :)

scarlett clay said...

Those are really beautiful cards! They quickly caught my eye, thanks for sharing! :)

Stephanie Bird said...

What a gorgeous medley. I especially love the photos you shared. To think you could get so inspired by the letter "Y"? Impressive.

J Lenni Dorner said...

The tungsten rods with crystals- wow! Those are amazing.
Great post.

sage said...

I know a bit about Cornish miners (but in America). They were prized miners in the American West. I have also made and eaten a few pasties.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Julie - Sarah Lay's cards and calendars are just lovely .. glad you enjoyed my X oddities!

@ Scarlett - good to see you .. and yes cards and craft are your skill areas - these are so Cornish ... I love having them around.

@ Stephanie - a happy X medley .. such a good word - thank you. X inspired me early on .. knew I needed to turn up trumps for the X post.

@ J - the tungsten rods with the crystals do look amazing don't they - I nearly didn't put them in .. but couldn't resist .. so I'm delighted you enjoyed finding out about Tungsten.

@ Sage - good to meet you ... yes - our miners emigrated when the mining industry here ran out of veins to mine ... and I know the Cornish miners were prized all over the world - the States, South Africa and Australia ...

So pleased to read you've made pasties - so much nicer .. the homemade ones ..

Thanks everyone - so pleased my X for oddities was a good choice .. cheers Hilary

Michelle Wallace said...

The calendars/cards are lovely!
I remember those Standing Stones from your N-post.
Clotted cream looks deliciously decadent!
St. Nectan's Glen looks positively peaceful... such a tranquil-looking spot. Therapeutic.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Michelle - Saray Lay's Evocative Cornwall cards and calenders are great aren't they ... Lots of standing stones in Cornwall - now we seem to be finding out more, where possible - i.e. not totally ruined by the Victorians in their first explorations and desire for information of previous times.

Clotted cream is always good ... and the therapeutic St Nectan's Glen does look lovely and relaxing doesn't it ..

Cheers and thanks for your visit and comment - Hilary