Friday, 17 April 2015

O is for Onen Hag Oll and Oddities …



Onen Hag Oll … is the Cornish motto: One And All!

Heraldic Emmet
(from Finland)

That’s that then … done and dusted … easy peasy … One And All in the A-Z … here we go on our way to various oddities to amuse …



Samuel Pepys and Tea: on Tuesday 25th September 1660 after some business discussions … Pepys ‘did send for a cup of tee (a China drink) of which I never had drank before, and went away’. 



Tregothnan's Tea in a box

The Tregothnan estate today produces Cornish tea, and Cornish Cream Teas in a box … that are shipped around the world.  I’ve posted about tea and the Tregothnan Garden Estates in three posts ... if you care to pop up and look via the search box.





The Rillaton Gold Cup was found when the Barrow, on the eastern flank of Bodmin Moor, was excavated in 1837 along with human remains, grave goods, a bronze dagger, beads, pottery, glass and other items …

Rillaton Gold Cup


The finds were sent as Duchy Treasure Trove to William IV (1765 – 1837) and remained in the royal household.  



After George V’s death in 1936 the importance of the Rillaton Cup and associated dagger came to be appreciated … George V had been storing his collar studs in it!!  They are both on permanent loan to the British Museum … sadly the other items disappeared … if they had been stored, then today with our modern abilities more could have been ascertained about the Barrow.





Roasted Cornish Hen with vegetables
Cornish Game Hens – I’ve been asked about these on other occasions … so now perhaps it is something I can clarify!  Cornish Hens – well known, I gather, in the States – are an immature bird, which is a cross between the Cornish Game and Plymouth or White Rock chicken breeds … it develops a large breast over a short period of time compared to game hens.  It is not a game bird.  And though called a “hen”, it can be either male or female.



White Plymouth Rock Hens
Alphonsine “Therese” and Jacques Makowsky of Connecticut are credited for developing the small bird in the mid-1950s.  They cross-bred the Cornish game cocks with various chickens and game birds, including a White Plymouth Rock Hen and a Malayan fight cock, to develop the Rock Cornish game hen, a succulent bird suitable for a single serving.



This brings memories for me -
the little Red River coming out of
the dunes at Godrevy and Victor Borge
was a favourite of my uncle and aunt


The musician and comedian Victor Borge was both an investor and promoter of the Cornish Hen in the early years … changing it from an exotic into a common household meal.



These are the sandworkings inland
near Camborne/Pool


Copper Sands, Seas and Shells … when we were children we played on the beach at Godrevy (the lighthouse opposite St Ives in the bay) … the little Red River (Dowr Koner in Cornish) appearing from the dunes stained the sea, sands and thus shells …




Red River and its course

You can see its course starts in the hills of one of the main early mining districts: Camborne and Pool …now (tin mainly) mining has stopped the river is back to its normal colour … but it used to amuse us …




Emmet – this is a pejorative nickname that some Cornish people use to refer to the non-Cornish … perhaps those “furriners” or Welshmen … I seem to have referred to on occasions in these postings!  
c/o John Dyer Gallery  


Emmet is thought to derive from the Cornish-language word for ant, being an analogy to the way in which tourists and ants are often red in colour and appear to mill around!





That is O for Onen Hag Oll and Oddities … no Oddballs, yet no Ordinary Objects can be Omitted from O for One and All … from Aspects of British Cornwall …


Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

46 comments:

Suzanne Furness said...

Didn't know any of that about the hens. Lots of lovely Cornish tidbits to digest today. Have a lovely day, Hilary.

Susan Scott said...

Never ordinary your posts Hilary thank you! I've definitely heard of the Cornish Hen now I know a little more. Maybe they have them in fancy delis I wonder. Will check at Thrupps which has delicacies from all over, not usually obtainable in regular stores.
Have a lovely weekend!

Nilanjana Bose said...

My favourite bit in today's feast - Emmet! A bit like classifying the world into magical folk and Muggles, didn't know that Cornish did it too! :)



Ciao,
Nila.

Lynn said...

Cream tea - interesting thought. I'm so impressed with the depth of items you are coming up with for the A to Z. Good job, Hilary!

Robyn Campbell said...

Fantastic job, Hil. I giggled at the emmet. Ha. I had this picture in my mind.... :-)

I'm from the Keys, so I get the memories of sea, sand and shells.

I remember Victor Borge. But I didn't remember he was from England? I didn't know about his relationship to cornish hen. So interesting.

xoxo

Natasha Duncan-Drake said...

LOL - tourists are red and tend to mill around - well you're not wrong ;) Your mention of cream teas is making me hungry!
Tasha
Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

Out on the prairie said...

Never heard of a cream tea, I will look it up. O is for outstanding, for job well done with this challenge.

Sue McPeak said...

Great sense of humor you UK'ers have...I'd love to be among the Emmet's. Here in Texas we refer to them as Tourista's, Yankee's or Transplants...many come and stay. Interesting about the Cornish Game Hens.
Sue at CollectInTexas Gal
AtoZ 2015 Challenge
Minion for AJ's wHooligans

Rhonda Albom said...

Lots of information here, but somehow I am focused on the cornish hen. My mother used to make them frequently, and I never gave any thought to what they were before today.

loverofwords said...

Another interesting post, Hilary. Emmet sounds so mild, non-Cornish visitors would not know they are being insulted.

Annalisa Crawford said...

I'm an emmet myself - I've only lived in Cornwall for 30 years (and in a town that many Cornish people refuse to accept as Cornish!!! - so much for Ibe and All, eh?)

Annalisa, writing A-Z vignettes, at Wake Up, Eat, Write, Sleep

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Suzanne – they’re known as Cornish Hens in the States – the link to Cornwall .. not much – but as I’ve been asked … I felt I should at some stage answer.

@ Susan – no .. I don’t think I do O for ordinary! You might find Cornish Hens in Woolworths … that’s likely too – but Thrupps certainly may well have them.

@ Nila – Emmet .. so pleased I included that snippet. Certainly a word that could be used in a variety of ways … We’ve got lots of magic folk down here … we’re the land of lore …

@ Lynn – cream tea – is because it amazes me Tregothnan grows tea in Cornwall and then ships it with a scone, plum key jam (their speciality), and clotted cream in that box around the world. Thanks and I’m so happy to read you enjoy the mix of information I’m using … I don’t like to stick to the same thing …

@ Robyn – thanks .. glad you enjoyed the ‘emmet’ – it’s a good descriptive name isn’t it. I can’t remember much about the red rivulet running out to sea – except it was red, and so were the sands and sea nearby …

Victor Borge was Danish, but escaped at the beginning of the War and so was American … and lived in Connecticut, which is how he knew the Makowsky’s … so he wasn’t English …

@ Tasha – yes Emmet is a good word isn’t it .. and tourists are red and do definitely mill around … sorry about the cream tea thought – mind you: it was lunch time for you …

@ OOTP – plenty of references in my blog to Cornish Cream Tea. Thank you so much for the compliment.

@ Sue – yes our humour is different to many other countries … and perhaps you can come over and be an emmet sometime?! We refer to tourists as other things too .. and yes you have lots of us lot over in the States …

@ Rhonda – odds and ends of interest I hope – but the Cornish Hens keep popping up – so really needed to include where and how they came about. I’m glad I reminded of your mother’s cooking of the Cornish Hen ..

@ Nat – thanks so much … Emmet probably is relatively mild – but there’s lots of them and we don’t much like lots of tourists – though they do have cash to spend … Also they’d have to be able to understand the Cornish dialect?! I can’t do dialects though ..

@ Annalisa – only 30 years … not nearly long enough?! And to cap it off the townsfolk don’t feel Cornish .. that’s too bad – exactly what happened to the motto …

Thanks everyone – lovely seeing you .. cheers Hilary

T. Powell Coltrin said...

First time I've heard of cream tea. Yum. I've never had Cornish hen and would love to try it.

Silvia Villalobos said...

No, I didn't know about the Cornish hen, at least not much. The tea sounds interesting, and that cup ... wow, all that cup had seen in its time, glad we got a look at it and learned more about the history behind it. Thank you, Hilary.

Carole Anne Carr said...

Wow, quite a journey, teatime for Samuel and chickens and ants, love this jaunt through Cornwall, can't wait to return next summer :0)

Deniz Bevan said...

Oh my! I hadn't known about Victor Borge's connection to Cornish hens! And the dialect words are fascinating. If I had time I'd try to learn Cornish on top of wanting to learn Welsh :-)

Jo said...

Cornish hens are delicious but no more Cornish than Australian sheep dogs are from Australia or French poodles from France. Why do we give them these appelations? To make them more enticing do you suppose?

Interesting oddments Hilary, I must look into that Cornish Tea shipped around the world. I wonder?

Victor Borge was, and still is, one of our favourites. We have lots of VHS tapes of his concerts.

I wonder what all that red stuff was doing to the sea.

What a shame the other items disappeared. Glad they are now on display.

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

George V was just making the cup useful!

Sophie Duncan said...

Emmet 'ant' does seem like an appropriate term for a tourist, we do tend to wander around and get lost if the trail we are following is missing its sign, just like ants when the pheromone trail is broken. :) We're also fond of a good Cornish Cream Tea, too!
Sophie
Sophie's Thoughts & Fumbles
FB3X
Wittegen Press

Chrys Fey said...

I love tea. I'd like to try Cornish tea.

Interesting tidbit about Cornish hens!

Rosalind Adam said...

Gosh! I remember when chicken was for a special occasion only but I didn't realise that Victor Borge had a hand in changing this!

Margie said...

I always so enjoy my visits here as I always learn something new.
Just putting the kettle on for a cuppa mow , care to join me, LOL ...I do love a good cup of tea.

How very interesting that tidbit about Victor Borge.

Have a nice weekend Hilary

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

My family does love those Cornish hens. Guess I would be an Emmet. I live near Hershey so we gets lots of tourists also in the warm months. Not always fun for those of us who live and work in this area.

Bob Scotney said...

One of my wife's school friends worked for Victor Borge for many years. He was a favourite of mine - some of today's comedians could learn a lot from him.

Julie Flanders said...

The Emmet nickname makes me laugh. Can't deny that groups of tourists often do look like hens puttering around.

Julie Flanders said...

Geez I meant to write like ants, not hens. I think the A-Z is getting to me LOL.
Happy weekend, Hilary!

Lisa said...

I guess I'd be an "Emmet"! Just watched a film "The Best of Victor Borge". I hadn't seen anything of him since I was a kids, so was surprised when I remembered how he played (and never finished!) the piano along with his jokes! How sad the other things in the barrow are lost. The main thing I like about this particular post is the names of what you tell us about; Onen Hag Oll, Pepys, Tregothnan, Rillaton, Bodmin, Duchy. It's like reading Tolkien! Lisa, co-host AtoZ 2015, @ http://www.lisabuiecollard.com

Michele Truhlik said...

Your posts are so interesting Hilary! I love your story about the word Emmet! Made me laugh. And the gold cup is stunning. You are just full of fascinating information! I enjoy your posts.
Michele at Angels Bark

Mark Koopmans said...

And again I learn something useful from your posts, Hilary (with one "l" :)

I never tried a Cornish hen until I came to the States and had always wondered why it wasn't something I'd heard of while living in Leeds :)

Paula Kaye said...

Richard and I used to fix Cornish games hens often in years past. I should do that again. I think the kiddos would get a kick out of them

Stephen Tremp said...

Thanks Hilary for the scoop on Cornish Game Hens. Its a treat my wife has mastered using a Dutch Oven.

Jeffrey Scott said...

I don't know if I've ever had a Cornish game hen.
As Linda Richmond would say, "Cornish Game Hens. They are neither games, nor all hens. Discuss".

Elizabeth Mueller said...

though the cornish game hens have been bred as such, good that they are not genetically modified! *shiver*

Elizabeth Mueller
AtoZ 2015
My Little Pony

David P. King said...

One and all. I like it. And that stone O is awesome. :)

Joylene Nowell Butler said...

I remember watching Mr. Borge on TV when I was a kid. My mother loved him, and would stop doing whatever chore she was doing to sit and listen. She would always smile. Nice memory. Thanks, Hilary.

klahanie said...

Hi Hilary,

O no, it's taken me ages to get back to your blog.

After reading your post, I have this urge to go to Cornwall. Nothing like a Cornish Hen that's Game for it.

Cheers,

Gary

Trisha F said...

That's interesting about Emmet, since Emmett is becoming more and more popular as a name nowadays. :)

I want a roast chicken for lunch now!

Empty Nest Insider said...

Interesting how Cornish Game Hens can either be male or female! You deserve an A+ for originality Hilary!

Julie

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Teresa – oh gosh these are the very best … a Cornish tea with lashings of cream. Cornish hens are so American …

@ Silvia – the Cornish hen story is interesting and I was amazed to be asked about it … the tea has been a success story – and the Rillaton cup is a fascinating story isn’t it .. there’s a similar one that was found in Kent – the other end of the south coast …

@ Carole – that’s great you’re scheduling in a visit to Cornwall. Yes this was an O for Odd post!

@ Deniz – Victor Borge was one of my aunt and uncle’s favourites too … and I’d no idea about his connection to the Cornish Hen. You are incredible – how big is your brain??!! Welsh and Cornish .. I can’t even manage French!!

@ Jo – I know no more Cornish than so many other things … I guess someone from Cornwall called them that or identifying their origins. Yes – I stretched my O post … I expect the tea is in speciality shops, or airports, or diplomatic areas and is definitely in Japan in a big way …

Victor Borge was so funny to listen to – so clever …

The red of the sea were the mineral backwashings .. with some arsenic! Contaminated little river, that’s clear now.

At least the Rillaton cup was saved.

@ Alex – exactly … it looked pretty, didn’t tarnish and was the ideal container for cuff links!

@ Sophie – I was beguiled by ‘Emmet’ and its pejorative description … and as you say … we get bemused if our
pheromone trail is broken .. Cornish Cream teas are just so delicious .. and it’s Saturday – time for one perhaps?

@ Chrys – I did have some Tregothnan tea and it is rather delicious, quite expensive too for someone who doesn’t really like tea. Glad the Cornish hens tidbit made a good read.

@ Ros – yes we had our own chickens … and I’m sure a roast chicken was very special. The Victor Borge connection was a good find …

@ Margie – yes I was drinking tea too when your comment came through! Glad you enjoy visiting .. thanks and the Victor Borge aspect is a good find – he was so well known ..

@ Susan – they’re a good meal aren’t they … and yes if I go abroad I’d be an Emmet … and living in a tourist area you’d understand ‘the nuisance’ tourists can be – yet valuable to the economy …

@ Bob – how fascinating … the stories about Borge and his recordings must be such fun to hear. I agree – the comedians today don’t really stack up – well in my mind!

@ Julie – ‘the Emmet’ word fascinated me too – I kept it ready for this year’s A-Z … I think tourists puttering around could definitely be like hens with their combs and wattles .. flapping around ..

So funny to see your ‘help’ reply comment to your own … thanks – made me laugh …

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Lisa – I’d be an Emmet too .. what a coincidence you watching the best of Victor Borge – I must see if it comes up here .. but I only have basic tv.

Yes relics etc are lost .. but they may appear from the bowels of one of our museums … I certainly mixed and matched in this post …

@ Michele – so pleased to see you and thank you. Just glad you enjoy visiting and see what comes up!

@ Mark – thanks for the one I – appreciate that. Interesting to read that you were aware that you hadn’t had a Cornish hen living here ... but then found them in the States.

@ Paula – I’m so glad I brought back some happy memories for you re the chicken dinners you and Richard cooked together – I’m sure the children would munch them up very happily … enjoy when you give them a go again ..

@ Stephen – I remember the Dutch Oven cooking aspect – but the picture here was ‘more enticing’ in my book! At least I’ve answered the query for you …

@ Jeffrey – I’m not sure I have had them either .. we have a Poussin … but it’s twice the size. Love the quote .. I guess she’s a comedian …

@ Elizabeth – yes they’re not genetically modified thankfully … true cross breeds …

@ David – yes I was pleased to find the Cornish motto … the stone ‘O’ is the Men an Tol in my previous N for Neolithic post – I guess …

@ Joylene – I’ve seen him on tv occasionally .. but he was always on the radio at times. My aunt and uncle loved him too and quoted him all the time … good memories as you say.

@ Gary – it’s good to see you – and no worries re the visiting … getting better is more important. I’d love to go to Cornwall too … and chicken for dinner? Might do that …

@ Trisha – is it becoming a popular name – how funny … I’ll remember that … and yes I’m hungry right now – but must wait ..

@ Julie – finding things out is my entertainment .. and thanks so much for the A+ for O for originality ..

Cheers to you all – lovely to have all the interaction .. Hilary

Sara C. Snider said...

The idea of cream tea boggles my mind. Would like to try it, all the same. :)

Milo James Fowler said...

Wow -- I wonder what it took to convert a badger? =)

J Lenni Dorner said...

The tea looks yummy.
I have had the Cornish Game Hens here. They're in most big supermarkets. It's like, "Don't want to get a whole chicken for $4? Get this smaller, slightly more difficult to cook bird for $12!" It's also the bird of choice for people who don't want to use a whole turkey on Thanksgiving. "Oh, it's just the two of us, so we got a Cornish Game Hen."

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sara - I hope you'll be able to visit one day and then enjoy a cream tea - preferably in Cornwall with Cornish Cream ...

@ Milo - thanks for your comment - re St Piran in my next post ...

@ J - yes the tea does look good. Interesting comment for the Cornish hen - but supermarkets do do that don't they .. price strangely if you're cooking for smaller quantities ... The Thanksgiving Cornish Hen makes sense - Turkeys are big birds with lots of delicious meat on them ... but one needs masses of people around to help finish it up ..

Cheers to you three - Hilary

Michelle Wallace said...

Still lurking.
I love my tea. Honey-flavoured Lipton Rooibos tea is my favourite!
We have Cornish hens in our supermarkets... quite tasty.
Emmett made me think of a man's name on a TV show... now I'm trying to think which programme.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Michelle - glad you still lurked - thanks! Tea .. the honey flavoured Rooibos sounds good .. I have some organic rooibos in the cupboard - reminds me of my SA days: but your honey flavoured rooibos tempts me. A good roast chicken is delicious isn't it .. or braaied ... I'm sure I too have come across Emmett as a name ... but now I will think of an ant! Cheers Hilary