Monday, 13 April 2015

K is for Kernow’s Kitchenware ...



Kernow, the Cornish language name for Cornwall, first appears in 1400, deriving directly from the original Cornovii.  It is considered to be a corruption of Durocornovium, ‘a fort or walled settlement of the Cornovii’.


"Cornweallas" shown on an
early  19thC Anglo-Saxon
map, based on the
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle


The name Cornwall derives from the combination of two separate terms from different languages:  Corn from the Cornovii – the Celtic people, who had lived there since the Iron Age, while –wall derives from the Old English w(e)alh, meaning a “foreigner” or “Welshman”. 





Ancient Celtic Tribes
Cornwall as a name first appears in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles in 891 as On Corn walum.  In the Domesday Book it was referred to as Cornualia and in c 1198 as Cornwal.



Architect's impression of the Old Brewery at Redruth
where the new Kresen Kernow will be based

Kresen Kernow is the new archive centre in Redruth … it’s good to know Kernow's Kitchenware will not be residing there, only history and memories of the Cornovii’s rich past.




Back to Kernow’s Kitchenware … the ceramics’ iconic design of blue and white bands reminding us of the blue skies and white-crested waves of Kernow: branded Cornishware.


Cornishware


TG Green was founded in 1864 … Mr Green and his new wife, Mary Tenniel, were honeymooning in Cornwall when they bought up an existing pottery.




You might know the name Tenniel – Mary was the sister of Punch and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland illustrator, Sir John Tenniel.

A storage jar for Viota -
a type of  cake mix

Cornishware’s familiar blue and white stripes were first created in 1926, quickly being used on many products, books, adverts, fashion magazines … spreading its timeless design across the globe.


It has been updated and then due to its demise resuscitated in recent years … understandably that early Victorian pottery workshop struggled in the 20th and 21st centuries.  Thankfully the stripes are restored to their rightful position.


That is K for Kernow, Kresen Kernow archive centre can be found in Redruth, and for Kitchenware: don’t knock the Kitchenware it might be knobbled ... from Aspects of British Cornish …


Just a quick note re Corningware .. which some of you have asked about:  Corningware  is an American glass oven to table ware product developed in the 1950s ... a very useful product, which I've used all my life.  While the Cornishware is pottery ... a different material altogether ... and is a definitive design and brand representing Cornwall.

Hilary Melton-Butcher

Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

55 comments:

Bob Scotney said...

I have just accepted Kernow for Cornwall over the years. I'm ashamed to say I never looked into how the name originated. Thanks, Hilary.

Maria said...

Lots of interesting "K"s here Hilary! Thanks for sharing. Thanks also for the history of the word Kernow.

Natasha Duncan-Drake said...

I am learning history :) I love it. So interesting about the origins of the name. I have to admit I'm not a fan of the blue and white stripes, but it definitely looks practical :)
Tasha
Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

Nilanjana Bose said...

None of the history behind the names known to me previously, great to...k for know!

Thanks for picking such a wonderful theme.

Best
Nila.

Gattina said...

Interesting post to know more about the origins of Cornwall !

Out on the prairie said...

Now I will have to check with a friend to see h=if she knows the origin of her last name, Korn. Krazy!LOL

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

I love the clean look of the blue and white stripes. I think here in the American South we've corrupted the name/pottery...locals call what's in my cabinets "Corningware" and it's not nearly as pretty of a blue.

Munir said...

I love that blue.
Very unusual "K" word, but of course this is a blog full of knowledge and I thank you.

Rhonda Albom said...

Interesting, especially the history of the name - for some reason I giggled at foreigner OR Welshman.

Annalisa Crawford said...

It's very striking kitchenware, isn't it?

The Cornish name for my town is Essa, in case you were wondering :-)

Annalisa, writing A-Z vignettes, at Wake Up, Eat, Write, Sleep

Sara C. Snider said...

I love etymology and the way language changes over time. It's really interesting. And I'm glad a classical pottery design has been resuscitated--makes it a little more special, in my book. :)

Jo said...

Unfamiliar with that Cornish ware. This is a very interesting series you are doing Hilary. Things I don't know about my own country of birth.

Carole Anne Carr said...

Yes, remember that blue and white stripe being used on paperbacks, might have been penguin. Didn't realise it was the name for Cornwall, when I saw Kernow I immediately read it as Curnew, the rector I worked with for several years, and yes, he came from Cornwall.

Margie said...

I really like the blue and white of the kitchenware ..
Another most interesting post, Hilary.

L.G. Smith said...

I did know about Wales basically meaning foreigner. :)

And what iconic-looking pottery. Makes a statement for sure.

Chrys Fey said...

I love all of the history lessons you give us. :)

I like that kitchenware.

Christine Rains said...

Thank you for the great history lesson for today. I really like the blue and white ceramics.

Julie Flanders said...

Ooh I love that pottery! The blue color is just beautiful.
Interesting to learn about the name. I can't deny I like the name Cornwall better LOL.

Susan Scott said...

Thanks Hilary, I didn't know the early origins of Cornwall so this is very interesting indeed. And that wall means foreigner or Welshman.
The pottery is pretty. Wonder what type cake mix Viota is? Oat cakes maybe?

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

I would love to have some of pottery in my kitchen. Interesting origins of the name and how far back it dates.

helen tilston said...

Hello Hilary,
I love this short historic lesson on Cornwall. I am happy that the pottery is still being made. It is beautiful and blue always cheers me up, particularly in pottery.
Hope you are feeling great
Helen x

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Looking at the definitions for the two parts of Cornwall, you could almost translate it to mean ancient foreigners.

Jeffrey Scott said...

I love hearing word origins. Cool to hear the origin for Cornwall. And the pottery was a neat story too.

mail4rosey said...

I really like that people take efforts to restore things. Our history really does have a place in our futures.

cleemckenzie said...

That pottery is perfect for the Cornish area. So crisp and clean looking, too.

I've been taking pictures of Tenniel's illustrations. They're in my 1940 copy of Alice In Wonderland, and I wanted to post them in connection with a book launch. Such beautiful black and white drawings.

Rosie Amber said...

I've heard of Kernow and I knew about the Cornishware, but I didn't know about all those tribes and how they split up the Cornwall of today, fascinating.

Joanne said...

love the Cornwall blue and did not know the story. This is a really interesting A to Z. Happy Monday

Lisa said...

Loved hearing this history. Have a very dear friend who is from Cornwall or should I say, Kernow, and I wonder if he knows all of this! Lisa, co-host AtoZ 2015, @ http://www.lisabuiecollard.com

Lynn said...

That blue and white pottery is lovely. Good job on the challenge so far, Hilary!

loverofwords said...

I wonder if our Corning Ware had its origins in Cornwall's blue and white pottery? Corning ware had a whole line of white, not pottery, baking dishes with a blue flower design on the front. Hmm, they might have "borrowed" the idea.

Kristin said...

That was very interesting, especially trying to say the words I have not heard pronounced in my head. I have seen corning ware but never the original kind. The little display in your picture looked like a display of dollhouse kitchen ware.

Suzanne Furness said...

I learnt something new today, thank you. I don't have any of the kitchenware but see it around quite a lot.

T. Powell Coltrin said...

Oh, that's pretty ware, blue and white. Right up my alley.

A Tarkabarka Hölgy said...

I flew over Cornwall once, but I would really love to visit. I love the stories... :)

@TarkabarkaHolgy from
Multicolored Diary - Epics from A to Z
MopDog - 26 Ways to Die in Medieval Hungary

Melissa Sugar said...

Interesting piece of history. I love learning history tidbits. I have to admit, though, i have never been a fan of blue and white stripes. I think it is because we had so much of it in my home growing up. I hope you got your gift card by now.

Karen Lange said...

Loving this assortment of "K's", Hilary! Very clever. I like stoneware in almost any color, and these look quite nice. Thanks so much for the interesting lesson! :)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Bob – I think you’re probably similar to many of us accepting Kernow as Cornwall .. glad you enjoyed the ‘true’ story!

@ Maria – glad you enjoyed the post and learning about Kernow ..

@ Natasha – that’s lovely .. so pleased to read about your interest. The blue and white can be quite in your face can’t they .. I think I preferred the early versions .. perhaps not so wide: but so Cornish.

@ Nila – thanks so much .. and I’m so glad you’re enjoying the theme .. it’s been fun for me too ..

@ Gattina – thanks .. having visited last year you’ll understand some of this ..

@ OOTP – oh that’s great .. do let me know .. I met another blogger and suggested she had to be Cornish from her name – and yes she was! Strange but true …

@ Elizabeth – as I’ve emailed you .. re Corningware: I’ll just comment similarly here: Corningware is an American product ... that was one of the first oven to table ware dishes .. I had lots of it - the dishes are so useful .. and I still have one flat one, which I use ...
I gave the others away ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CorningWare

I'd buy more if I had more space!!

It's also a form of glass ... not pottery ..

@ Munir – thanks so much … and you’re very thoughtful in your comments ..

@ Rhonda – glad you enjoyed the history .. and yes – but we raise the portcullis along the border when those ‘foreigners or welshmen’ come to call ..!!

@ Annalisa – it is striking kitchenware … I’ve noted your town name – and you feature under R .. wonder why – check in!

@ Sara – I do too .. it’s always such fun finding out how words/ names came about .. the fact the pottery still exists is great isn’t it .. rescued from the brink ..

@ Jo – appreciate the comment .. I’m just highlighting a few snippets that I recollect from my childhood or knowledge today ..

@ Carole Anne – Penguin biographies .. dark blue and white – good memory. Then the Pelicans … light blue and white .. fascinating you remember – thanks!

@ Margie – glad you enjoyed the look in at the kitchenware ..

@ Luanna – yes I thought you might know about the Welsh being foreigners .. but so I’m sure did many other raiding tribes become known. The pottery does stand out doesn’t it ..

@ Chrys – thanks so much .. just appreciate you’re enjoying the posts and knowledge .. and yes the blue and white stripe pottery is lovely isn’t it ..

@ Christine – so pleased you enjoyed this ‘history lesson’ .. and the blue and white of the pottery ..

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Julie – the pottery is so indicative of the sea, waves and white waters isn’t it .. and that’s fine Cornwall it is ..

@ Susan – I’ve been enjoying all I’ve learnt too .. let alone the bits I haven’t been able to post ..

Viota – I think must have been a mix from the 1920s … not a modern version of cake mix .. I just don’t know I’m afraid …

@ Susan – well apparently the brand is out there around the world .. I guess you could order it online!! I found the history of the company good to know about ..

@ Helen – it is a brief and very erratic story line around Cornwall .. still thankfully many are still enjoying the tour around. The pottery you, as an artist, would appreciate …

Thanks .. I seem to have fully recovered from the hip operation … everyone seems to think so!

@ Alex – the county is 80 miles long .. so in those very ancient days – the tribes could easily stay apart … and I’m sure you’re right in your thought ..

@ Jeffrey – delighted you enjoyed both stories about the naming of Cornwall and about the pottery ..

@ Rosey – well I was so interested in reading the story and love the history behind it … and yes history does live on doesn’t it ..

@ Lee – I agree with you re the blue and white and so appropriate for Cornwall. How fascinating that you’ve been taking pictures of your 1940 Tenniel drawings from Alice… for your book launch .. sounds delightful ..

@ Joanne – thank you so much re your comment – I’m just delighted you’re enjoying the posts …

@ Lisa – nope .. it’s still Cornwall today .. til the Cornish take over?! I slightly doubt your friend will know much about the odds and ends I’ve been posting about – I’ve just added to my knowledge all the time .. but I’d love to hear his comments …

@ Lynn – thanks so much and lovely to see you …

@ Nat – I answered Elizabeth earlier .. but repeat it here:
Corningware is an American product ... that was one of the first oven to table ware dishes .. I had lots of it - the dishes are so useful .. and I still have one flat one, which I use ...
I gave the others away ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CorningWare

I'd buy more if I had more space!!

It's also a form of glass ...

The design is completely different and one is glass and our Cornishware is pottery … so no copying ..

@ Kristin – check my answer to Lee above re Corningware .. sorry it’s difficult to say how they’re spoken here ..

It does look a little like a mini-display doesn’t it .. but I wanted to show the range .. just glad you enjoyed the post – that’s what matters ..

@ Suzanne – that’s great coming from a Cornish lady .. I don’t have any of it .. but my sister in law does ..

@ Teresa – isn’t the Cornishware pretty – always reminds me of Cornwall …

@ ATH – well I hope you can get down to Cornwall sometime .. and I’m so glad you’re enjoying the posts/stories .. thank you

@ Melissa - so pleased you enjoyed the post with its history. I can believe blue and white won't charm everyone - and can understand your reason not to prefer it now.

I did get my gift card .. to which I replied with a thank you .. lucky me winning it ...

@ Karen – good to see you .. and the blue and white is such fun isn’t it …. and am so pleased you enjoyed the ‘lesson’ ..

Thanks everyone .. so good to see you .. and I’m so chuffed you’re enjoying the trips and history of Cornwall .. cheers Hilary

Arpita Sharma said...

I just discovered your blog via Arlee Bird's blog. Loved it. Knowledge blogs are so well researched, I am in awe of the dedication. I loved to visit this post.

Kristin Smith said...

Hi Hilary! Thanks so much for stopping by my blog! Such interesting information you presented for the letter 'K.' I must say, I didn't know any of it!

So great to "meet" you! :)

Nick Wilford said...

I didn't know the origin of the name. So was there a Welsh tribe there too at some point?

Kern Windwraith said...

Fascinating once again! In North America we're just so used to place names being what they are, it doesn't always occur to us that in other countries these place names have a heritage and genealogy of their own.

Kernow's Kitchenware might not belong in Kresen Kernow, but as you say, let's not knock it--it's quite delightful in its own right. What cheerful pottery it is, with it's pleasing blue and white stripes.

Thanks for another entertaining history lesson, Hilary.

Truedessa said...

I am enjoying reading your blog some interesting subject matter. I wanted to let you know I wrote that poem about the Goddess in the Garden and I added a link to your site since this is where the idea generated. Thanks and have a great evening.

Stephen Tremp said...

So they Tenniels had business as well as pleasure on their minds on their honeymoon. Smart people, those Tenniels.

KAT Writer said...

It is such a lovely blue. Thank you for telling me what Viota was. I love your blogs. I feel like I am on a journey through your lovely home town with you.

Mark Koopmans said...

Sadly, while I spent three years living in Ol' Blighty, I never made it to Cornwall.

Having enjoyed (and enjoying!) your fascinating series, Hillary, I know I need to visit, if I should ever visit England again :)

Mark Koopmans said...

PS. Forgive me for adding the extra "L" (I've been watching too much TV about the *other* Hillary :)

Michele Truhlik said...

I love the Cornishware! The blue and white colors are fabulous and the simple design is striking. I would love to have a set!
Question: does Corningware have anything to do with Cornishware?? I have Corningware in my cupboard...
Great K post! Thanks for the education Hilary!
Michele at Angels Bark

Tammy Theriault said...

I was gonna say that the name Cornwall reminds me of kitchenware. Ha!

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Arpita – thank you for coming from Lee’s blog .. and am so pleased enjoyed the post ..

@ Kristin – you too .. so lovely to see you here .. and again I aim to please and provide interesting information ..

@ Nick – the Celts were a mix weren’t they .. I’m not sure about an actual tribe of Welsh. But those ancients travelled didn’t they ..

@ Kern – thanks so much. I think it’s a challenge we all have, we don’t think of things til someone highlights them – exactly as you say. So pleased you enjoyed the archive centre at Kresen Kernow .. and the pottery ..

@ Trudessa – thanks for letting me know about your poem .. I was keeping my eye open for it – I’ll be over and thanks too for the link back.

@ Stephen – they must have had a huge interest in art and its various disciplines … thankfully they did and saved the Cornishware …

@ KAT – good to see you and yes the blue is a real blue isn’t it – like the sky so often. I had to put in what Viota was otherwise I’ll be asked .. I know the commenting around the A-Z!!

Thanks .. I live south of London on the south coast – this is the county of Cornwall … but I have family connections and many happy times to remember from the county.

@ Mark – if it’s not on your beaten track you don’t get there .. I’m so pleased I’ve visited Ireland a few time .. it’s stunning too ..

I’m used to extra ‘L’ .. and now I shall forever have a double L in my name .. no worries! I hope you do get to visit when you get back over to Europe again ..

@ Michele – it is stunning isn’t .. and the colours do just represent the blue sky and white crested waves. Perhaps you can get one piece … or even a whole set …?!

Re Corningware … it is an American production, and in fact is glass – a new (1950s) type of glass …oven to table ware – I love it – such a useful kitchen ware and at one stage I had a lot: I bet you enjoy your pieces. The Cornishware is pottery …

@ Tammy – oh no .. well I guess you could easily suggest that … but there’s so much more to Cornwall .. still I love the comment and its thought!!

Cheers to you all – I’ll add a note in to the post re Corningware .. I can see it cropping up if new people come and read the post in due course … thanks so much for your comments - Hilary

Deborah Weber said...

I'm so enjoying your series Hilary - and learning so much!

Sara said...

As always, you find the most interestingy things to teach me about. I loved reading this post and learning about both the name Cornwall and the source of the blue and white striped Cornishware.

It was also interesting about connection to Sir John Tenniel. Amazing how you can tug on one thread and find so many others of interest!

Michelle Wallace said...

The mention of blue and white Kitchenware made me think of the Delft crockery... also blue and white...

J Lenni Dorner said...

Oh, very interesting. I hadn't heard of these before. (Do know what Corningware is though.)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Deborah - so pleased you're enjoying the series and learning during your visits - that's what I like to hear!

@ Sara - I'm just glad people like to read my selections ... that makes me happy! I teach myself too ...

Yes I enjoy finding those connections - tugging that thread as you describe it ...

@ Michelle - Delft ware ie exquisite - this is robust in looks and solidity of pottery. But Delft is amazing .. beautiful creations ...

@ J - that's great you knew about Corningware ...

Thanks so much - sorry I'm belatedly replying to your comments ... cheers Hilary