Wednesday, 29 April 2015

Y is for Why have I not included literature …




Y because this is where it has fallen!  I am relying on you all to add to my list …


A poster

In my morass of books … I have lots of reference books … some scattered around in this post … but no novels, so let’s start and I take no prisoners!




Menabilly - which Daphne du Maurier leased
during her stay in Cornwall


Daphne du Maurier an “incomer” who has written extensively about Cornwall … Rebecca / Frenchman’s Creek / Jamaica Inn. 



Fowey – the towndu Maurier lived near Fowey for many years, and at Menabilly, the in the dower house nearby where she died in 1981 ... drew other authors too ...


A Guide Book of Ward Lock and Co
my mother loved hearing articles
from here - see my post

Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch published under the pen-name “Q” was truly Cornish being born in Bodmin, while he lived in Fowey for many years.  He is mainly known for his monumental Oxford Book of English Verse 1250 – 1900 (– later extended to 1918).



Q guided the taste of many who never met him, including the American writer Helene Hanff, author of 84, Charing Cross Road … and the fictional Horace Rumpole, via John Mortimer, his literary amanuensis*.


Another Guide Book my
mother loved hearing
stories from 


*Amanuensis … I had to include this snippet … as one day I was chatting with my mother, in the Nursing Centre, about some letters in and out we’d received … she suddenly said “You’re my Amanuensis” … I had no idea what she was talking about and needed her to spell it for me!  Then I needed to check what it meant … essentially her scribe!  Nothing wrong with her brain – she may have had some major strokes, but she was full of repartee … and had us all laughing uproariously.




Kenneth Grahame lived part of the year in Fowey in the 1890s and early 1900s.  Grahame attributed Quiller-Couch as the inspiration for the character Ratty in his “Wind in the Willows”.


Poldark Cookery (1981)


Winston Grahamthe Poldark series – he was also an “incomer” but based his Poldark books in and around Perranporth, where he lived for over 30 years.




The Poldark Cookery Book by Jean Graham (Winston’s wife) …which includes Y for Yeast Bread … I expect this will be reproduced too … lots of fun snippets and recipes …  



1,000 Cornish Place Names Explained … I didn’t use it – but now I’ve found it – I shall use it!!  Its description Cornwall’s strange mellifluous place names give it a flavour quite different from other counties.  Many must wonder where they come from.




This book is designed to help not only the bewildered stranger, but also the born Cornishman who may have taken them for granted since childhood.”  Loved that description.




“The Spirit of Cornwall” by Denys Val Bakerhe highlights artists, authors, potters, sculptors, poets who have all drawn inspiration from that mysterious and majestically beautiful western tip of England: J M W Turner, Thomas Hardy, D H Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Bernard Leach, Barbara Hepworth, du Maurier .. to name some …

But!! I see he was Welsh ... lived all over the place being Yorkshire born spent time in Sussex, where I am ... his Wiki page makes interesting reading ...  



“The Little Land of Cornwall” by A L Rowsepoet, historian, lecturer: Cornish born, bred and died … living in Oxford for many a year.  In this book he celebrates and illustrates the diversity and variety of Cornwall.  Its main theme is to establish its separate identity, its difference from an ordinary county.  Hence its title …



I quote more from the blurb at the back (what’s its proper name – you authors?!) “The author’s subjects are wide ranging – all the way from the Age of the Saints, through the Middle Ages, Tudor Times, and the Industrial Revolution to the present day (1986).  Fascinating and idiosyncratic personalities are described.  Literature, folklore and legend, as well as history, are drawn upon to describe the creation of a markedly individual people and a familiar and beautiful landscape that still has many secrets to reveal."

Lane down to the hamlet of
Trenarren


The result in “The Little Land of Cornwall” by Rowse is a feast for all who love this unique land.




Rowse lived at Trenarren House – takes me back almost all my life – to great friends of my father … at Oxford, the stove story, my school, and all our holidays in Cornwall … they also lived in Trenarren.


Now who have I missed … lots and lots of authors …



 Charles Dickens and William Thackeray visited St Nectan’s Glen, Trethevy in 1842 (see my posts V, W and X) …


John T Williams author of Pooh and the Philosophers lives in Trethevy.



Rosamunde Pilcher : “The Shell Seekers” ... she was born very close to St Ives... I have read ... 



 John Betjeman – the north Cornish coast inspired some of his most celebrated and evocative poetry … he authored the first Shell Guide on Cornwall …  he lived the last 10 years of his life at St Enodoc ... 





There’s a gentle 4 mile walk: Sir John Betjamen Walk:  on the eastern bank of the Camel along part of the South West Coast Path through the dunes beside the golden beaches on the eastern bank of the River Camel, taking in his grave at St Enodoc Church.  Passing Brea Hill, site of a Bronze Age burial mounds and a later Roman encampment, and there’s an optional detour to the holy well used by the Welsh hermit Enodoc to baptise his converts.”  



William Golding – Cornish – “Lord of the Flies” and others … he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983.


 
Richard Tangye
- the story of his
company and back
story of his start in
Cornwall 


Richard Tangye he is not strictly an author, but his grandsons were … Derek and Nigel … their Cornish history though is interesting … see Wiki







Hawker's Hut
Robert Stephen Hawker (1803 – 1875) – priest, poet, antiquarian of Cornwall and reputed eccentric.  He is best known as the writer of The Song of the Western Men”with its chorus line of:




And shall Trelawny die?
Here’s twenty thousand Cornish men
Will know the reason why!


Which he published anonymously in 1825 – Charles Dickens acknowledged his authorship in the serial magazine Household Words.



Cornish Fishing in the
days of sail
Richard Carew and his Survey of Cornwall, published in 1602, I mentioned under V for vocabulary, together with The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall by Professor W P Jago.


We have at least three bloggers and/or authors that I know of – who live in Cornwall … one is “an import” I gather!



Annalisa Crawford - author of "Cat and the Dreamer" and her blog ... she has been participating in the A - Z.



 Suzanne Furness - is not doing the A -Z, but like Annalisa has been a good blogging friend for years ... 


Zannie Shaman, who lives in Perranporth ... I've only just met through the A-Z ...





Yiminy Crickets … boy do I have lots of reference books on Cornwall … but apparently no novels!!  I found the reference books on W day … not much help.   But I wasn’t really able to walk much as I was hip-hopping happily around getting used to that new inch and that new hip … can’t believe I’ve so many books/booklets – could easily do another ten A-Zs I reckon!  The subject is being changed for next year though.


Boy can I W for waffle ... I admit it!!


So that is Y for Why I eventually got to Yachting around and to Yammer to Yourselves out there in the A to YZ Yippee of reaching Y sphere … and realising Why could be for  Y  I have, until Y,  not included any literature … so that is my Y from Aspects of British Cornish …


Check out Goodreads – Best Books Set in Cornwall
List of Cornish Writers - Wikipedia

and all the suggestions you will all be leaving for us - and under Z I found some others ... and there are plenty of others.


PS I'm adding Sarah Foot (1939-2915) - a charismatic West Country writer and scion of the Foot clan.  She wrote atmospheric books on Cornwall and her personal memoir of her grandfather, Isaac Foot, threw fresh light on the Devon carpenter's son who rose to become a prominent lawyer, orator, Liberal politician and founder of an extraordinary dynasty.  Her first book, the best-seller 'Following the River Fowey', included interviews with old Cornish characters her grandfather would have known, such as the retired tinner Ralph Finch who recalled the appalling conditions he endured in the mines on Bodmin Moor.  Nine more West Country titles followed.

Hilary Melton-Butcher
Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

42 comments:

Annalisa Crawford said...

Thanks for the shout-out (again) Hilary :-) I'm in very good company, and how wonderful is having the pen name Q!

I love Daphne du Maurier's short stories, but have never been able to get into her novels.

Annalisa, writing A-Z vignettes, at Wake Up, Eat, Write, Sleep

Zannie Shaman said...

was curious as to how I would get that honourable mention. Did you write some/all of your posts in advance- such a lot of work!

Zannierose a-z

http://shamanism.webs.com/apps/blog/entries/show/43207905-w-wren

D.G. Hudson said...

You've done an impressive job of filling in the whole page, Hilary, highlighting fellow bloggers and showing us even more books. But as for novels of the area or by authors of the area, I am not familiar with any.
I always thought a back blurb was called a blurb. . .is there a new name for it?



Suzanne Furness said...

Thank you for the honourable mention, Hilary. Your posts are always a joy to visit and I have read a good number of your A-Z posts even though I have not been part of the epic A-Z!

As for other local writers the one that springs to mind first thing this morning is the poet Charles Causley and the novel, Elosie by Judy Finnigan (who has a home in Cornwall now). If I think of any more relevant titles during the day when I have woken up fully, I will pop back here.

Thanks, Hilary.

Manzanita said...

When I was younger (quite a bit, I might add) I read my way through Daphne du Maurier and then I always become interested in the author, themselves. I want to know "why" they write on the subjects they choose.
Now in this 2 year purge of books, I did feel some loss when Daphne left my bookshelf.

Once again, we're nearing the end of A-Z. Your great love of research always intrigues me.

Lisa said...

your knowledge is wide and vast and deep, and I enjoyed your Y summary, how did you do it

Jo said...

I do remember Sir Arthur Quiller Couch and had/have a small book called Stories by Q. Daphne du Maurier was also a favourite once upon a time. I have really been enjoying your dissertations on Cornwall. Way to go Hilary.

Out on the prairie said...

I laughed at only reference. At a dinner party the hostess asked what we all had been reading. Alas most of mine is almost all reference, I replied with a book on bird behavior. Nobody was too concerned.

Bob Scotney said...

Daphne du Maurier had to move out of Menabilly when the Rashleighs wanted to move back in. She moved to its dower house, Kilmarth where she died aged 81.

She also wrote 'Vanishing Cornwall' which included photographs taken by her son, Kit Browning. I have a copy with the original B&W photos. I understand the book has been republished with Kit's colour photos instead.

He and his family live in Ferryside, the house at Fowey where Daphne wrote her first novel, 'The Loving Spirit.'

T. Powell Coltrin said...

I love the writing of Daphne du Maurier and of course I've read Charles Dickens. The others--not so much.

So cool that you featured bloggers who live in Cornwall.

Chrys Fey said...

I'll have to look for “The Little Land of Cornwall." I am interested in reading that one. :)

Joanne said...

"that was Rebecca's chair" - classic du Maurier - she was so good. I read all of her work. Love all of the literature references - I shall have to see out more. I can recommend a friend of mine - Ann Summerville - who's written cozy mysteries set in Cornwall. Check her out - good writing.

Suzanne Furness said...

Hello again! I said I'd pop back if I thought of any more Cornish novels/writers during the day. There is the detective series 'Wycliffe' by W.J.Burley (this was also made into a television series). Also, the children's writer, Sharon Tregenza.

Bish Denham said...

Wow! That's a lot of literature. You're library must be huge!

Maria said...

I like your prompt for letter "Y"! How creative and resourceful! ;-)

I am now digging up my postcards on what to post for "Z". We're on the last letter now. Yey!

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Lots of authors and books.
Author of Pooh. That just sounds funny.
And if you do British authors next year, you have someone for Q.

Susan Scott said...

Lovely post Hilary - whew what a lot of books, Y not .. will bookmark to digest more thoroughly.
Tomorrow looms, I yearn for a walk on the beach in the last few days we have here at the sea ..

Susan Scott said...

Lovely post Hilary - whew what a lot of books, Y not .. will bookmark to digest more thoroughly.
Tomorrow looms, I yearn for a walk on the beach in the last few days we have here at the sea ..

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

Wow, you do have a lot of reference material and what a rich history of writers in Cornwall. Must be something inspirational in the air.

cleemckenzie said...

Daphne du Maurier was one of my first favorite authors when I was a teen. Loved Frenchman's Creek and Jamaica Inn.

Pilcher's The Shell Seekers was lovely.

I didn't know those bloggers hailed from Cornwall.

Meet you at Z tomorrow.

Lisa said...

Lovely! I am reading the Tales of Cornwall you mentioned in a previous post and loving it. I ordered it straight away on Amazon. Cornwall is looking better and better to me know that I'm learning so much about it from your blog this year! We are almost to the end of the alphabet! Lisa, co-host AtoZ 2015, @ http://www.lisabuiecollard.com

Nilanjana Bose said...

Have I told you that I am a fan of du Maurier? :) Like a hundred times already? I have all her books from The Loving Spirit to Vanishing Cornwall.

What an amazing Y post Hilary, writers, fiction,non-fiction, bloggers, and done with your unique brand of positivity and humour. Learnt a lot about Cornwall here, I am going to miss your posts once the A-Z is done.

Paula Kaye said...

I do not believe I have ever read a Cornish novel!

Sara said...

I can't believe you're already on "Y", but I bet you're glad to there:~) I apologize...I'm so far behind! I think I told you this, but you've wet my appetite for visiting Cornwall.

Regarding the books, one of my favorites was this one: Mistress of Mellyn by Victoria Holt. I think I've read a hundred times and love it just as much each time:~)

samantha mozart said...

You have mentioned some of my favorite authors here, Hilary -- Du Maurier, as I've said previously, Thomas Hardy; and from what you've taught us about Cornwall, I think I can see the Cornish influence in Dickens's writing.

I saw "The Shell Seekers" in a British TV production and liked it, and am looking forward to watching "Poldark," another British TV production when it airs soon.

I could go on and on about literature, and that the British seem to have a special knack for writing mysteries and romances. Love them. Thank you.

I think if I lived in Cornwall I could write some wildly imaginative stories. :-)

Samantha Mozart
http://thescheherazadechronicles.org

Jeffrey Scott said...

1,000 Cornish Place Names Explained sounds like a book I want to read. Always fascinated by word origins.

Sue McPeak said...

Your book yammering list was amazing. I loved the Shell Seekers, and forgot about it being set in Cornwall. I also loved the movie. Yikes...I have fallen behind on commenting. I had to do some real brainiac work to come up with X,Y and Z to fit my theme. Only Z left...Thank goodness Ya'll.
Sue at CollectInTexas Gal
AtoZ 2015 Challenge
Minion for AJ's wHooligans

DMS said...

I read The Shell Seekers quite a few years ago- but I haven't read anything else on the list! Sounds like there is a lot to learn about Cornwall. :)
~Jess

Sharon Marie Himsl said...

Hmm...I think like The Shell Seekers. Intriguing list. One more day to go!!

Valerie-Jael said...

Great books listed there, bringing back many good memories. We used to sing the 'song of the western men' at primary school. Have a lovely day, Valerie

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Annalisa – you are, as an author, in very good company and isn’t Q a good pen name. I’m not sure I’ve ever read du Maurier either, seen some to the programmes on her work …

@ Zannie – and so now you know where the honourable mention came from!! I ended up not writing any in advance ... some in March- but then I got behind again … hence I was able to include you in the mix …

@ DG – thanks … I’m surprised you hadn’t heard of du Maurier, at least, but you’ve read lots and lots of other books and I’ve bought some on your recommendation …

Maybe it is just a back blurb … thanks for the mention though – no one else has come up trumps, so perhaps there isn’t another name!!

@ Suzanne – I know you weren’t doing the A-Z, but you’re always around and are a good Cornish woman!! Thanks for reading through some of the posts.

Charles Causley is one I wasn’t aware of, but I saw him mentioned when I was researching Z. The Finnigans do ‘live’ in Cornwall now don’t they .. I haven’t read any of her works ..

@Manzanita – I can understand you purging books – sad to lose old friends. Yes something triggers a thought for an author and off they go and write – I’m sorry about Daphne du Maurier’s books leaving your shelves …

Thanks re the research … I just ‘think’ of a subject or two, and then ‘weave’ them together – remembering my audience, and my own love of learning … my voice then appears …

@ Lisa – thanks Lisa – as I mentioned to Manzanita above … it just sort of happens: the A-Z helps … because I need to fill all the letters.

@ Jo – my ‘Cornish and Oxford aunt and uncle’ were admirers of Q and his work – they knew many of his friends … So pleased you’ve been enjoying my dissertations on Cornwall – thanks!

@ OOTP – how funny … I can understand the ‘blanking out’ of your reading matter … I open my mouth and everyone wilts!! I would like to know more about bird behaviour and did get a book a few years ago, by a well-known journalist, who writes on nature.

@ Bob – apologies I’d forgotten your essay and research you’d written on du Maurier. ‘My Cornish aunt and uncle’ knew her well and the Rashleighs – in fact one of them was with my aunt when she died aged 95 a few years ago.

Thanks for the update on her son, Kit Browning, and that book on Vanishing Cornwall .. I expect much has continued to change – well I know it has – perhaps I can get it out of the library sometime.

@ Teresa – I think most of us have heard of Daphne du Maurier and Dickens (though he never wrote about Cornwall – just visited and no doubt picked up some character traits). Thanks – yes I was pleased to be able to highlight Annalisa, Suzanne and Zannie … local bloggers and authors …

@ Chrys – that’s great – I really like the look of “The Little Land of Cornwall” and must now read it myself ..

@ Joanne – she is a classic author – so true … and those words – ‘her chair’ …
Oh thanks for the recommendation of Ann Summerville, a friend of yours, and her cozy mysteries … I shall check her out.

@ Suzanne – I remember the tv series (or some of the programmes) called ‘Wycliffe by WJ Burley … also Sharon Tregenza.

@ Bish – thanks … I got rid of a lot of books when I moved, and we sadly had to lose many of my mother’s after her death – but I was able to keep some here … but I need to whittle down a little more again. I have some shelves!

@ Maria – thanks … in this ‘game’ of the A-Z Challenge we need to be creative. Good luck for your Z postcard …

Thank you so much - brilliant comments and ideas .. cheers HIlary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Alex – lots of authors and books and many more I couldn’t and failed to list … yes the ‘Pooh and the Philosophers’ book became quite a cult book – I saw it at the airport one day: haven’t read it though. AA Milne created his stories from a landscape in East Sussex – here where I actually live.

I see you haven’t sussed the code for my theme: ABCs … Aspects of British C….. – the six A-Zs are all in this vein … so authors won’t fit – and my knowledge is appalling – sadly.

@ Susan – thanks so much … yes I could do with a walk on Plettenberg Bay beach .. but I’ll make do with Eastbourne! Z has arrived … and I hope you’ll get to walk on a beach in Cornwall sometime later in the year.

@ Susan – lots has happened in Cornwall … I knew, but am still becoming surprised at what I learn. It is an inspirational county – as too are the others …

@ Lee – du Maurier … most of us have read, or been guided to read. Glad you’ve read Pilcher’s book too … and now you know about the three bloggers, who live in Cornwall … and yes tomorrow has arrived and I need to catch up.

@ Lisa – I remember you ordering that book … delighted. Also that you appear to have learnt much and been fascinated by all things Cornish … so happy to read that …

@ Nila – I don’t think you have told me til now that you’re a fan of du Maurier’s … fantastic you’ve got such a collection of all her books – wonderful. I’m thrilled to have your comment – that’s so kind of you … I shall still be posting and will definitely be around …

@ Paula – well now’s the chance to correct that and read something pleasurable about Cornwall from a novelist … a few others are being recommended in the comments and see my last note at the end of these replies …

@ Sara – yes April positively whizzes away … and that’s wonderful that you’re thinking about visiting Cornwall. I used to love the Victoria Holt books … so must check this one out down at the library …

@ Samantha – du Maurier is an adopted Cornish .. Thomas Hardy is Dorset way (West Country) around the Anglo-Saxon realm of Wessex.

I don’t think I’ve seen the Shell Seekers and only a few of the earlier Poldark – I was in South Africa – the new Poldark is very scenic and seems to have caught the public’s imagination …

Yes we do have some very good authors, who are remembered decades, and centuries on ... also thankfully we have the means to have recorded them through the library system and now the British Library …

Certainly there’s lots to fire the imagination from the county …

@ Jeffrey – that’s great … that you enjoy that kind of reference book … I shall be looking at my copy too ..

@ Sharon – Yammer was a good Y word for my state of literary health at this stage in the A-Z … I’ve never seen the film about the Shell Seekers … I might look it out. XYZ are interesting letters – and I forgot about W!!!

@ Jess – thanks for coming over … there’s a lot going on in Cornwall and has been a lot over the centuries …

@ Sharon – the Shell Seekers was enjoyed by many and it’s set in the area we lived around … so appeals to the family.

@ Valerie – gosh did you sing the “Song of the Western Men” at school – where were you at school then?

Thanks everyone so much for your comments … I’m going to add a few notes on other books here in a new comment - cheers Hilary

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Other books ...

One book I’ve mentioned before is “The Mousehole Cat” and I wrote a post about the legend – but totally forgot for this post: it’s an essential Cornish story …

http://positiveletters.blogspot.co.uk/2014/12/star-gazey-pie-mousehole.html

Then there are all the Museum, Garden books … for example “The Eden Project”; the story of Heligan … etc etc …

"Emperor Smith: The Man Who Built Scilly" by Sam Llewellyn - which Bob Scotney recommended ... and sounded so fascinating ... I bought a copy.

Many more too I expect ... cheers Hilary

Deniz Bevan said...

Wonderful list, Hilary! I've only read a few of these authors. I live that book, The Shell Seekers. I think I'd like that place names book for research...

Natasha Duncan-Drake said...

Wow, that is a serious list of authors and books! I shall have to bookmark it to come back and appreciate it properly :)
Tasha
Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

Lynn said...

There was a Daphne du Maurier story set in Venice, called Don't Look Now - riveting. That one sticks in my mind...

Marcy said...

Oh my, where to start! So many good reading suggestions here. Thanks again!

Sara C. Snider said...

I've read some of the authors you mention, but had no idea they were from Cornwall, so that's pretty coo.

Also, Hawker's hut looks suspiciously like a Hobbit hole. ;)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Deniz - I can imagine the place names book could help or throw up a few ideas in the name of research. The Shell Seekers is a deliciously lovely read - I agree!

@ Tasha - thanks so much .. I had way too many ... but at least I got some listed up ...

@ Lynn - Daphne du Maurier must have travelled through Europe with her army husband so would have garnered ideas for the story - there's a collection of 5 long stories, in which it appears.

@ Marcy - I'm glad you appreciated the literary listings ...

@ Sara - they were residents for a while, or were born in the county .. I just had to write my Y post!

Hawker's hut - looks out over the Atlantic Ocean .. and Hawker wrote and thought here .. so a hobbit hole it could easily be - the Hobbit Hole I guess would be more comfortable!

Cheers to you all .. thanks - glad my listings gave everyone a few thoughts .. Hilary

Michelle Wallace said...

Entertaining and original Y-post!
I know 2 of those bloggers.
I have a Daphne du Maurier short story collection titled The Doll short stories.... I need to sort out my bookshelves and just dug it out the other day...

Karen Lange said...

I thought I'd commented on this, but apparently not. :) I appreciate the info, as always, and the smile that comes from reading your posts. Hope all is well and you are enjoying your week!:)

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

Hi Michelle - it was a packed and unintentionally an original Y post .. still at least the references are here. I thought you might know two of those bloggers ... I must read the du Maurier "The Doll" stories .. I'll check it out ... bookshelves - mine are going to be 'attacked' during this blogging break ...

Hi Karen - thanks for dropping in - good to see you .. and for your smiling comment - makes me cheerful to get them! That week was long ago .. and I'm still trying to catch up ..

Cheers to you both - Hilary