Tuesday, 14 April 2015

L is for Ley Lines and Lanes …



The St. Michael Alignment is perhaps the most prominent and intriguing of the many ley lines that criss-cross Britain.  It is 350 miles long from Lands End in Cornwall to Hopton-on-Sea, on the Norfolk coast.


Saint Michael Alighment
 - see here at Big Thinkand strange maps - 527


Their existence was suggested in 1921 by the amateur archaeologist Alfred Watkins, whose book ‘The Old Straight Track’ (1925) brought the alignments to the attention of the wider public.


The hurled Hurlers - Standing Stones

Watkins believed that the ancient features, such as Standing Stones, Wayside Crosses, Causeways, Hill Forts and Ancient Churches on mounds … were connected by ancient trackways, linking one hill top to another in a straight line.




St Michael's Mount in Penzance Bay


The St Michael’s Mount Ley Line traverses this island monastery off the Cornish Coast … diagonally tracking up through Cornwall – touching the Hurlers … see H … and onwards towards Norfolk.



Lane near Launceston, mid north Cornwall


How many Cornish Lanes does it criss-cross, we will never know … as the land was enclosed, hedges were built beside existing tracks … transporting goods and animals was time-consuming, so parishes tended to have an intricate system of Lanes ensuring the distances to be travelled were as short as possible.


Red Campion and Yarrow
on a verge side hedgerow



That is L for Ley Lines criss-crossing the Lanes of Cornwall where perhaps you could Lay yourself down to Lazily Look at the Lush woodland-edge flora … from Aspects of British Cornwall …







Hilary Melton-Butcher

Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

53 comments:

Marcy said...

L is also for lovely. I continue to enjoy reading your lovely posts. The history of Britain is fascinating to me.

Rhonda Albom said...

As always, I learned something here. I wish we had visited the hurled hurlers.

Clarabelle Rant said...

I find history exciting. It always has the promise of making something old new again. Standing stones might be linked to Ley Lines, gives an ancient way of life a new twist.

You can find me here:
ClarabelleRant

Natasha Duncan-Drake said...

That lane near Lauceston looks very beautiful. We used to go walking in places like that when we went on holiday in Somerset.
Tasha
Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

Annalisa Crawford said...

I don't know much about ley lines, but I think the beliefs of ancient people are fascinating.

Annalisa, writing A-Z vignettes, at Wake Up, Eat, Write, Sleep

Out on the prairie said...

Such a lovely area you live in. I am amazed at all I have learned so far. I really need to visit this area.

Susan Scott said...

Ley lines .. even the words sound lovely. We have ley lines here in SA too. I think they're supposed to have been constructed according to ancient wisdom. All the way to Norfolk? I'm not surprised. Thank you Hilary. I'm trying to figure out who to ask to come with me when I go travelling to Cornwall.

Jo said...

I'm a little puzzled here Hilary. Ley lines to me are sources of magic energy and I know you don't mean that. I guess I should go google Ley Lines.

Joanne said...

lots of L words. Not lagging in great information and nice pics.

Julie Flanders said...

I've never heard of Ley Lines before. Another fascinating tidbit!

Patsy said...

Hopton-on-Sea is a great name! I want to go there, do some research and set a story there. Don't suppose they have many ferries?

There are so many things about our planet and our history we still don't properly understand - and perhaps we never will.

Manzanita said...

I find this so interesting that it sends shivers down my spine. I've visited some of these sites and I could feel the ancient attraction and the knowledge they must have had.

Chrys Fey said...

Ley Lines is a new term for me. The lane near Launceston is beautiful. I'd like to walk down there with my camera. :)

Michael Di Gesu said...

Hi, Hilary,

I finally got a chance to visit! As always I enjoyed your historical count of St. Michael's. Looks like such a lovely place to "Lazily look at the lush woodland edge flora..."

I certainly wish I was there....

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Marcy – so pleased you’re enjoying the posts .. lovely to have your comment

@ Rhonda – another time .. by the sound of it the Hurled Hurlers aren’t going anywhere for another few hundred or thousand or more years!

@ Clarabelle – I’m certainly learning lots as I write these blog posts … ley lines and standing stones could so easily, and probably are linked …

@ Tasha – yes doesn’t the lane look quite delightful and there are still some hidden gems in the countryside and out in the counties …

@ Annalisa – I too know little, but couldn’t help but do this write up here … but how our ancestors got around the country and around the seas quite so much always amazes me ..

@ OOTP – well that’s great to know – you’re even considering visiting from my postings … England is quite delightful … but I live south of London … but the family has always had close connections with Cornwall .. mother and grandparents …

@ Susan – Ley Lines … sounds like laying over .. but they are incredible … and could so easily be linked with ancient features … and the stars – as they are in Peru, and presumably South Africa and Australia …

This map was a great find for me for this series of postings ..

That’s good to hear about you coming over and visiting … and having someone to be with you makes sense .. and will be more fun in many ways …

@ Jo – This was some information I found and I don’t think any of us knows exactly about Ley Lines .. or the Nazca lines or others .. I just posted some of what I found .. anyway I expect your googling would have enlightened you more …

@ Joanne – thank you .. yes L words galore and definitely no lagging …

@ Julie – have you not heard of the Nazca lines in Peru … they are believed to be similar …

@ Patsy – that sounds like a great idea .. a visit to Hopton on Sea … Great Yarmouth can’t be far away … and they have ferries …

Yes we don’t understand very much of our planet do we … and certainly I won’t in my lifetime!! But we’re always adding little bits to our knowledge …

@ Manzanita – how fascinating that you’ve visited some of the places mentioned along this ley line … and you could feel that ancient attraction … there’s definitely something to it ..

Thanks everyone … great thoughts here … but it’s good to know the ancient peoples are kept in our minds as we visit these ancient sites … cheers Hilary

STILLMAGNOLIA said...

Stopped by from A-Z. Loved your post and the pictures.

cleemckenzie said...

Fascinating. And to think it was an amateur archaeologist who first proposed these Ley Lines existed. Early engineering always amazes me. Thanks for another informative and interesting post.

Susan Gourley/Kelley said...

So interesting to hear the speculation. How much did the folks way back when understand.

David P. King said...

Follwing that ley line would be epic! :)

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

So how straight are the lines then?

Empty Nest Insider said...

Loved learning about the Ley Lines and Lanes! Your last line was lovely, Hilary!

Julie

Bob Scotney said...

I shall have to look up more about Ley Lines and the stories behind them. Yet another fine topic you've got me into.

Mark Clough said...

Lovely pictures, as ever.

Sophie Duncan said...

Oh wow - the photo of the lane near Launceston is fabulous, the light is incredible.
Sophie
Sophie's Thoughts & Fumbles
FB3X
Wittegen Press

Rosie Amber said...

Ley lines are really fascinating, I suspect they hum with age and ancient knowledge.

Nilanjana Bose said...

I could totally lay myself down and lazily look at the lush woods..or the sea or the villages..not exactly a terrible way to spend a holiday..all your posts are making me feel like I want to go there NOW!

Best always,
Nila.

Elizabeth Spann Craig said...

Well done with L! Those Standing stones remind me a bit of a smaller Stonehenge.

Jeffrey Scott said...

As always, and interesting post. Love learning new things about England.

Lisa said...

Loving your posts this A to Z, though that doesn't surprise me in the least! I've heard of Lay Lines, and love the idea of them. Love that Lane near Launceston, reminds me of Lord of the Rings and something one might see in one of the films... Lisa, co-host AtoZ 2015, @ http://www.lisabuiecollard.com

Melissa Sugar said...

For me today, L is for learning. I always learn some interesting and beautiful piece of history when I read your blog post. It seem that every blog I have visited today (not many I am afraid) but all of them have so far been an exciting learning experience.

loverofwords said...

Mystical too, I read on your reference. My friend and I did visit St. Michael's Mount. Wish I knew more about Cornwall when we were there. Now at least, I know a little more, thanks to you Hilary.

Ann Best said...

Fascinating as always. Love the play on words. ((( )))

Jean Davis said...

Beautiful photo of the lane. We don't have anything of the like around here. Every time I stop at your blog it's like taking a little vacation. :)

Jean Davis said...

Beautiful photo of the lane. We don't have anything of the like around here. Every time I stop at your blog it's like taking a little vacation. :)

Mark Koopmans said...

The thought that their was a road system well before we ever considered it is fascinating :)

I bet there's a YA book in there, somewhere :)

Denise Covey said...

Well, Hilary, I'd never heard of lay lines. It is fascinating to travel roads that have a long history. Lovely pics too.

Hope you're enjoying the challenge! Today I'm catching up. Been travelling and still am, but have found free wi-fi in a local library.

Denise :-)

Margie said...

Your post on ley lines is so very fascinating ...thanks Hilary ..
And I always so enjoy the wonderful photos you add.

Paula Kaye said...

L is for love....I love your posts and how you educate me everyday about your Cornish ways.

KAT Writer said...

I love hearing how someone saw something that everyone else had missed. Great post.

Nick Wilford said...

Ley lines are pretty interesting. For some reason I imagined them in curves, following the contours of the land. I didn't know there was one so long and straight.

mail4rosey said...

I wouldn't mind lazily lounging around... if there were no prickers or thorns to be found. :)

Silvia Villalobos said...

Widely interesting and so fascinating. Britain is really a wonder in so many ways. I really had no idea, but assume few people knew, making your post on ancient believes and relics all the more amazing. Thank you.

Sara C. Snider said...

I've always liked the idea of ley lines. There's a hint of magic about them, and I find that exciting.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ StillMagnolia – good to see you and thanks for your comment.

@ Lee – I found this article interesting too … probably need to get his book. One wonders about people being able to record so much, and travel etc … thank goodness they did leave us ideas and notes …

@ Susan – the peoples were able to work things out and evaluate what the land was imparting to us .. you’re so right.

@ David – up and down dale vising all the sites – that’s a pretty amazing idea …

@ Alex – they’re not straight as such .. this is a ‘Strange Map’ blog … but I can believe there were probably sight lines across the country in the early days …

@ Julie – thanks luxuriously lying down seems a good idea to me …

@ Bob – sorry to have sent you off in another direction – still it’s good to learn more …

@ Mark – thanks …

@ Sophie – yes .. totally reminds me of so many trips I made with my parents, by myself in days gone by …

@ Rosie – I know some people can pick up ‘vibrations’ from ancient sites … so there’s something about them – and I’m sure if we could peel the layers back lots of knowledge and wisdom.

@ Nila – yes .. the more I write, and the more of your comments are made … I too want to up sticks and take a trip to Cornwall.

@ Elizabeth – they try and tie all the Stones to each other somehow … and the scientists are still evaluating and researching those periods of time … and still digging to unearth other potential clues

@ Jeffrey – thanks so much .. I’m delighted to see you here, and to read that you’re interested in my snippets …

@ Lisa – thanks so much – really appreciate the comment. I now really need to learn more about Ley Lines … yes Tolkien’s Hobbit could well have been conjured/created from a lane similar to this one in the Midlands where he was living …

@ Melissa – that’s great to see you’re enjoying that learning experience .. but I wouldn’t expect less from a lawyer with authorly designs! Thanks so much …

@ Nat – yes mystical too. I’m glad you had a chance to visit St Michael’s Mount … and I always find I want to revisit places, because we learn as we go don’t we … and I’m so happy to read you’re enjoying the visits …

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Ann- thanks so much … so good to see you …

@ Jean – delighted to see you … and to know you’re taking a mini vacation with me on my travels through Cornwall or back via time …

@ Mark – yes the trackways are fascinating to know and think about … there may well be a YA book in there … but I’m not sure that’s the direction I’m going in – who knows what the future holds!

@ Denise – happy travels – the ley lines I think would be a fascinating topic to explore more about … and yes I’m enjoying the Challenge … I think!!!!!

@ Margie – glad you enjoyed the post and I’m pleased the photos bring the post to light …

@ Paula – thank you so very much … I’m so appreciative of you enjoying the posts and the learning with love!

@ Kat – it’s an interesting thought isn’t it – that enquiring mind searching and then thinking about a new idea ..

@ Nick – this is a ‘Strange Map’ image … so they would be following the contours – it simply couldn’t be ‘dead’ straight … it’s a ‘fictional’ but logical connective line …

@ Rosey – nor would I right at the moment … lazily lie around .. but the day beckons! Definitely no thorns around …

@ Silvia – we have a very varied history … I’m sure as much as Romania … but we were good at recording things, which seems to continue to this day … hence ‘our’ (their) knowledge – that’s available for me to impart at times.

@ Sara – there’s definitely ancient wisdom, folklore and probably magic about them … it’s thought provoking isn’t it ..

Cheers to you all – thanks for commenting and being so interested … it’s lovely to see the comments and read your thoughts - Hilary

suesconsideredtrifles said...

Hilary, it's fascinating that all those places line up. Your blog always provides lots of information. Thanks. Sue (who has a new - not A to Z - blog.
Sue’s words and pictures)

rosaria williams said...

Wonderful! Now, I want to see all your attractions...

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Chrys - they are our term for ancient pathways .. and yes the lane is quite delightful to look at isn't it ..

@ Michael - how good to see you .. and of course for a post on St Michael .. it is a wonderful place to visit ... and then the lanes ... thank you ..

@ Sue - apparently the ley line is there ... there are others in the UK ... and thanks for the visit.

@ Rosaria - well there's lots of places to see in Cornwall ..

Thanks to you all -so good to see you - cheers Hilary

Sara said...

I enjoyed this post. I loved the picture of the Lane near Launceston. It looks like a fairy land with a round circle:~)

This was another interesting post. I like the idea of ancient people being creative to create straight lines from one place to another.

Michelle Wallace said...

I love the L-alliteration at the end...
Interesting to think that the ancient features were/may have been connected by ancient trackways...

Deniz Bevan said...

Ley lines are fascinating. If only we could find more written sources from the builders of some of those standing stones!

J Lenni Dorner said...

I've only ever heard of Ley Lines in the terms of psychic or magic energy. The idea that certain areas are able to pull and maintain more ethereal power, which gifted folk could access like a cup of espresso.

Hilary Melton-Butcher said...

@ Sara - those sorts of lanes used to be so prevalent ... now with the demands of bigger machinery, cars and vans the poor hedges, or trees get swept away. Sad ...

The Ley Lines are being researched into - as they appear in many countries ... but also the early peoples finding the quickest route through makes so much sense ...

@ Michelle - I seem to have got into the habit of using alliteration to end my A-Z posts ... adds a bit of colourful fun to the end of each post ...

I'm sure ancient features were connected via ancient trackways ... and that under the present day history their remains are still there and can/could be traced with our modern technologies ...

@ Deniz - Ley lines do fascinate don't they ... there are plenty in Europe too. While if only Standing Stones could talk ... that would really help!!

@ J - yes you're right Ley Lines are linked with psychic or magic energy ... we seem to be unravelling a tiny bit more information about them - or at least surmising ... there's definitely energy links around ...

Cheers to you all - thanks for the comments apologies for being late in replying back .. Hilary